Military News

Friday, April 30, 2010

Navy Seabees, US Army South Conduct Joint Exercise in Nicaragua


By Arwen Consaul, U.S. Army South Public Affairs

April 30, 2010 - LOS SANCHEZ, Nicaragua (NNS) -- U.S. Army South, along with U.S. Navy Seabees, worked together with the Nicaraguan National Assembly to construct three waterwells in Los Sanchez, Samaria and La Noria from March 21 until May 21 as part of Army South's, Beyond the Horizon mission.

Beyond the Horizon is a humanitarian and civic assistance mission in Nicaragua, providing focused medical and civil engineering support to the people of the region. The mission provides an opportunity to work in partnership with the Nicaraguan military, as well as provide a real-world learning environment for U.S. military service members.

The engineering projects for this year's Beyond the Horizon mission are conducted by U.S. Naval Construction Force, better known as Seabees, from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 25, out of Ft McCroy, Wisconsin. The Seabees arrived in Nicaragua March 11 and began preparations for constructing the three wells.

"The digging of these wells are important because they provide the community with much needed potable water in a central location," said Ensign Joe Neal, the officer in charge of NMCB 25. "By digging this well we provided the town of Samaria with a fresh water source within the town. Prior to this the locals had to walk to the river for potable water which was some ways out."

Nicaraguan Army Lt. Rodolpho Otero, a force protection officer providing security for the Seabee's, spoke with many Nicaraguan locals who stopped by to talk with and both the military and the civilians engineers.

"Everyone agrees that this well was very much needed for this village and the people living in the surrounding area," said Otero. "The locals are all very happy to see Americans working with the Nicaraguan military on this project."

Since construction began on March 21, the engineering detachment, along with support from Army South and the Nicaraguan Army, has completed the well at Samaria and has already begun construction on the well in Los Sanchez.

With a tight timeline for the construction of three water wells, Neal also points out that this is a great opportunity to meet the people of Nicaragua.

"This mission gives us opportunities to interact with local people and the Nicaraguan Army while at the same time getting real world training for future missions," said Neal. "It also gives us chances to interact with the local populace showing that both countries are working together."

Project Handclasp Humanitarian Efforts Recognized

From Project Handclasp Public Affairs

April 30, 2010 - SAN DIEGO (NNS) -- Project Handclasp's senior logistics planners in San Diego were visited by the wife of the deputy defense secretary to recognize the Haiti humanitarian efforts of San Diego Sailors April 26.

Mary Murphy, the wife of the Honorable William J. Lynn, received a tour of the Project Handclasp Global Logistics Center warehouse where pallets are created, filled with relief supplies targeted to those in dire need.

Murphy toured the warehouse to gain a better understanding of Project Handclasp's mission and how it supports mission commanders.

The January earthquake in Haiti left thousands of Haitian citizens in need of subsistence level support ranging from food and water to medical supplies and basic toiletries. Project Handclasp ensured tons of material and supplies was shipped to Haiti at the earliest opportunity, through both air and sealift operations.

Project Handclasp collects goodwill materials donated by America's private sector at no-cost for distribution by Sailors and Marines, allowing them to serve as ambassadors of goodwill on behalf of Americans.

To date, Project Handclasp has delivered more than 2.5 million high-nutrition meals, 15,000 pots and pans, 405 water filter capability packages, medical, hygiene, and other personal care items, and they are not done yet.

"We are anticipating having to provide more and more products as time goes by," said Paul Brown, director of Project Handclasp.

As part of Southern Partnership Station 2010, Project Handclasp will deliver one million high-nutrition meals and approximately 600 water filters.

In addition to Haiti relief efforts, Project Handclasp has coordinated with Pacific Partnership via the hospital ship USNS Mercy (T-AH 19), scheduled to depart in May to work with Africa Partnership Station 2010 via USS Gunston Hall (LSD 44).

"There are so many needs in the world and the Navy has unique access, manpower and ability to make a difference," Brown said. "The Navy motto is 'A Global Force for Good' and that's what we try to exemplify here."

For more information about Project Handclasp or to inquire about donating to the program, call the Project Handclasp office at (619) 532-1492.

Wingman Stand Down 2010 in May focuses on Airmen safety, well-being

by Master Sgt. Russell P. Petcoff

4/30/2010 - WASHINGTON (AFNS) -- For a half day in May, Airmen will learn strategies to prevent suicides and private motor vehicle accidents as part of Wingman Stand Down 2010. The exact date for the stand down will be left to individual units to determine.

In a jointly signed letter, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz and Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force James A. Roy noted the reasons for the stand down.

"Sadly, 18 Airmen, eight guardsmen and reservists, and three civilians, of all ranks and specialties, have taken their own lives so far this year," the senior leaders noted. "Additionally, approximately 50 Air Force members annually are killed in motor vehicle accidents."

"To jump-start this effort, we are directing a half-day wingman stand down for all units in May 2010. This stand down will include discussions at squadron level or below, led by unit leadership," the joint letter by the general and chief says. "The stand down will include three topics: suicide prevention, motor vehicle safety and improving wingman skills by knowing your people.

"Your full participation and support is essential as our Air Force moves forward to reduce suicides and injuries, save lives and preserve our most important asset, our Airmen," the letter says.

The Air Force surgeon general told a congressional panel last month the Air Force's suicide prevention program, implemented in 1997, continues to be effective, but the service has experienced a slowly increasing rate since 2007.

"We are enhancing our prevention programs to further decrease suicides by targeting those most stressed by high operations tempo," Lt. Gen. (Dr.) Charles B. Green told the Senate Armed Services Committee's Personnel Subcommittee March 24. "We now target more in-depth interventions and training to Air Force security forces and intelligence career fields, whom we have identified as having double the incidence of suicide compared to the rest of the Air Force."

The Air Force continues training the entire force on suicide prevention and coping skills to improve both Airman and family resilience, Doctor Green said.

"We adapted new concepts rapidly such as 'Ask, Care and Escort,' and collaborative care, wherein mental health providers are now embedded in the majority of our family health clinics," Doctor Green said. "We have also studied and targeted interventions for our civilian work force identified at high risk. Collaborative care, on-line help, mandatory post-deployment surveys and Family Life counselors at our Airman and Family Readiness Centers have decreased stigma and allowed those in need to get help earlier."

The Air Force's focal point for safety on the Air Staff said the stand down will "reenergize the wingman concept," what he called the foundational approach to suicide prevention and unit safety.

"Wingman Stand Down 2010 offers a pause in the day-to-day mission focus of Airmen in order to focus on the rise in Air Force suicides, reinvigorate the wingman concept and examine the loss of Airmen to private motor vehicle accidents," said Maj. Gen. Frederick F. Roggero, the chief of Air Force safety. General Roggero also serves as the commander of the Air Force Safety Center at Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M.

The structure of the stand down features unit commander comments, video presentations on safety and suicide prevention, guided small-group discussions, wingman card distribution and asking Airmen to personally identify their wingman.

The guided discussions will be the focus of the half-day event, said Col. Roberto Guerrero, the vice commander of the Air Force Safety Center. The discussions will encourage Airmen to strengthen wingman relationships and teach them to prevent private motor vehicle accidents by curbing reckless behavior and reduce suicides through proactive intervention.

The Wingman concept is part of the Air Force flying culture and dates back to the earliest days of aerial combat.

"Wingmen have always operated as a pair to watch each other's backs," Colonel Guerrero said. "We take responsibility for one another and provide help when our wingman needs it."

Major commands will be sending guidelines and plans about how to implement Wingman Stand Down 2010 to their respective subordinate units.

Guard units ready as Gulf Coast braces for oil spill

by Master Sgt. Mike R. Smith
National Guard Bureau

4/30/2010 - ARLINGTON, Va. (AFNS) -- Officials in at least three states along the Gulf of Mexico are preparing for a potential call for thousands of National Guard members as government leaders ramp up a response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal sent letters to federal officials asking them to approve funding to activate up to 6,000 Guardmembers to assist in the response to the oil spill.

In letters to Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates and to Janet Napolitano, the secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, Governor Jindal said the Guard "will provide security, medical capabilities, engineers and communication support in response to this threat."

"Currently, our Soldiers and Airmen are staging for and are engaged in the planning of the effort to evacuate and provide security and clean up for the coastal communities expected to be impacted by the oil spill," he wrote. "They are engaged in the protection of vital infrastructure to include medical facilities, fuel distribution, interstate highways, water-ice distribution and power facilities, which are all vital to the recovery of coastal Louisiana."

Governor Jindal went on to say that he "believe(s) these National Guard operations are necessary and appropriate to protect this region of our nation from a significant national event with potential catastrophic loss of natural resources."

Officials in other Gulf Coast states, including Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Texas, reported they are in close contact with state and federal officials and are ready to respond with Guard personnel and equipment if called out to assist in their communities.

"Right now, we are taking a look at the assets that are available and the possible missions that our Guard forces could receive, as far as dealing with an oil spill," said Army Maj. Christian Patterson, Mississippi Guard spokesman. "We are looking at everything and waiting to see what happens, to be ready to do whatever we are called on to do."

