Military News

Thursday, September 24, 2009

Wounded Veterans Find Therapy in Sports Clinic

By Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael J. Carden
American Forces Press Service

Sept. 24, 2009 - More than 60 wounded veterans suffering disabilities ranging from post-traumatic stress to amputations are learning "to live again" this week through competition at the 2nd Annual National Veterans Summer Sports Clinic in San Diego. The clinic is sponsored by the Department of Veterans Affairs and features surfing, cycling, sailing, kayaking and track and field events. It began Sept. 20 and goes through tomorrow.

Veterans are experiencing the value of recreational therapy, many of whom haven't been physically active since they were injured.

"For the longest time after my injury, I was kind of homebound, not doing anything recreational," said Marc Lavigne, a 32-year-old Army veteran suffering from traumatic brain injury. "The clinic is really teaching me to get out there and live again and really enjoy life."

Lavigne is unable to work and receives 100 percent disability compensation from VA. He was injured performing maintenance on a vehicle while he was stationed at Fort Stewart, Ga., in 1999. He was knocked unconscious when the jack-stand supporting the vehicle gave way.

His recreational therapist at the San Diego VA recommended the clinic to him. Lavigne, a former high school swim team captain, became more excited than he'd been in years, he said.

"It's really a blast," he said. "I never pictured myself surfing, and it was one of the best times I've ever had. Competing here really does show that I can get out there and do things; it might take a little more work than it used to, but I now know I can."

Kevin McCoy, a 39-year-old Army veteran suffering from combat-related mental and physical injuries shares Lavigne's enthusiasm. He's been looking forward to the competition for the past six months, he said.

McCoy has had several surgeries on both of his ankles due to an accident he had repelling out of a helicopter while deployed to Bosnia. McCoy once loved to run, he said, and before participating in the clinic, hadn't done so since April 3, 2006. He ran five miles that day and had his first ankle surgery the next. He hasn't been physically active since.

"The last time I ran was the day before my first surgery, and to be able to have my heart rate going and my blood flowing again was just great," he said. "I feel like we can do anything now."

The clinic also provides veterans with a chance to share their stories and experiences. Competition and esprit de corps goes a long way toward recovery, McCoy said, adding that the camaraderie he once felt as an Army sniper and cavalry scout is something he misses in his new life as veteran and college student.

The opportunity to bond with other veterans and learn their struggles has given him a new sense of motivation to confront and overcome his disabilities, he said.

"The competition is great and being a former scout, we were always on the edge and pushed our bodies to the limit, so to be out here with other folks with disabilities, and to be able to have that competitiveness and esprit de corps back makes a huge difference in our attitudes," he said.

DoD Announces Requirement for New Aerial Tanker Competition

By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service

Sept. 24, 2009 - The needs of warfighters and value for taxpayers are at the heart of the new draft request for proposal for aerial refueling capability, Deputy Defense Secretary William J. Lynn said here today. Lynn, Air Force Secretary Michael B. Donley and Ashton B. Carter, defense undersecretary for acquisition, technology and logistics, briefed the Pentagon press on the draft RFP to replace the Air Force's aging KC-135R tanker fleet.

This is the second time the contract has been competed. The Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, recommended that the Air Force re-bid the contract – originally won by a Northrop-Grumman/EADS/Airbus consortium in February 2008. Boeing protested the decision, and in June 2008 the GAO agreed that there were irregularities in the contracting process.

The GAO said the previous process for selecting a winner was too subjective. DoD took this to heart, and officials stressed this draft RFP is not a rerun of the last competition.

"This time we will be crystal clear about what we want and what the bidders need to do to win," Lynn said.

Price is important in the competition, but it will not be the only factor, Lynn said. "First of all, we'll look at price from a broad perspective, not just acquisition cost," he said. "We're going to include certain aspects of life-cycle cost, in particular fuel burn and military construction; and we're going to look at non- price factors, particularly how each aircraft that the companies might bid would meet warfighting requirements."