Major Patterson said the Mississippi Guard has a number of assets that can be used in such an emergency, including security forces to support police at checkpoints, aviation assets for aerial reconnaissance missions and civil engineers.

Army Maj. Cynthia Bachus, the state public affairs officer for the Alabama Guard, said her state is also monitoring the situation. "We have drill this weekend ... so if something does occur we will be here," she said.

Air Force Lt. Col. Ron Tittle, the Florida state public affairs officer, said the Florida Guard is prepared to support the state's Division of Emergency Management.

Although it is hard to speculate on missions they might perform, if called out, Colonel Tittle said they typically look at how they respond to natural disasters, like hurricanes, with engineering assets and serving at points of distribution for those affected in their communities.

"It just depends," he said. "We just look at all the different possibilities and pull out our plans that we use to respond to other types of disasters and adapt a plan accordingly."

Project Handclasp Humanitarian Efforts Recognized

April 30, 2010 - SAN DIEGO (NNS) -- Project Handclasp's senior logistics planners in San Diego were visited by the wife of the deputy defense secretary to recognize the Haiti humanitarian efforts of San Diego Sailors April 26.

Mary Murphy, the wife of the Honorable William J. Lynn, received a tour of the Project Handclasp Global Logistics Center warehouse where pallets are created, filled with relief supplies targeted to those in dire need.

Murphy toured the warehouse to gain a better understanding of Project Handclasp's mission and how it supports mission commanders.

The January earthquake in Haiti left thousands of Haitian citizens in need of subsistence level support ranging from food and water to medical supplies and basic toiletries. Project Handclasp ensured tons of material and supplies was shipped to Haiti at the earliest opportunity, through both air and sealift operations.

Project Handclasp collects goodwill materials donated by America's private sector at no-cost for distribution by Sailors and Marines, allowing them to serve as ambassadors of goodwill on behalf of Americans.

To date, Project Handclasp has delivered more than 2.5 million high-nutrition meals, 15,000 pots and pans, 405 water filter capability packages, medical, hygiene, and other personal care items, and they are not done yet.

"We are anticipating having to provide more and more products as time goes by," said Paul Brown, director of Project Handclasp.

As part of Southern Partnership Station 2010, Project Handclasp will deliver one million high-nutrition meals and approximately 600 water filters.

In addition to Haiti relief efforts, Project Handclasp has coordinated with Pacific Partnership via the hospital ship USNS Mercy (T-AH 19), scheduled to depart in May to work with Africa Partnership Station 2010 via USS Gunston Hall (LSD 44).

"There are so many needs in the world and the Navy has unique access, manpower and ability to make a difference," Brown said. "The Navy motto is 'A Global Force for Good' and that's what we try to exemplify here."

For more information about Project Handclasp or to inquire about donating to the program, call the Project Handclasp office at (619) 532-1492.

Sailors Give Back to the Community at Kansas City Navy Week

By Lt. Glenn Sircy, Navy Office of Community Outreach Public Affairs

April 30, 2010 - KANSAS CITY, Mo. (NNS) -- Fifteen Sailors from Navy Recruiting Station and Navy Operational Support Center Kansas City, Mo., volunteered to help build a home with Habitat for Humanity Kansas City April 28.

Habitat for Humanity Kansas City is the seventh oldest affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International and is a non-profit Christian ministry working to fulfill the dream of home ownership for low-income families in the greater Kansas City metropolitan area.

Throughout the day, Sailors replaced drywall and installed insulation. They also landscaped, installed siding, painted and removed tattered and worn flooring, under the guidance of a site manager.

"This is my first opportunity working with Sailors and they have been incredible. I am truly impressed with how they serve their country and community at the same time," said Robert Pine, the site manager.

"It is always good to give back to the community and help others that are less fortunate. Since an early age, I have always liked helping people, and I'm grateful to be able to lend a helping hand today," said Sonar Technician 2nd Class (SW) Chris Wheeler.

"The home is scheduled to be completed by the end of the summer, and it will become the home of a local Kansas City elderly gentleman with limited mobility," said Emily Ulm, volunteer services coordinator.

Kansas City Navy Week is one of 20 Navy weeks planned across the country in 2010. Navy weeks are designed to educate Americans on the importance of Naval service, understand the investment they make in their Navy and to increase awareness in cities which might not otherwise see the Navy at work on a regular basis.

U.S.-China Officials Discuss MIA Cases

April 30, 2010 - Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for POW/Missing Personnel Affairs Bob Newberry concluded a week-long visit to China today after meeting with Chinese officials to discuss several U.S. MIA cases. China's past cooperation has led to the recovery of U.S. MIA remains from World War II, the Korean War, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War.

During meetings with Ministry of Foreign Affairs and People's Liberation Army officials in Beijing, Newberry shared the details of 19 known American losses about which the Chinese may have knowledge. There were nine cases from World War II, five from the Korean War, and five from the Vietnam War.

Newberry highlighted two of these cases as holding promise for a successful resolution. One involved a C-47 crash in Guangxi near Wei Ming village in 1945. Two Americans and 35 Chinese soldiers perished in the crash and were buried nearby. The site was surveyed by a joint U.S.-China team in August 2009.

Another case he highlighted was a Korean War crash of a B-29 near Dandong in Liaoning Province. Three U.S. crew members were buried in graves there where Chinese citizens have provided details about the burial location. U.S. officials continue to work with Dandong representatives to establish firm plans for further investigations and excavations to recover the remains.

While Newberry was in Beijing, a U.S. team from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and the Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office was surveying an area of Guangdong in southern China where an American aircraft is believed to have crashed during the Korean War. Details of their findings are yet to be analyzed.

From 1975 to the present, 25 American remains have been identified from all conflicts as a direct result of the support from the PRC, and through agreements signed in 2008 and 2009, there has been progress in archival research, where the PLA has already provided documents related to U.S. air losses in China.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO Web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

MILITARY CONTRACTS

U.S. SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND

Harris Co., Rochester, N.Y., was awarded a modification to contract H92222-07-D-0008 on April 25, increasing the contract not-to-exceed funding ceiling from $422 million to $464 million. This 10-year indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract, with a five-year base period and one five-year option period, is for the procurement and sustainment of improved special operations forces high-frequency manpack radio systems in support of U.S. Special Operations Command. Work under this contract will continue to be performed in Rochester, N.Y., and is expected to be completed by April 30, 2012 for the base period, or April 30, 2017 if the five-year option period is exercised. U.S. Special Operations is the contracting activity.

Raytheon Co., Fort Wayne, Ind., was awarded a modification to contract H92222-08-D-0003 on April 26, increasing the contract not-to-exceed funding ceiling from $53,640,000 to $61,140,000. This three-year indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract is for the procurement and sustainment of multiband/multimission radio systems in support of U.S. Special Operations Command. Work under this contract will continue to be performed in Fort Wayne, Ind., and Largo, Fla., and is expected to be completed by Sept. 24, 2011. U.S. Special Operations is the contracting activity.

NAVY

Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding, Inc., Pascagoula, Miss., is being awarded an $184,000,507 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-06-C-2222) for the procurement of materials in support of LPD 26, the 10th ship in the LPD 17 amphibious transport dock ship class. Work will be performed in Pascagoula, Miss., and is expected to be completed by August 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

The Applied Physics Laboratories at the University of Washington, Seattle, Wash., is being awarded a $120,411,131 cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity task order contract for up to 657,115 staff hours to provide research, development, and engineering in seven core competency areas to maintain essential core capabilities. The seven core areas are: experimental oceanography; acoustic propagation; underwater instrumentation and equipment; marine corrosion; acoustic and related systems; simulations and signal processing; and mission related research and development. These capabilities are determined to be essential to support a variety of specific programs managed by different technical sponsor organizations. This contract includes an option which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $257,437,031 for up to 1,314,230 staff hours. Work will be performed in Seattle, Wash., and is expected to be completed by April 2015. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. No funds are obligated by award of this contract. Funds are obligated on individual task orders. Multiple appropriation types will be utilized throughout contract performance. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00024-10-D-6618).

J. Perez Construction, Inc.*, Davison, Mich. (N40083-10-D-0029); Old Veteran Construction, Inc.*, Chicago, Ill. (N40083-10-D-0030); A&D Powerline, JV*, Gallup, N.M. (N40083-10-D-0031); and Federal Construction Group, Inc.*, San Antonio, Texas (N40083-10-D-0032), are each being awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity design-build fire protection multiple-award construction contract for fire protection installation, repairs, new construction, and renovations with design capabilities at Naval Station Great Lakes and Department of Defense facilities in the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC), Midwest area of responsibility (AOR). The maximum dollar value for all four contracts combined is $30,000,000. Work will be performed in the NAVFAC Midwest AOR including Arkansas (6.25 percent), Illinois (6.25 percent), Indiana (6.25 percent), Iowa (6.25 percent), Kansas (6.25 percent), Kentucky (6.25 percent), Michigan (6.25 percent), Minnesota (6.25 percent), Mississippi (6.25 percent), Nebraska (6.25 percent), North Dakota (6.25 percent), Ohio (6.25 percent), Oklahoma (6.25 percent), South Dakota (6.25 percent), Tennessee (6.25 percent), and Wisconsin (6.25 percent). The term of the contract is not to exceed 60 months, with an expected completion date of April 2015. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured as an 8(a) set-aside via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online Web site, with 13 proposals received. These four contractors shall compete for task orders under the terms and conditions of the awarded contract. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Midwest, Great Lakes, Ill., is the contracting activity.

Hensel Phelps Construction Co., Inc., Chantilly, Va., is being awarded a $27,739,490 modification under a previously awarded firm-fixed price contract (N40080-08-C-0020) for furnishing and installing furniture, fixtures, and equipment in the co-located military department investigative agencies at Marine Corps Base Quantico. The total contract amount after exercise of this modification will be $356,681,004. Work will be performed in Quantico, Va., and is expected to be completed by December 2010. Contract funds in the amount of $27,349,824 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Washington, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

L3 Services, Inc., Mount Laurel, N.J., is being awarded a $15,147,985 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-award-fee contract (N00421-05-C-0009) to exercise an option for engineering and technical services and supplies to design, develop, procure, prototype, modify, integrate, test and evaluate, install, and provide logistics support for telecommunication and related communication-electronic systems. These services are in support of the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Special Communications Requirements Division. The estimated level of effort for this modification is 147,067 man-hours. Work will be performed in Lexington Park, Md. (80 percent), and St. Inigoes, Md. (20 percent), and is expected to be completed in October 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

Northrop Grumman, Annapolis, Md., is being awarded an $8,478,582 modification (P00002) under a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N00189-08-D-P002) to exercise option year two for engineering and technical services supporting the Advanced SEAL Delivery System planning yard in Kittery, Maine. Work will be performed in Annapolis, Md. (95 percent), and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (5 percent), and is expected to be completed by April 2011. Contract funds will expire before the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Fleet and Industrial Supply Center Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Annex, New Hampshire, is the contracting activity.

JLG Industries, Inc., McConnellsburg, Pa., is being awarded a $6,002,484 modification to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N68335-07-C-0451) to exercise an option for the procurement of 38 T-56 engine installation and removal vehicles. Work will be performed in McConnellsburg, Pa., and is expected to be completed in August 2010. Contract funds in the amount of $4,284,416 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

Shaw Environmental & Infrastructure, Inc., San Diego, Calif., is being awarded a $5,697,748 a firm-fixed-price, estimated indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for environmental laboratory services (sampling, analytical, and laboratory management) at the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southwest area of responsibility (AOR). The work to be performed provides for all labor, materials, equipment, supervision, and transportation necessary to perform environmental sampling, field testing, and laboratory testing services to support environmental programs that ensure compliance with applicable federal, state and local statutes and regulations, and Department of Defense policies, instructions and guidance. The maximum dollar value, including the base period, four option periods, and two award option periods, is $45,617,801. Work will be performed primarily in San Diego, Calif., and the NAVFAC Southwest AOR, including California (75 percent), Hawaii (20 percent), and Washington (5 percent), and is expected to be completed by April 2017. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the NAVFAC e-solicitation Web site, with three proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity (N62473-10-D-4003).

Contracting Systems, Inc., II*, Quakertown, Pa., is being awarded a $5,584,000 firm-fixed-price contract for construction of an addition to the Navy Marine Corps Reserve Center Lehigh Valley. The work to be performed provides for a supply warehouse, gear locker room, communications shop, classroom and conference space, administrative space, and women's and men's bathrooms with male locker area and shower stalls. A secure internet protocol router room, communication room, and mechanical and electrical rooms are also required. A vehicle maintenance facility will also be constructed at the site and will include high bay compartments, single-story steel framed structure with concrete foundation, flat metal panel, and sloped metal roof. Facility will include vehicle lube system and engine hoist. Site work will include rigid paving for military vehicles, and asphalt paving for parking privately owned vehicles. The contract also contains one unexercised option which, if exercised, would increase cumulative contract value to $5,596,500. Work will be performed in Allentown, Pa., and is expected to be completed by July 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online Web site, with four proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (N40085-10-C-9436).

ARMY

GM GDLS Defense Group, LLC, JV, Sterling Heights, Mich., was awarded on April 27 a $122,804,670 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract. This action funds the material for 500 sets of Stryker mobility drivelines to support Stryker vehicles in the Operation Enduring Freedom theater. Work is to be performed in Sterling Heights, Mich. (41 percent), and London, Ontario (59 percent), with an estimated completion date of June 30, 2011. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Tank Automotive & Armament Command, CCTA-AIP, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-07-D-M112)

Navistar Defense, LLC, Warrenville, Ill., was awarded on April 28 an $88,510,791 firm-fixed-price contract for 629 general transport trucks. Work is to be performed in West Point, Miss., with an estimated completion date of April 30, 2011. One bid was solicited with one bid received. U.S. Army TACOM LCMC, CCTA-ADBA, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-08-D-G097).

Caterpillar, Inc., Mossville, Ill., was awarded on April 28 a $49,833,457 fixed-price-economic price adjustment for the production of 198 Type I and Type II, T-5 and T-9 Dozer vehicles. Work is to be performed in Mossville, Ill., with an estimated completion date of June 6, 2013. Bids were solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities Web site with seven bids received. TACOM-Warren, CCTA-ADEC, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-08-D-0169).

Truck-Lite Co., Inc., was awarded on April 19 a $37,078,758 firm-fixed-price contract for Buffalo mine protected clearance vehicles, data items, a field support representative, and technical manuals. Work is to be performed in Falconer, N.Y., with an estimated completion date of May 22, 2012. One bid was solicited with one bid received. U.S. Army TACOM Contracting Center Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-09-D-0113).

Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., Hurst, Texas, was awarded on April 23 a $23,189,862 firm-fixed-price contract for the purchase of two commercial Bell Helicopter 412EP aircrafts, logistical support, spare parts package, special tools, and training. Work is to be performed in Quebec, Canada (88 percent), Piney Flats, Tenn. (8 percent), and Fort Worth, Texas (4 percent), with an estimated completion date of May 30, 2012. One bid was solicited with one bid received. U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, CCAM-RD-F, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-10-C-0085).

Ahtna Facility Services, Inc., Anchorage, Alaska, was awarded on April 28 a $21,700,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, firm-fixed-price contract for hospital environmental services for designated military treatment facilities on Fort Sam Houston and Camp Bullis, Texas, to include Brooke Army Medical Center and U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research. Work is to be performed on Fort Sam Houston, Texas, with an estimated completion date of April 30, 2011. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Center for Health Care Contracting, Health Care Acquisition Activity, U.S. Army Medical Commands, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, is the contracting activity (W81K04-10-D-0006).

Alutiiq International Solutions, LLC, Aurora, Colo., was awarded on April 27 a $14,040,623 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract is to construct a vehicle maintenance facility as part of a standard design unit operations facility. Primary facilities include: covered hardstand; vehicle maintenance shop; organizational parking; and organizational storage. Provide installation of intrusion detection system; energy monitoring and control system connections; fire alarm detection; reporting systems; mass notification system; automatic building sprinklers; and force protection measures. Supporting facilities include electricity; security lighting; water, sewer, and natural gas services; fire protection; paving for privately owned vehicle parking area, service roads, walks, curb, and gutters; storm drainage; information systems; lightning protection systems; site improvements and landscaping; information systems; and anti-terrorism measures. Anti-terrorism/force protection will be provided by use of setbacks, special windows, and doors. Comprehensive building and furnishings related to interior design services are required. Access for individuals with disabilities will be provided in public areas. Work is to be performed in Fort Stewart, Ga., with an estimated completion date of Oct. 18, 2011. Three bids were solicited with three bids received. U.S. Army Engineer District, Savannah, Ga., is the contracting activity (W912HN-08-D-0032).

Raytheon Co., Andover, Mass., was awarded on April 28 a $13,286,616 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract. This procurement is for on-site depot level diagnostic, fault isolation, clean and repair capability for PATRIOT weapon system major items. This service is beyond the capabilities of the batter battalion and intermediate support units. This procurement includes depot level clean-up, repair, and maintenance of PATRIOT major items, including services required to return and maintain PATRIOT major items deployed in Southwest Asia, Germany, Korea, and locations inside the contiguous United States to maximize operational readiness. Work is to be performed in Korea (39.1 percent); Qatar (5.7 percent); Germany (14.0 percent); El Paso, Texas (18.6 percent); Killeen, Texas (2.5 percent); Fayetteville, N.C. (1.8 percent); Lawton, Okla. (1.8 percent); Andover, Mass. (7.0 percent); Japan (4.5 percent); and Kuwait (4.9 percent), with an estimated completion date of June 16, 2011. One bid was solicited with one bid received. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aviation & Missile Command Contracting Center, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W31P4Q-06-C-0352).

CACI-WGI, Chantilly, Va., was awarded on April 23 a $12,731,855 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization, Joint Expeditionary Team. Work is to be performed in Reston, Va. (50 percent), and Afghanistan (50 percent) with an estimated completion date of April 21, 2013. Four bids were solicited with two bids received. Research Development & Engineering Command, Contracting Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., is the contracting activity (W91CRB-08-D-0027).