DoD and Air Force officials worked closely together to ensure the process this time will be fair, open and transparent. Air Force and DoD officials developed the source selection strategy and it has been approved by Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates.

"The Air Force source selection authority will execute this strategy," Lynn said.

The warfighter requirements – devised by Air Mobility Command – for the tanker fleet have not changed since the last procurement try. "But the warfighter has specified which requirements are necessary for the tanker to 'go to war on Day 1,'" he said.

These requirements are on an acceptable/not acceptable basis, he said. The team has also identified capabilities that would provide some additional value, but are not mandatory.

The buy is for 179 aircraft valued at around $35 billion. If all goes as planned the contract could be awarded next summer. The draft RFP will hit the streets tomorrow. It will be a fixed-price incentive contract in the development phase, and the first five production lots will be a firm fixed-price contract. The remaining production will be a not-to-exceed contract.

"This is going to constrain prices considerably, we believe," Lynn said. "It's shifting the department from a cost-plus world more towards a fixed-price world, and we think that that's going to be an important element in avoiding cost overruns."

Air Force Secretary Donley said the newest KC-135R entered the Air Force in 1964. The first production model of whatever aircraft is selected would enter the force in 2015 with an initial operating capability set for 2017.

Donley said the defense and Air Force teams reviewed the 808 requirements the old RFP had.

"We conducted extensive reviews of the requirements, eliminating duplication, refining definitions, combining where appropriate and ensuring all requirements were measurable," Donley said.

The draft RFP has 373 mandatory requirements. Still there is some value in non-mandatory capabilities, and Donley said the team identified 93 of these added-value capabilities and assigned points to them.

The defense officials said they want to make the selection process as objective as possible. The RFP spells out exactly what warfighting capabilities are needed, but also details what efficiencies are desired, said Undersecretary Carter. To test warfighting effectiveness, evaluators fly each of the offeror's aircraft against he Integrated Fleet Aerial Refueling Assessment model, Carter said.

The model posits a situation where the United States is executing several major war plans simultaneously, and tanker demand is at a peak. The model will answer the question of how many tanker aircraft are needed to execute these real-world war plans.

But there is another consideration: The cost of ownership, Carter said.

"These are the elements, of the life-cycle cost of the tanker, that are under the control of the offerors and which therefore can fairly be used to discriminate the offerors," he said. "The vendors do determine the aircraft design, which in turn determines how much fuel they will burn, over the next 40 years, carrying out the day-to-day tasks."

Military construction projects needed to accommodate the aircraft are also taken under consideration, he said. Costs to adjust hangars, ramps, taxiways and runways for the aircraft will be taken into account.

"So both wartime effectiveness and peacetime efficiency we will assess for each aircraft," Carter said. "We will 'dollarize' those assessments and in dollar terms adjust the bid prices.

MILITARY CONTRACTS September 24, 2009

NAVY
DWG & Associates, Inc.*, Clearwater, Fla., (N69450-09-D-1774); Lake Moultrie Construction, Inc.*, Bamberg, S.C., (N69450-09-D-1775); Mitchell Brothers Inc.*, St. Helena Island, S.C., (N69450-09-D-1776); SBG, Inc.*, Ladson, S.C., (N69450-09-D-1777); GSC Construction, Inc.*, Augusta, Ga., (N69450-09-D-778); Military & Federal Construction Company, Inc.*, Jacksonville, N.C., (N69450-09-D-1779); IronBridge Construction, Inc.*, Chesterfield, Va., (N69450-09-D-1780) are each being awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple award design-bid-build construction contract for general building type projects at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, (45 percent); Marine Corps Air Station, Beaufort (45 percent); and Naval Hospital, Beaufort, (10 percent). The general building type projects include new construction, renovation, alteration, and repair of facilities and infrastructure, roofing, demolition, and routine renovation. The maximum dollar value, including the base period and two option years, for all seven contracts combined is $100,000,000. Work will be performed in Beaufort, S.C., (45 percent) and Parris Island, S.C., (45 percent), and work is expected to be completed September 2012. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website, with 25 proposals received. These seven contractors may compete for task orders under the terms and conditions of the awarded contract. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, Jacksonville, Fla., is the contracting activity.