CACI-WGI, Chantilly, Va., was awarded on April 23 a $12,731,855 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization, Joint Expeditionary Team. Work is to be performed in Reston, Va. (50 percent), and Afghanistan (50 percent) with an estimated completion date of Aug. 28, 2009. Four bids were solicited with two bids received. Research Development & Engineering Command-Contracting Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., is the contracting activity (W91CRB-08-D-0027).

Military Sales Group, Inc., Nashville, Tenn., was awarded on April 27 an $11,602,674 firm-fixed-price contract for ground mobility vehicle components. This acquisition is to procure various quantities of 40 different components used on special operations command vehicles. Work is to be performed in Nashville, Tenn., with an estimated completion date of June 30, 2015. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Letterkenny Army Depot, Chambersburg, Pa., is the contracting activity (W911N2-10-D-0010).

Cajun Constructors, Inc., Baton Rouge, La., was awarded on April 23 an $11,182,945 firm-fixed-price contract. This procurement is for the Lake Pontchartrain and vicinity Louisiana Project, north of Airline Highway, St. Charles Parish, floodwall under I-310 - Phase 2. The work consists of structural demolition of existing I-310 sheet pile floodwall and adjacent scour protection; construction of proposed I-310 floodwall and access swing gate and all embankment placement and grading; relocations; access roads; traffic control; scour protection; and all other work associated with the floodwall as shown in the drawing. Work is to be performed in St. Charles Parish, La., with an estimated completion date of June 9, 2011. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with nine bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Hurricane Protection Office, New Orleans, La., is the contracting activity (W912P8-10-C-0075).

LECON, Inc., Houston, Texas, was awarded on April 23 a $9,756,000 firm-fixed-price contract. The work consist of channel excavation backfill, storm drains, articulating concrete blocks, metal piling, relief wells, concrete lining, and storm drains. Work is to be performed in Harris County, Texas, with an estimated completion date of May 31, 2012. Forty-eight bids were solicited with one bid received. U.S. Army Engineer District, Galveston, Texas, is the contracting activity (W912HY-10-C-0018).

I.L. Fleming, Inc., Midway, Ga., was awarded on April 28 a $9,422,500 firm-fixed-price contract for the design/build of brigade/battalion headquarters at Fort Polk. Work is to be performed in Fort Polk, La., with an estimated completed date of Oct. 4, 2011. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with three bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento, Calif., is the contracting activity (W912HN-08-D-0042).

TLW, Inc., Columbia, Miss., was awarded on April 23 an $8,511,259 firm-fixed-price construction contract with early contractor involvement for Chanel Complex PN 02239, Fort Bliss, Texas. Work is to be performed in Fort Bliss, Texas, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 12, 2011. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with three bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, Omaha, Neb., is the contracting activity (W9128F-08-C-0017).

Olin Corp., Winchester Division, East Alton, Ill., was awarded on April 28 an $8,802,810 basic ordering agreement with firm-fixed-priced-delivery orders. This award is made under the terms of the existing requirements contract for 9mm and M882 ball cartridges. This ammunition is used in the M9 Beretta pistol both for training and for combat. Work is to be performed in East Alton, Ill., with an estimated completion date of June 30, 2012. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with two bids received. HQ, U.S. Army Field Support Command, Rock Island, Ill., is the contracting activity (W52P1J-06-D-0031).

Alliant Ammunition and Powder Co., LLC, Radford, Va., was awarded on April 28 a $7,441,500 firm-fixed-price contract for support of the facility operations at Radford Army Ammunition Plant. Work is to be performed in Radford, Va., with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2010. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Headquarters, Army Sustainment Command, Rock Island, Ill., is the contracting activity (DAAA09-03-E-0001).

BAE Systems, Sealy, Texas., was awarded on April 26 a $5,575,385 firm-fixed-price contract for the purchase of eight M1086A1P2 and nine M1A096A1P2 Patriot vehicles with Patriot kits installed for the country of Taiwan, as well as seven M1088A1P2 tractors for the country of Taiwan, for a total of 24 vehicles purchased with this modification. Work is to be performed in Sealy, Texas, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2010. One bid was solicited with one bid received. TACOM Contracting Center, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-08-C-0460)

AIR FORCE

Lockheed Martin Corp., Marietta, Ga., was awarded a $98,649,000 contract which will provide one C-130J aircraft for the government of Israel. The contract also includes additional non-developmental items for the aircraft. At this time, $18,461,112 of foreign military financing has been obligated. 657AESS, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8625-06-C-6456).

Raytheon Co., Tucson, Ariz., was awarded a $53,100,000 contract which will provide for the engineering and manufacturing development for the Miniature Air Launched Decoy-Jammer. This includes the associated engineering, program management, supportability, mission planning, modeling and simulation, hardware fabrication, production readiness, software and testing. At this time, $24,500,000 has been obligated. 692 ARSS/PK, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is the contracting activity (FA8682-10-C-0010).

Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Rockville, Md., was awarded a $47,400,000 contract which will provide research with the 711th Human Performance Wing. The primary research areas are: nano-bio interaction effects; bioinformatics; toxicology; predictive modeling; biomarker discovery/assay development; and molecular foundations. At this time, $10,000 has been obligated. AFRL/PKHA, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8650-10-2-6A01).

Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc., Herndon, Va., was awarded a $24,302,490 contract which will develop and implement enterprise-wide computer network defense solutions. At this time, $3,422,619 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., is the contracting activity (SP0700-98-D-4002).

Wyle Laboratories, Inc., Huntsville, Ala., was awarded a $24,014,219 contract which will provide for the research, test and development, and delivery of architectural drawings; system/subsystems/infrastructure/prototype assessments; system alternatives recommendations; feasibility studies; interoperability testing; results; survey and infrastructure implementation designs; schedules and summary reports. At this time, $160,725 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., is the contracting activity (HC1047-05-D-4005).

Booz Allen & Hamilton, Inc., Herndon, Va., was awarded a $14,492,211 contract which will provide information assurance network operations cyber security solutions to the Army Accessions Command chief information officer in their evolving role as information technology lead in supporting military, civil, and commercial domains geographically dispersed around the globe. At this time, $50,000 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., is the contracting activity (SP0700-98-D-4002).

Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio, was awarded an $11,797,939 contract which will provide for the conduct of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear defense technology and mission assessment in order to leverage cutting edge technologies to increase force protection and maritime interdiction capabilities. At this time, $50,000 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., is the contracting activity (SP0700-00-D-3180).

Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc., Herndon, Va., was awarded an $8,928,083 contract which will provide advanced technology, analysis, and layered defense for increased defense of the Air Force network. At this time, $744,048 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., is the contracting activity (SP0700-98-D-4002).

Boeing Co., St. Louis, Mo., was awarded a $6,760,660 contract which will provide fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2011 option year sustaining support to the Lot 6 production contract. At this time, $3,371,832 has been obligated. 681 ARSS/PK, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is the contracting activity (FA8672-10-C-0013).

Veterans Northwest Construction, LLC, Seattle, Wash., was awarded a $6,006,965 contract which will provide renovation work of dormitories on Joint Base Lewis-McChord. At this time, the entire amount has been obligated. 62 CONS/LGCA, Joint Base Lewis-McChord Air Force Base, Wash., is the contracting activity (FA4479-10-C-0004).

Wyle Laboratories, Inc., McLean, Va., was awarded a $5,846,052 contract which will provide for the research, test development, and delivery of reliability engineering reports, analysis reports, and technical reports. At this time, $3,411,912 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., is the contracting activity (HC1047-05D-4005).

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

PPG Aerospace Transparencies, Huntsville, Ala., is being awarded a maximum $50,126,406 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-quantity contract for aircraft windshields. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Navy. The original proposal was solicited via the Internet Bid Board System Web site with one response. The date of performance completion is April 29, 2011. The Defense Supply Center Richmond, Richmond, Va., is the contracting activity (SPM4A7-10-D-0193).

DMS Pharmaceutical Group, Inc.*, Park Ridge, Ill., is being awarded a maximum $26,786,177 firm-fixed-price, total set-aside, prime vendor secondary contract for pharmaceutical requirements. There are no other locations of performance. Using services are Army, Navy, and Air Force. The original proposal was Web solicited with four responses. This contract is exercising the second option period. The date of performance completion is Oct. 31, 2012. The Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., is the contracting activity (SPM200-05-D-0902).

Sailors Visit Children's Hospital During Fleet Week Port Everglades


By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Leah Stiles, Fleet Week Media Center

April 30, 2010 - PORT EVERGLADES, Fla. (NNS) -- Sailors from USS Newport News (SSN 750) visited with children from the Joe Dimaggio Children's Hospital April 28 as part of the 20th Anniversary Fleet Week Port Everglades.

The Sailors spent the day visiting several of the different wards to wish the children well and to pass out gifts.

The children grinned as they received stickers and photos of the submarine.