Sierra Nevada Corp., Sparks, Nev., is being awarded an $80,613,182 modification to previously awarded (N00024-09-C-6306) to exercise Option CLIN (contract line item number) 0003 for production systems including shipping containers and ancillary equipment and cables for 1,300 dismounted joint counter radio-controlled improvised explosive device (RCIED) electronic warfare (JCREW) systems. Dismounted JCREW systems are electronic jammers designed to prevent the initiation of RCIED. This contract is for the procurement and support of JCREW systems, to be used by forces in each of the military services of the Central Command area of responsibility. The Navy manages the joint CREW program for Office of the Secretary of Defense's Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization. Work will be performed in Sparks, Nev., (90 percent); Rancho Cordova, Calif., (10 percent), and is expected to be completed by December 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Sodexho Management, Inc., Gaithersburg, Md., is being awarded a $78,931,079 modification (P00066) which exercises the 3rd Option Year to provide funding and authorizes performance of Contract Year 8 (FY10 requirements) to previously awarded fixed-price-incentive contract (M00027-02-C-0001) to provide food services to the Marine Corps and manage and operate their mess halls in the eastern region of the United States. This modification does not include any funding for work that is outside the scope of the original contract. Work will be performed in Washington D.C.; (5 percent); Arlington, Va., (5 percent); Quantico, Va., (15 percent); Norfolk, Va., (5 percent); Jacksonville, N.C., (40 percent); Havelock, N.C., (5 percent); Parris Island, S.C., (20 percent); and Beaufort, S.C., (5 percent), and is expected to be completed by Sept. 30, 2010. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Contract years 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 (the five year base period and two option period) total $508,051,250. The Regional Contracting Office (Southeast), Marine Corps Base (MCB) Camp Lejeune, N.C., is the contracting activity.

Amee Bay, LLC, Anchorage, Alaska is being awarded an $48,492,977 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus fixed-fee contract for the acquisition of engineering, technical, logistic and installation support services, including the engineering and technical support personnel and facilities, required to support all Navy and submarine and surface ship hull, mechanical and electrical systems and propulsion equipment. In addition, the contractor will also provide support to foreign navies via the Foreign Military Sales program. This contract is operated under the Small Business Administration using the authority of Section 8(a) of the Small Business Act. Work will be performed at various locations within the Continental United States and outside Continental United States, and is expected to be completed by March 2015.. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, Ship System Engineering Station, Philadelphia, Pa., is the contracting activity (N65540-09-D-0040).

General Electric, Lynn, Mass., is being awarded a $47,148,749 requirements contract for repair of T-64 engine components used on the CH53D/E and MH53E helicopters. Work will be performed in Lynn, Mass., and work is expected to be completed by June 2011. Contract funds will not expire before the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Inventory Control Point is the contracting activity (N00383-09-D-005M).

L-3 Communications Vertex Aerospace LLC, Madison, Miss., is being awarded a $44,489,426 modification to a previously awarded indefinite-delivery requirements contract (N00019-05-D-0023) to exercise an option for logistics support for 126 TH-57B/TH-57C aircraft. Work will be performed at Naval Air Station Whiting Field, Milton, Fla., (99 percent) and NAS Patuxent River, Md., (1 percent), and is expected to be completed in September 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

Honeywell International, Inc., Albuquerque, N.M., is being awarded a $30,868,286 modification to definitize a previously awarded undefinitized contract action (N00019-09-C-0004) to a firm-fixed-price contract. In addition, this modification provides for the procurement of an additional 46 Block II micro aerial vehicle systems for the Navy (40) and the United Kingdom (6), with associated spare parts, engineering support services, and training. This contract combines purchases for the U.S. Navy ($28,242,266; 91.5 percent) and the United Kingdom ($2,626,020; 8.5 percent) under the Foreign Military Sales program. Work will be performed in Alburquerque, N.M., and is expected to be completed in September 2011. Contract funds in the amount of $299,717 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

Del-Jen, Inc., Gardena, Calif., is being awarded $23,127,300 modification under a previously awarded firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N69450-07-D-0770) to exercise the second option period for base operations support services at Naval Air Station Pensacola and surrounding areas (Saufley Field, Corry Station, and Bronson Field). The current total contract amount after exercise of this option will be $69,728,751. Work will be performed in Pensacola, Fla., and work is expected to be completed Sept. 30, 2010. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southeast, Jacksonville, Fla., is the contracting activity.

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Bethpage, N.Y., is being awarded a $22,999,043 firm-fixed-price order against a previously issued basic ordering agreement (N00421-05-G-0001) for spares in support of two E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) Lot 1 aircraft. Spares include two Quick Engine Change Kits; two T-56-A-427A engines; one Rotodome; and consumables. Work will be performed in Indianapolis, Ind., (30.9 percent); Bethpage, N.Y., (27.8 percent); Menlo Park, Calif., (23.9 percent); Springville, Utah, (7.5 percent); St. Augustine, Fla., (1.8 percent); and at various locations within the United States (8.1 percent), is expected to be completed in May 2013. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

Systems Application & Technologies, Inc.*, Oxnard, Calif., is being awarded a $17,964,468 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-award-fee contract (N68936-09-C-0003) for additional operational, maintenance, and technical services for the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division Ranges Department. These requirements include preparation of land targets and target areas, operations and maintenance of range instrumentation/communication systems, frequency monitoring, field power systems (fuel-powered generators and photo-voltaic systems), photo-electronics (maintenance and repair of video equipment, cameras, tracking mount trailers, and domes), land targets, range scrap removal, ordnance removal and cleanup, range scheduling and billing, meteorology, operational support, stand-by maintenance, and post-operation analysis of test data. The estimated level of effort for this modification is 384,090 man-hours. Work will be performed in China Lake, Calif., (70 percent), and Point Mugu, Calif., (30 percent) and is expected to be completed in September 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake, Calif., is the contracting activity.

Raytheon Systems Co., McKinney, Texas, is being awarded an $11,715,755 firm-fixed-price order under Basic Ordering Agreement for multi-spectral targeting systems (MTS) for the Navy and associated line items in support of the MH-60 Romeo and Sierra multi-mission combat helicopters. The MTS is a forward looking infrared system for the MH-60 helicopters. The MTS provides real-time imagery selectable between infrared and day TV as well as a laser designation capability. Work will be performed in McKinney, Texas, and is expected to be complete by February 2011. The order under the BOA was awarded on a sole source basis. Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity (N00164-06-G-8555).

Oroday, Inc., Newbury Park, Calif., is being awarded a $10,257,729 modification under a previously awarded time and materials, indefinite-delivery contract (N00244-08-D-0039) to exercise option year one for instructional, administrative, and academic program support services for the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, Calif. Work will be performed in Monterey, Calif., (95 percent) and Newbury Park, Calif., (5 percent), and work is expected to be completed by September 2010. Contract funds in the amount of $3,500,000 will expire before the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was awarded competitively through Navy Electronic Commerce Online website as a small business set-aside with two offers received. The Fleet and Industrial Supply Center San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity.