"A little boy and his sister were looking for us as we came down the hallway," said Machinist's Mate 2nd Class (SS) Stephen Lowman. "The little boy was telling us about how he wanted to be on a submarine, it made me feel proud."

The Sailors had the opportunity to do crafts; color pictures and eat lunch with the young children.

"I think it gives them some sense of safety, and a hope of a brighter tomorrow knowing that we're here to protect them," said Machinist Mate 3rd Class (SS) Patrick Gillum.

The hospital visit was part of Fleet Week Port Everglades, South Florida's annual celebration of the maritime services.

Air Force C130s, Navy Equipment to Support Oil Slick Response

By Donna Miles

April 30, 2010 - Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates has authorized two Air Force Reserve C-130H aircraft to support the response to a massive oil slick that threatens wetlands and beaches along the Gulf Coast, Pentagon Press Secretary Geoff Morrell confirmed today. In addition, the Navy has dispatched 66,000 feet of inflatable oil boom with anchoring equipment, along with seven skimming systems and their supporting gear to the region, Navy Lt. Myers Vasquez reported.

The C130 crews, assigned to the 910th Airlift Wing's 757th Airlift Squadron at the Youngstown Air Reserve Station in Ohio, had prepositioned in Mississippi in anticipation of the tasking.

"We are posturing to be ready to provide support to the ongoing emergency efforts if called upon," said Air Force Col. Craig Peters, the 910th Operations Group commander.

Weather currently is hampering the aircraft from operating, Morrell said, but flights could begin as soon as tomorrow.

The aircraft are equipped with Modular Aerial Spray Systems used for aerial spray missions, Air Force Master Sgt. Bob Barko Jr., the wing's public affairs superintendent, told American Forces Press Service.

They are expected to be called on to help disperse the oil slick in accordance with a 1996 memo of understanding between the Air Force and Coast Guard, Air Force officials said.

The 910th is home to the only full-time, fixed-wing, large-area aerial spray unit within the Department of Defense. The unit conducts spray missions at military installations and their surrounding communities, primarily to control biting insects as well as vegetation growth on bombing ranges, Barko said.

However, tests conducted between 1992 and 1994 at the Coast Guard's request demonstrated the unit's capability to apply dispersing materials to oil slicks, such as the one currently threatening the Gulf Coast.

The aerial spray unit trains for this mission, most recently, during a multi-agency international exercise in Brownsville, Texas, in 2008, Barko said.

"This is a situation we have trained for -- for years," Barko said of the Gulf mission. "To have the opportunity to do it in the real world and help folks along the Gulf Coast with this capability is really gratifying for everyone involved."

The Navy equipment, along with 50 civilian operators and maintainers contracted through Naval Sea Systems Command, began arriving yesterday in Gulfport, Miss., from Williamsburg, Va., and Port Hueneme, Calif., Vasquez reported.

The equipment was quickly moved to the Mississippi state dock near Gulfport and put in use at the direction of the federal on-scene coordinator, he said.

Two retired Guard members enter Wisconsin Army National Guard Hall of Honor Sunday

April 30, 2010 - Retired Chief Warrant Officer 4 Douglas H. Alfke of Jackson, Wis., and retired Command Sgt. Maj. Douglas E. Gehrke of Monona, Wis., will join the prestigious Wisconsin Army National Guard Hall of Honor during an induction ceremony at 1 p.m. Sunday (May 2), in Witmer Hall at Joint Force Headquarters, 2400 Wright Street, Madison.

Alfke joined the 32nd Infantry Brigade in 1973 after service in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War. His enlisted career culminated with his assignment as first sergeant of the Red Arrow Brigade Headquarters Company. Upon his later appointment as a warrant officer, he distinguished himself by providing leadership and mentorship to the brigade's commanders, staff and Soldiers. Upon transfer to the State Headquarters, Alfke served as labor relations manager responsible for all Army and Air National Guard labor issues. He retired in 2003 following a 34-year military career.

Gehrke served multiple tours in Vietnam as an artilleryman before joining the Wisconsin Army National Guard, where he enjoyed a long career in the logistics, intelligence and operations fields. He spent the last 10 years of his career in the area of training, and greatly impacted the deployment readiness of 64th Troop Command Soldiers. He retired from the Wisconsin Guard after a combined active duty and Guard career spanning 40 years.

Alfke and Gehrke will join the ranks of 40 individuals who have brought great credit to the state of Wisconsin and to the Wisconsin Army National Guard since the inception of the Hall of Honor 10 years ago. Inductees are chosen by a special committee of current and past Guard Soldiers, based on exceptional achievement, devotion to duty and embodiment of the Army's core values - duty, honor, service, respect, loyalty, integrity and personal courage.

Brig. Gen. Don Dunbar, the Adjutant General of Wisconsin, and Brig. Gen. Mark Anderson, Wisconsin Army National Guard commander, will lead the induction. Attendees include family and friends of the inductees as well as current and retired Guard members.

Pakistan Navy Accepts Two P-3C Aircraft

April 30, 2010 - JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) -- The U.S. Navy transferred two P-3 Orion aircraft to the Islamic Republic of Pakistan in a ceremony at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla., April 30 as part of the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) Program.

"It is indeed a pleasure for me to take part in this elegant ceremony to receive the first upgraded P-3C aircraft for the Pakistani Navy," said Husain Haqqani, Pakistan ambassador to the United States. "This represents the expanding strategic partnership between Pakistan and the United State and will fill an important gap in our country's maritime security by helping us more effectively monitor sea lanes and provide for maritime traffic in the Arabian Sea."

By 2012, the Pakistan Navy will receive a total of eight P-3C aircraft as part of the program. All eight aircraft were procured from the Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) and are being upgraded with modern mission systems and avionics, which will provide Pakistan the capability to conduct maritime patrol in littoral and deep-water environments.

"The induction of the P-3C aircraft into the Pakistan Navy will ensure terrorists, pirates and drug traffickers are unable to use our maritime borders for infiltration and other illegal activities," said Haqqani.

Brig. Gen. Thomas Masiello, deputy assistant secretary of state for plans, programs and operations, Bureau of Political-Military Affairs, served as the senior U.S. official at the ceremony and addressed the audience, full of military, industry and civic leaders.

"Let us remember that the friendship between the United States and Pakistan is not an unbalanced one. Pakistan is a major non-NATO ally that has strongly supported the United States after the attack by Al Qaeda on September 11, 2001," said Masiello. "Now, nearly nine years later, Pakistan commands the multinational coalition of Combined Task Force 150 in its maritime security operations to interdict extremists and support Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. Pakistan's stability and prosperity are in the best interest of people everywhere. Our countries' futures are intertwined – so now, more than ever, their struggles are our struggles."

The United States is fully committed to a stable, long-term strategic partnership with a democratic Pakistan-one based on shared interests and mutual respect that will continue to expand and deepen in future years. The United States and Pakistan share a common goal of a stable and secure South Asia region.

The Pakistan Navy is a critical partner nation in Coalition Maritime Forces operations and fully supports cooperative strategies in the U.S. Central Command Area of Responsibility.

World War II MIAs Identified

April 30, 2010 - WASHINGTON (AFRNS) -- The remains of eight U.S. servicemen, missing in action from World War II, have been accounted-for and returned to their families for burial with full military honors, announced Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office officials.

The group remains of Lt. Jack S. M. Arnett, Charleston, W.V.; Flight Officer William B. Simpson, Winston-Salem, N.C.; Tech. Sgt. Charles T. Goulding, Marlboro, N.Y.; Tech. Sgt. Robert J. Stinson, San Bernardino, Calif.; Staff Sgt. Jimmie Doyle, Lamesa, Texas; Staff Sgt. Leland D. Price, Oakwood, Ohio; and Staff Sgt. Earl E. Yoh, Scott, Ohio, and the individual remains of Lt. Frank J. Arhar, Lloydell, Pa., were buried April 30 in Arlington National Cemetery. The individual remains of Lieutenant Arnett and Sergeants Yoh, Doyle and Stinson were buried earlier by their families.

On Sept. 1, 1944, their B-24J Liberator bomber was shot down while on a bombing mission of enemy targets near Koror, Republic of Palau. Crewmen on other aircraft reported seeing Lieutenant Arnett's aircraft come apart in the air and crash into the sea between Babelthuap and Koror islands. Two parachutes were spotted, but none of the 11-man crew ever returned to friendly territory. An aerial search was unsuccessful, and more thorough recovery operations could not be conducted because of Japanese control of the area.

Post-war Japanese documents established that three other members of the crew survived the crash but died while prisoners of the Japanese. In 1949, the American Graves Registration Service declared the remains of all 11 crew members to be non-recoverable. In October 2000, a team from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command mounted several investigations on Babelthaup Island to attempt to locate several reported mass burial sites. A team returned in November 2001, but their excavation did not recover any material or biological evidence indicating a mass burial. They returned again January 2004, and shortly before the team completed their excavation, they were contacted by a private wreckage hunting group called the "Bent Prop Project" which had discovered the wreckage of a B-24 on the ocean floor four miles northeast of where a diagram from U.S. records indicated a crash site. The JPAC team examined the wreckage and recovered remains.