Capitol Technology Services Inc., – Consolidated Engineering*, Washington, D.C., is being awarded a $9,888,355 modification under a previously awarded firm-fixed price, indefinite-delivery award fee/award option contract (N40083-08-D-0066) to exercise option two for base operating and support services at Naval Support Activity Mid-South and Naval Warfare Center, Carderock Division. The total contract amount after exercise of this option will be $27,456,726. This contract also contains four additional unexercised option periods, which if exercised, would increase cumulative contract value to $100,217,696. Work will be performed in Millington, Tenn., (95 percent) and Memphis, Tenn., (5 percent), and is expected to be completed by Sept. 2010. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Midwest, Great Lakes, Ill., is the contracting activity.

Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc., McLean, Va., is being awarded a $9,836,377 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract (N00421-06-C-0003) to exercise an option for technical, engineering, professional and management support services for the Special Communications Requirements Division of the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division in support of the Department of Defense, Joint Service, and federal agencies programs. The estimated level of effort for this modification is 131,823 man-hours. Work will be performed in Lexington Park, Md., (80 percent) and St. Inigoes, Md., (20 percent), and is expected to be completed in April 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, St. Inigoes, Md., is the contracting activity.

Electric Boat Corp., Groton, Conn., is being awarded a $9,726,520 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-09-C-2100) for Common Missile Compartment prototype material procurement, manufacturing, and test. Work will be performed in Groton, Conn. and is expected to be completed by September 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Dimensions Construction, Inc.*, Riverside, Calif., is being awarded $7,034,832 for firm-fixed price task order #0002 under a previously awarded multiple award construction contract (N62473-09-D-1614) for the design and construction of a mess hall dining facility at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton. The contract also contains a planned modification, which if issued would increase cumulative contract value to $8,459,832. Work will be performed in Oceanside, Calif., and is expected to be completed by Apr. 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Four proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity.

Solpac Construction, Inc., dba Soltek Pacific Construction Co., San Diego, Calif., is being awarded $6,675,000 for firm-fixed-price task order #0012 under a previously awarded multiple award construction contract (N62473-08-D-8615) for construction of an education facility at the Naval Post Graduate School, Monterey. The work to be performed provides for construction of a multi-story structure consisting of housing classrooms for the School of Business and Public Policy and any incidental related work. The task order also contains one planned modification, which if issued would increase cumulative task order value to $7,022,000. Work will be performed in Monterey, Calif., and is expected to be completed by Nov. 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Three proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity.

Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc., McLean, Va., is being awarded a $6,492,099 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract (N00421-06-C-0002) to exercise an option for systems engineering and analysis and technical management services in support of the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division's Identification Systems Division. The estimated level of effort for this option is 109,760 man-hours. Work will be performed in St. Inigoes, Md., and is expected to be completed in September 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, St. Inigoes, Md., is the contracting activity.

Lockheed Martin Systems Integration, Owego, N.Y., is being awarded a $6,444,966 modification to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N00019-04-C-0028) for the procurement of additional common cockpit components for the MH-60R and MH-60S helicopters. Work will be performed in Owego, N.Y., and is expected to be completed in April 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md. is the contracting activity.

AIR FORCE
Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc., of Herndon, Va., was awarded a $44,999,065 contract which will provide the Army intelligence and security command force management, transformation development, strategic planning, operations, and all-source threat intelligence analysis. At this time, $7,890,659 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska is the contracting activity (SP0700-03-D-1380, DO: 0339).

Lear Siegler Services Inc., of Gaithersburg, Md., was awarded a $36,480,912 contract which will exercise option year three of the contract for contractor logistics support for the C-26B aircraft for the RC-26B aircraft for the Army National Guard, consisting of maintenance, repair, and support functions for the period of Oct. 1, 2009 through Sept. 30, 2010. At this time no money has been obligated. 727 ACSG/PKC, Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma is the contracting activity (FA8106-07-C-0004, P00070).

Environmental Tectonics Corp., of Southhampton, Penn., was awarded a $34,444,420 contract which will provide 1) a single centrifuge system for operational research, qualification testing, and high G centrifuge training for operational and aero-medical aircrew b) related data; and c) interim contractor support and replenished spares. There are also two priced options for contractor logistics support plus one priced option for contractor logistics support transition and training. At this time, the entire amount has been obligated. 577 AESG/PK, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8626-09-C-2060).

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., San Diego, Calif., was awarded a $24,010,788 contract which will provide initial lay-in of spares parts for Global Hawk systems sustainment. At this time the entire amount has been obligated. 303d AESG/SYK, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8620-08-G-3005, DO 0016).

Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc., of Herndon, Va., was awarded a $17,900,333 contract which will provide command and control survivability analysis and integration for 24th Air Force. At this time, $710,000 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., is the contracting activity (SP0700-03-D-1380, DO: 0341).

Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc. of Herndon, Virginia was awarded a $14,491,612 contract which will provide survivability/vulnerability modeling and simulation analysis for information operations, command and control and communications. At this time, $200,000 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska is the contracting activity. (SP0700-03-D-1380, DO: 0340).

InDyne Incorp., of Reston, Va., was awarded a $14,095,664 contract which will provide Eglin Test and Training Complex range operations and maintenance of test and training areas and technical facilities to include test and training mission support, engineering support for range system design/modification/range configuration and range support services to accomplish authorized range activities. At this time, no money has been obligated. AAC/PKET, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is the contracting activity (FA9200-05-C-0001, P00039).

Battelle Memorial Institute of Columbus, Ohio was awarded a $9,844,183 contract which will investigate, analyze, and enhance the Kirtland Air Force Base chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear readiness and response program, emergency response education/training exercises, and advance techniques for CBRN risk characterization, risk assessment, risk mitigation, and risk management. At this time, $275,000 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska is the contracting activity (SP0700-00-D-3180, DO: 0622).

Battelle Memorial Institute of Columbus, Ohio was awarded a $9,628,899 contract which will provide technical and analytical defense research consisting of capabilities development, studies, analysis, experimentation, and demonstration to identify and address capability gaps in doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership and education personnel and facilities. At this time, $179,971 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., is the contracting activity (SP0700-00-D-3180, DO:0621).

General Dynamics Advance Information System, of San Clara, Calif., was awarded a $8,794,601 contract which will procure counterspace plug in production units and spares kits which provide the warfighter counter space capability. At this time, $8,794,601 has been obligated. SMC/SSSW, El Segundo, Calif., is the contracting activity (FA8819-07-C-0004, P00009).

Honeywell International Incorporated of Clearwater, Fla., was awarded a $7,104,300 contract which will provide 82 Embedded Global Positing System Inertial Navigation System (EGI) production units and 52 EGI mounts. At this time, $793,400 has been obligated. 647 AESS/PK, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8626-06-C-2065,P00112).

Northrop Grumman Mission Systems of Clearfield, Utah was awarded a $6,360,297 contract which will support the RS/RV programmer time processor pathfinder. At this time, the entire amount has been obligated. 526 ICBMS/PKE, Hill Air Force Base, Utah is the contracting activity (F42610-98-C-0001).

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY
Caterpillar Inc., Mossville, Ind., is being awarded a maximum $9,032,311 fixed price with economic price adjustment, long term contract for tractor crawler. Other location of performance is Illinois. Using service is Navy. There were originally four proposals solicited with two responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is June 30, 2010. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM500-01-D-0059-0364).

Man Diesel North America, Inc., Houston, Texas is being awarded a maximum $7,061,315 firm fixed price, sole source, definite quantity contract for diesel engines. Other location of performance is in England. Using service is Navy. There was originally one proposal solicited with one response. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is June 2011. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Mechanicsburg, Mechanicsburg, Pa., (N00104-08-C-PA61).