Divers from JPAC and the U.S. Navy examined the underwater site again in 2005 where they recovered more remains and material evidence. After safely stabilizing the underwater site, the joint JPAC-U.S. Navy team dived on the site again in early 2007 and recovered additional remains. The joint team returned again in 2008 and recovered more remains and evidence.

The use of mitochondrial DNA analysis from the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory, the biological profile of the remains, dental records, material evidence including machine gun serial numbers and identification tags of Lieutenant Arnett and Sergeants Doyle and Yoh enabled JPAC scientists to establish the identifications.

For more information on the Defense Department's mission of accounting for missing Americans, visit the DPMO Web site at www.dtic.mil/dpmo, or call 703-699-1169.

Golf, Life Lessons Available to Military Children

By Elaine Wilson
American Forces Press Service

April 30, 2010 - It's tee time for children from military families, thanks to The First Tee Military Affiliate Program. The program offers free golf instruction to children from National Guard and Reserve families geographically separated from a military base at The First Tee's 200 chapters across the nation.

School-age children at all skill levels, from beginner to advanced, are invited to hone their golf game with the help of trained coaches. The goal is to welcome at least 6,000 participants, defense officials said.

The program not only sharpens children's skills on golf course greens and fairways, but it also provides life skills. Along with basic golf instruction, The First Tee coaches teach children interpersonal communication, managing emotions, goal-setting and overcoming obstacles.

"The First Tee youth development program gets kids outside in fresh air and sunshine, engages them in meaningful activity, and provides the opportunity for individual skill building with group camaraderie," said Barbara Thompson, director of the Defense Department's office of family policy, children and youth. "The First Tee core values mirror the core values of their parents, including honesty, integrity, respect, courtesy, responsibility and perseverance."

To sign up, parents can visit a First Tee chapter in their community or download a coupon for free instruction by visiting The First Tee website, http://www.thefirsttee.org/military. The site also includes a listing of chapter locations.

"We are excited to have this program as an option for military children in or near their communities," Thompson said.

Military children on or near a base, both stateside and overseas, also can benefit from free golf instruction through The First Tee. Some local chapters have teamed up with stateside military youth programs to offer the program to military children.

First Tee officials also are working with some overseas installations to implement its program. The First Tee provides the curriculum and training so the program can run without a nearby chapter.

Military families should contact their local youth center to determine if The First Tee program is in place or coming their way. "We recognize that military children have many interests, and for that reason, we continue to look for a wide variety of opportunities that offer a positive learning experience along with the opportunity for personal growth," Thompson said. "We know also that if it's an activity for children, these opportunities need to include an element of fun."

The First Tee, an initiative of the World Golf Foundation, was created in 1997 as a way of bringing golf to youth who otherwise would not be exposed to the game and its positive values, according to The First Tee website.

Group Links Health Care Providers to VA, Academia

By Jacob Boyer
U.S. Joint Forces Command

April 30, 2010 - The U.S. Joint Forces Command surgeon's office is sponsoring a working group here May 3 and 4 to bring military health care providers together with representatives of the Veterans Affairs Department academic institutions researching cutting-edge medical techniques.

The Restorative Medicine Working Group seeks to examine ways to partner in developing medical technology to further care for wounded warriors, said Navy Rear Adm. (Dr.) Michael H. Mittelman, command surgeon for Joint Forces Command.

The institutions are members of a consortium working with the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine, a partnership between the Defense Department and academic institutions set up in 2008 to fund advanced research in rebuilding human muscle and tissue.

"We're attempting to ensure that returning wounded warriors have access to cutting-edge, controlled medical research and development," Mittleman said. "[Joint Forces Command] is providing a forum so that these academic institutions will be able to present to the services, the VA, and the Tricare Management Activity what they can provide for our wounded warriors.

"It's my goal to set up the active communication between these different groups," he continued, "so that military health care providers will be aware of what's available and feel comfortable to appropriately refer patients to these institutions."

Impetus for the working group came when Marine Corps Gen. James N. Mattis, commander of Joint Forces Command, visited the University of Pittsburgh's McGowan Institute, one of the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine partners, Mittelman said. While Mattis was there, he added, researchers demonstrated some emerging care techniques and Mattis met Marine Corps Cpl. Josh Maloney, recipient of an experimental hand transplant made possible by the partnership.

Defense Department representatives at the forum will meet researchers from partners that include Rutgers University, the University of Pittsburgh's McGowan Institute, Wake Forest University, the Mayo Clinic, Case Western Reserve University's Cleveland Clinic, Johns Hopkins University and Dartmouth College. Military attendees will receive information on which procedures Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine partners currently are researching. The Defense Department representatives then will brief the academic attendees on current initiatives, expectations, and prospective processes for assuring appropriate access to this rapidly growing medical technology.

"There appears to be a lack of awareness in our [Defense Department] medical treatment facilities about these initiatives," Mittelman said. "What we're attempting to accomplish is the establishment of relationships, so the services can educate the academic institutions on the ground rules and the academic institutions will educate us on what they can provide to our wounded warriors and their families.

"Ideally," he continued, "I'd like to see consensus on the development of a clearing house or approval board that would review cases and direct them accordingly."

Mittelman said the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine is doing great work, and it is important that eligible warfighters have access to controlled research protocols.

"We're bringing in military physicians who have the opportunity to refer patients to let them know what's out there and what processes they need to follow," he said. "We can leverage this great science that's out there for our wounded warriors."

Conversely, it is important for the institutions to be aware of what the services expect for patients and their families, Mittelman said.

"We want to ensure the patient will get taken care of," he said. "There has to be outpatient care for many of these cases for months on end. They need a place to put up the patient and his family and have all the necessary support mechanisms, because when we're treating a wounded warrior, we're not just treating them, we're treating their families. It's a total package."

Mittelman said the working group's effectiveness is predicated on spreading awareness on both sides to ensure warfighters get the care they need and cutting-edge techniques develop more rapidly.

"We are here to be the agent for our warfighter to ensure they are getting the best medical care possible, so if I need to be the facilitator for this for a while, I certainly will be," he said. "It all came out of the one meeting at the University of Pittsburgh, but there are other universities doing great work in different venues.

"We want to raise the benchmark for medical treatment," he added. "It's unfortunate that war drives these medical advances, but that's a silver lining of battle medicine. It really drives people to develop new technologies and skill sets."

Official Praises Crew's Response to Iranian Aircraft


By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

April 29, 2010 - Pentagon Press Secretary Geoff Morrell today credited the crew of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower for its disciplined response last week when an Iranian military aircraft flew within 1,000 yards of it in the Gulf of Oman.

An Iranian navy maritime patrol aircraft flew near the carrier April 21 as it had finished routine replenishment-at-sea operations, a Navy official confirmed on background. The aircraft remained in the area for about 20 minutes before it flew away.

The incident occurred as Iranian forces were preparing to conduct exercises in the Gulf.

Morrell played down the incident, saying close encounters aren't all that unusual in the narrow, heavily trafficked Strait of Hormuz. "We operate there. They operate there. Lots of people operate there," he said. "I don't think ... our crews were alarmed by it. I don't think anybody [at the Pentagon] is too worked up about it."

There's been no communication between the United States and Iran about the incident, but Morrell said if the military wanted to contact the Iranians about the incident it would find a way to do so. "But I don't think it is of concern to the Navy ... nor anybody else in this building," he said.

Morrell said the Eisenhower crew's restraint during the incident speaks volumes.

"Thankfully, our crews are incredibly well trained, incredibly disciplined," he said. "And they are very aware of the rules of engagement and the procedures that ... should be taken in circumstances like this, and do an incredible job at avoiding ... risks of accidental or incidental conflict."

Ohio holds family readiness conference

By Sgt. Sean Mathis
Ohio National Guard

Ohio, (4/26/10) -- The Ohio National Guard held its 2010 Family Readiness Conference here at the Columbus Marriott Northwest Hotel April 9-11.

The weekend’s events included awards, recognition and planning for Ohio’s Family Readiness Groups (FRG).

Lt. Col. Robert Bramlish, the state family programs director, said the purpose of the annual conference is to build “relationships among FRGs, unit leadership and organizations committed to supporting our troops and families.”

FRGs provide a support network that assist military families during hardships while loved ones are deployed. They also work closely with the leaders of deployed troops and organizations that support troops to solve issues that military family members face while their loved ones are away.

More than 800 family members, Soldiers and Airmen of the Ohio National Guard attended the three-day conference.

Designed to help foster relationships between troops and FRGs, the first night of the conference was designated with a wellness theme and attendees dressed in related apparel, including medical scrubs, athletic clothing, and even healthy food costumes.

Maj. Gen. Gregory L. Wayt, Ohio adjutant general, dressed as Olympic gold medalist and professional snowboarder Shaun White, donning plastic gold medals, a long, curly, red-haired wig, a black toboggan, aviator sunglasses and a snowboard under his left arm.

“There is tremendous leadership at the top of both the Ohio Army and Air Guards,” said Woody Johnson, host of a popular morning radio show. “For General Wayt to dress up like Shaun White … you want to serve a guy like that. I’m a civilian and I want to serve a guy like that.”

Johnson, who is married to an Ohio Air National Guard member from the 121st Air Refueling Wing, understands the challenges facing military families.

“If I can support their commitment by giving them mine, then I’ll be there for them. It’s kind of my way of saying thanks,” Johnson said.

On April 10, conference attendees broke into smaller groups designed to focus on specific issues and allow for some individual attention.

“Some of these classes may contribute to improved FRG programs in units, while others may focus on maintaining the wellness of all our FRG volunteers, as well as commanders and senior NCOs who, in spite of all which is on their plate, continue to give even more to troops and Families,” Bramlish said.

On April 11, Dennis McCarthy, the assistant secretary of defense for reserve affairs, commended the Ohio National Guard for the success of its Family Readiness Program and answered questions about future changes regarding family programs in the military.

More than 160 children of military members also attended the conference. About 50 children between the ages of six and nine learned the history of the United States military from volunteers dressed in uniforms from the War of 1812 to today’s Global War on Terrorism.

In some classes, children were allowed to wear some of the equipment and experience firsthand what their mothers and fathers wear.

Navy Celebrates 110th Submarine Birthday on Guam

By Jesse Leon Guerrero, Joint Region Marianas Public Affairs

April 30, 2010 - TUMON, Guam (NNS) -- Nearly 500 Sailors, spouses and their guests gathered in celebration of the 110th Submarine Birthday Ball held at the Pacific Islands Club on Guam April 24.

Commander, Submarine Squadron (COMSUBRON) 15 hosted the party for Guam's submarine community.

Rear Adm. Paul Bushong, commander, Joint Region Marianas, delivered remarks as guest speaker. Bushong praised the submariners for their achievements and thanked them for all their support.

Bushong emphasized the importance of submarines in protecting the nation as it provides short-notice response capability for operations throughout the Western Pacific region.

"Just as the submarine force has a proud and distinguished history, Guam has a rich history of submarine operations dating back to World War II," Bushong said. "We stand on the shoulders of those who have gone before us. Take pride in that history and in your contribution to it."

Guam currently is homeport to three Los Angeles-class attack submarines: USS Buffalo (SSN 715), USS City of Corpus Christi (SSN 705) and USS Houston (SSN 713). Crew members from USS Ohio (SSGN 726) (Gold) and visiting USS Asheville (SSN 758) also attended the ball.

Prior to Bushong's remarks, the attendees paused in silence as a video slideshow honored the sacrifices made by submariners lost at sea.

Electronics Technician 2nd Class (SS) Brandon Berry, of USS Houston, provided another highlight of the night when he accepted his submarine warfare specialist insignia in front of his friends and other attendees.

"It makes me as proud as anything, like there is nothing else I want to do," Berry said. "I want to be on a submarine."

Also known as "dolphins," the insignia is worn by both officers and enlisted who have passed proficiency tests for all systems aboard a submarine. As the most junior Sailor to earn the insignia, Berry assisted Bushong and Cmdr. Bruce Deshotel, executive officer of USS Frank Cable and the active duty Sailor present who had longest worn the insignia, in cutting the ceremonial birthday cake.

Fire Control Technician Seaman Edward Gingras III, of USS Ohio, said it was his first time to attend a submarine ball since enlisting 13 months ago. He said he enjoyed the time off with his friends.

"The sub community is nice because you know everybody," Gingras said. "It's a lot more close-knit. That's probably the best thing I like."

The submarine ball commemorates the anniversary of the U.S. Navy's Submarine Force. On April 11, 1900, the U.S. Navy purchased John Philip Holland's revolutionary submarine and renamed it the USS Holland (SS-1), America's first commissioned submarine. Since then, submariners have been patrolling the depths of oceans, taking the fight to enemies and providing maritime security around the world.

Guard Members Prepare for Kentucky Oaks, Derby Races

By Army Capt. Andi Hahn
Kentucky National Guard

April 29, 2010 - The "Fastest Two Minutes in Sports" took five months to plan, and the Kentucky National Guard is no stranger to the Kentucky Derby and Oaks "Run for the Roses." For decades, the Kentucky National Guard has assisted Louisville police and other state and local law enforcement agencies during the annual Kentucky Oaks and Derby horse races held at Churchill Downs here. The Oaks race is traditionally run on the Friday before the Kentucky Derby, which is held on the first Saturday in May.

"When a big event like Derby exceeds Louisville metro's ability to respond, they ask for our assistance," said Army Maj. Lance Grebe, operations officer for the Kentucky National Guard. "We are never out there on our own; our teams are always partnered with a police officer."

This year, 360 Kentucky Guardsmen from the 198th Military Police Battalion, 41st Civil Support Team, 63rd Aviation Brigade, Recruiting and Retention, and various headquarters offices will provide support to the Louisville police tomorrow for the Oaks race, and on this year's Derby Day, May 1. This year marks the 136th running of the Derby.

Military police will man traffic-control points and provide infield and gate security at Churchill Downs. The Kentucky National Guard also will contribute soldiers for a winner's circle security detail, transportation support and a command-and-control presence alongside Louisville police officers.

The Kentucky Guard has worked with local law enforcement and other agencies for numerous training events and real-world incidents such as a winter ice storm and Hurricane Ike. The Kentucky Derby gives Guard members another arena to brush up on their soldier's skills and provide community outreach.

"It's important to continue to build a good working relationship with the [police department]," Grebe said. "Our soldiers, especially the MPs, get refresher training out of it. In the past, during state training events or real-world disasters, it's always been a seamless transition working with the local law officials."

Iwo Jima Takes Damage Control Olympics

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Travis Kuykendall, USS Iwo Jima Public Affairs

April 30, 2010 - PORT EVERGLADES, Fla. (NNS) -- The damage control team from the amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) took first place, for the second time in 3 years, at Fleet Week Port Everglades' 10th Annual Damage Control (DC) Olympics, April 27.

The event tested the knowledge, skills and readiness of each service member in a series of realistic DC scenarios.

"It was exhilarating and definitely got my blood pumping," said Damage Controlman 2nd Class Ray M. Klett. "It's extremely similar to an actual casualty and more realistic than training we receive onboard the ship."

Along with Iwo Jima Sailors, crew members from the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40), the guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78), the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USCGC Key Biscayne (WPB 1339), and the German air defense frigate FGS Hessen (F 221) participated in the DC Olympics.

The event was coordinated by Resolve Marine Group, Inc., a company that trains service members as well as commercial ships and cruise lines in shipboard firefighting and damage control.

"DC Olympics is hosted to honor the Navy, provide competition and present a challenge to Sailors," said Denise Johnston, vice president of Resolve Marine Group. "We also teach tips and tricks to the participants on how to fight fires."

The competition consisted of pipe patching, P-100 relay, search and rescue drill, fire attack, and a relay race testing firefighters' speed in donning protective equipment. The Iwo Jima DC team placed first in three events, second in two and ultimately was chosen as this year's winner.

"We did it back in 2008, so for us it's just a repeat," said Klett. "It will bring morale to the shop and make us feel like we really did accomplish something."

With Iwo Jima's big engineering inspection nearing, a performance like the one today establishes confidence within its Sailors.

"Competition always brings out the best in you so you can compare how you're doing against everyone else," said Lt. j.g. V.J. P. Macasaet, Iwo Jima assistant damage control assistant. "Based on today's results, I think we're doing pretty well. It feels good having the validation knowing you can do the job."

Iwo Jima is participating in the 20th Fleet Week Port Everglades, South Florida's annual celebration of the Maritime Services. More than 2,500 American and German Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen will participate in a number of community outreach activities and enjoy the hospitality and tourism of South Florida.

Klakring, Brazilian Sailors Come Together For Soccer, Cookout

By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Michael J. Scott, CTG 40.0 Public Affairs

April 30, 2010 - FORTALEZA, Brazil (NNS) -- Sailors from the guided missile frigate USS Klakring (FFG 42) and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 42 Det. 10 joined Brazilian sailors in Fortaleza April 22, for a friendly game of soccer and post-game barbeque.

The visit in Fortaleza was the second visit for Klakring during her Southern Seas 2010 deployment.

Once the game began, the language barrier was quickly overcome as everyone understood the rules of soccer.

Yeoman 1st Class Jorge Ulloa served as an interpreter for both sides. He and Brazilian Navy Corporal Cabo Borges shared stories of their careers and the similarities of both navies. He said Klakring Sailors definitely got something from the experience.

"We have a bond now, a friendship with our Brazilian counterparts," Ulloa said. "Friendly competition brings out the best in everyone, and what better time to be in each other's company than when we're at our best."

Brazil won the game, 10-1.

After the game, the two teams enjoyed an old-fashioned American barbeque complete with hamburgers, hot dogs and all the fixings. Klakring's Executive Officer Cmdr. Robin Smith and Culinary Specialist 1st Class James Lawton fired up the grill and did the cooking.

"I enjoy cooking," Smith said. Whenever we light the grill on Klakring, I like to be there. I came here today to help CS1 and enjoy the game."

Sailors from both teams posed with each other for pictures, and some exchanged shirts and more smiles.

"I'm very proud to have been part of this exchange," Ulloa said.

For Klakring and Task Group 40.0, this event was one of many that will take place in the months to come.

Task Group 40.0 is on a six-month deployment to South America and the Caribbean as part of Southern Seas 2010 (SS10). Southern Seas is an annual U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM)-directed operation implemented by U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command (NAVSO) and executed by Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 40 as Commander, Task Group 40.0. Southern Seas focuses on conducting a variety of exercises and multinational exchanges to enhance interoperability, increase regional stability, and build and maintain regional relationships with our partner nations. SS10 includes Klakring, HSL-42 Det. 10, and DESRON 40 serving as the command element.

NAVSO is the naval component command for SOUTHCOM and is responsible for all naval personnel and assets in the area of responsibility. NAVSO conducts a variety of missions in support of the maritime strategy, including theater security cooperation, relationship building, humanitarian assistance and disaster response, community relations, and counter-illicit trafficking operations.

Iwo Jima Sailors Visit Children at Chris Evert Children's Hospital

By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Mavis Tillman, USS Iwo Jima Public Affairs

April 30, 2010 - PORT EVERGLADES, Fla. (NNS) -- Sailors from the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) visited Chris Evert's Children's Hospital at Broward General Medical Center April 27.

The Sailors visited the general pediatric, intensive and emergency care, hematology oncology, labor and delivery and acute neonatal wards.

Each Sailor had a chance to visit, share stories, answer questions, cheer patients up and take pictures. They also met Bernie, the therapeutic dog, which plays with the children to calm them down and minimize their fears.

"As a parent, it makes you appreciate having healthy kids, but on the flip side it warms your heart to bring a smile to a sick child's face," said Legalman 1st Class Marlena Joiner, Iwo Jima legal officer.

Cryptologic Technician Collection 2nd Class Zachariah Adkins signed up early for the event so he could bring some joy to the youngest patients of the hospital.

"I wanted to be the one of the people that helped brighten a child's day," said Adkins.

From curable to incurable illnesses, the youngest patients show their smiles and personalities to Iwo Jima Sailors who want nothing more than to bring a little sunshine to their hospital stay.

"I chose to participate in this community relations project because I wanted to reach out to the children who may not get to meet their heroes, but often dream about becoming part of the armed forces," said Information Technician 2nd Class Vania Yazzie. "Many of these children spend years in the hospital fighting battles of their own. They are a testament to true strength and courage."

This is the 20th Fleet Week Port Everglades, South Florida's annual celebration of the Maritime Services. More than 2,500 American and German Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen will participate in a number of community outreach activities and enjoy the hospitality and tourism of South Florida.

U.S. Flags Salute Wounded Warrior Athletes

By Samantha L. Quigley

April 29, 2010 - The American flags raised over five military installations don't look any different from the one raised over the U.S. Capitol on any given day, but there is one distinct difference.

These flags will bear the well-wishes of servicemembers stationed around the world for injured soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines and veterans competing in the inaugural Warrior Games in Colorado Springs, Colo., next month.

With the help of the Defense Media Activity and the USO, five American flags found their way to Afghanistan, Germany, Hawaii, Iraq and South Korea, where they were raised over military points of interest. One flew above the USS Arizona in Hawaii, and another over Korea's demilitarized zone. A third was raised above Germany's Landstuhl Regional Medical Center. Flags flew over Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, and Joint Base Balad, Iraq, as well.

Each flag-raising was filmed and will be broadcast with special messages from deployed servicemembers during the Warrior Games opening ceremonies.

For one recipient of a flag, what began as a routine assignment to organize and film the flag-raising turned into much more, especially after she called the Landstuhl public affairs office and explained the project.

"Their response was overwhelming," said Air Force Tech. Sgt. Leigh Bellinger, who serves with Detachment 4, Air Force News Agency, at Ramstein Air Base, Germany.

The public affairs team in Germany organized a joint-service detail to raise and lower the flag. The detail practiced for more than an hour the day before the actual flag-raising, Bellinger said.

"It was the afternoon of the actual ceremony that it all hit home," she said. "As I stood in front of those soldiers, Marines, sailors and airmen talking about the flag and the Warrior Games, it hit me -- the importance of what we were doing. This was for our brothers and sisters taking part in the Warrior Games."

Troops injured in overseas combat zones receive treatment at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center before transport to stateside medical facilities. Landstuhl, therefore, "has special significance for every single wounded warrior taking part in the games," Bellinger said. "More than likely, they passed through on their way back home from Iraq or Afghanistan."

Army Staff Sgt. Clinton Carroll, the operations noncommissioned officer in charge for American Forces Network Afghanistan, said the request to fly an American flag wasn't so unusual.

"Because we are in a combat zone, we are asked to fly lots of American flags for different reasons," he said. "Each of them has meaning and importance for someone we don't usually know. This one is unique, because it's flown specifically for our brothers and sisters in arms and in honor of the sacrifice they have made, some of them here in Afghanistan."

Carroll asked soldiers of the 82nd Airborne Division if they'd be willing to participate in the ceremony to raise this special flag.

"Not only did they want to do it, but because they are the 82nd, they wanted to do it big," Carroll said. "They had no issue finding servicemembers to help out with the flag raising ... because of the significance of the event. They also wanted to have a formation spelling out 'USO' to thank everyone for their dedication to the Warrior Games."

Carroll had a message for the athletes participating in the Warrior Games, as well.

"I would say to them, regardless of what branch of service they are in, they are heroes to us all," he said. "I want to wish all the warriors good luck, but I want to especially say, 'Go Army!'"

Bellinger offered the warrior athletes her best wishes, in the form of "a slow, sharp salute for all my brothers and sisters taking part."

Nicholas Tovo, DMA's Hawaii bureau chief, enlisted the help of two wounded warriors who will participate in the Warrior Games to raise the flag over the USS Arizona. Tovo offered a special thanks to everyone who made the flag-raising a success.

"I especially want to thank the servicemembers for participating and everything they have done, and will do, to support our country," he said.

Once the five flags are back in the United States, members of the Rolling Thunder motorcyclist's organization will transport them to the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs in time for the Warrior Games opening ceremonies, scheduled for May 10.

Rolling Thunder works to draw attention to prisoner-of-war and missing-in-action issues and veterans causes. The ride will begin May 5 at the site of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attack in New York City, with stops at the Pentagon and Shanksville, Pa., to honor all 9/11 victims.

The Warrior Games begin May 10 and continue through May 14.

Airman Manages Learning Resources


By Air Force Master Sgt. Scott Sturkol
380th Air Expeditionary Wing

April 29, 2010 - Air Force Tech. Sgt. Oswald Steley does everything he can to provide servicemembers deployed here with morale, welfare, recreation and education support. Steley is the manager of the 380th Expeditionary Force Support Squadron's learning resources center here, where servicemembers can check out movies, educational material, music and language CDs and fictional, biography and reference books. He works six-days-a-week, 12-hours-a-day.

"The [learning resource center] is a morale-booster for all our deployed troops," said Steley, who is deployed from the 60th Force Support Squadron at Travis Air Force Base, Calif. "It helps improve the quality of life for people who are far from home by providing movies for entertainment, educational material for college work, training resources for learning a new language and a whole lot more."

Steley not only maintains a hefty volume of material for the center, but also provides on-the-spot customer service.

"I have a lot of customers who come in and tell me it makes them feel a little more at home by having the LRC available to them," Steley said. "I'll usually help them find what they need, tell them a little about what we have available, and make sure their visit was a successful one."

As a services craftsman, Steley supports more than 1,900 deployed servicemembers for the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing. Support programs cover a variety of areas, and Steley has to be ready to support any one of them in addition to managing the center. Services airmen manage and direct programs, operations and retail sales.

They also supervise and work in appropriated-fund food service and lodging activities, recreation, fitness and sports programs, linen-exchange operations, mortuary affairs programs, honor guard teams and services readiness programs.

They also identify facility requirements and conduct surveys to determine renovation, construction and modernization needs, the job description states. In deployed locations, they establish and supervise bare-base facilities that provide food, fitness, lodging, sports management, recreation, laundry, mortuary services and field exchange operations.

In all the services functions, Steley has to maintain mandatory job knowledge in areas such as accounting procedures, management principles, merchandising, marketing, automated information systems, food service facility operations, subsistence management, requisition and issue procedures, menu planning and lodging operations.

"I've done a lot of different jobs in my more than 15 years in this career field," Steley said. "In services, we work in many different places, and I know all of them. I think the most rewarding for me though was working for eight years as a fitness trainer."

Steley said he wanted to see the world when he left his hometown of Metter, Ga., to join the military.

"Being deployed applies to my original goals to see the world," Steley said. "I've been able to see different cultures and experience the diversity. I've been able to see a lot and have enjoyed every bit of it. I'm glad I joined."

The technical sergeant added that he always has been proud to serve and will proudly continue to do so.

"I serve now so my son doesn't have to," Steley said, expressing the importance of defending America's freedoms, to include freedom of choice. "It will be a choice for him like it was for me."