Fraga Group USA, Greenbelt, Md.*, is being awarded a minimum $6,944,000 fixed price with economic price adjustment contract for diesel fuel. Other location of performance is Sao Tome, Africa. Using service is Army. There were originally eight proposals solicited with four responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Oct. 31, 2012. The contracting activity is the Defense Energy Support Center, Fort Belvoir, Va., (SP0600-09-D-9410).

L-3 Communications Avionics Systems, Inc., Grand Rapids, Mich., is being awarded a maximum $5,838,730 fixed price with economic price adjustment, sole source, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contract for calibration test set. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Army. There was originally one proposal solicited with one response. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Dec. 31, 2015. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Huntsville, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., (SPRRA1-09-D-0055).

Leaders Take New Missile Defense Plan to Congress

By Gerry J. Gilmore
American Forces Press Service

Sept. 24, 2009 - President Barack Obama's decision to restructure a previous missile defense plan designed to protect Europe from a possible ballistic missile attack from Iran provides a more effective, flexible system that will take less time to implement, senior Pentagon officials said on Capitol Hill today. "We are confident that our new approach represents a dramatic improvement over the program of old," Undersecretary of Defense for Policy Michele Flournoy told Senate Armed Services Committee members.

Under the previous plan developed by the Bush administration in 2007, the United States would emplace missile-tracking radar units in the Czech Republic and 10 interceptor missiles in Poland. The purpose of the system, officials said, is to protect Europe from potential ballistic missile attacks from the Middle East, specifically Iran.

Obama announced a change in plans Sept. 17. Switching to existing ship- and ground-based radars and using the Standard Missile 3 as an interceptor that can be launched from U.S. Navy Aegis-equipped ships or from land, he said, provides "greater defenses against the threat of missile attack than the 2007 European missile defense program."

By implementing the new plan, "we'll be able to protect vulnerable parts of Europe and the tens of thousands of U.S. troops stationed there by the end of 2011," Flournoy said. "And, we'll be creating a far more flexible and adaptive missile defense system, one that can adapt to provide better protection against emerging threats."

The previous European missile defense plan couldn't be put into operation "until at least 2017," Flournoy said.

New intelligence data, she said, helped to drive the decision to change the program.

"The intelligence community now assesses that the threat from Iran's short- and medium-range ballistic missiles is developing more rapidly than previously projected," Flournoy said, "while the threat of potential Iranian intercontinental ballistic missiles, or ICBMs, has been somewhat slower to develop than previously estimated."

Therefore, Flournoy said, in the near term "the greatest missile threats from Iran will be to our allies and our partners, and U.S. deployed personnel and their families, in the Middle East and in Europe." That concern, she said, is all the more urgent because of Iran's continued uranium-enrichment program.

The new missile-defense system is based on proven Standard Missile 3 interceptors, Flournoy explained, which can be launched from both U.S. Navy Aegis ships and from land.

"This means greater geographic flexibility, greater survivability and greater scalability in response to an evolving threat," she said. "That's exactly what we mean by a phased, adaptive approach."

Meanwhile, Flournoy said, the United States has "sufficient capability" to deter any Iranian long-range missile threat for many years to come.

Obama approved the new European missile-defense program, Flournoy said, upon the unanimous recommendations of Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates and Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

In late 2006, Gates recommended to then-President George W. Bush that the United States place radar units in the Czech Republic and 10 ground-based missile interceptors in Poland. But, that was when intelligence officials had gauged Iran's work on developing longer-range ballistic missiles as being the greater threat.

The new missile-defense plan, Flournoy said, also "greatly increases our ability to work with our European allies and our partners to strengthen extended deterrents and our mutual defenses."

The United States, Flournoy said, is now consulting with allies Poland and the Czech Republic about their potential roles in the new missile-defense program.

The Russian government, which had been opposed to the previous European missile-defense plan, seems to like the new one better.

"While we certainly welcome Russian interest in the new approach, as well as potential Russian cooperation in sharing data from their radars, this is not about Russia," Flournoy said of the rationale to change the structure of the European missile defense plan.

"Regardless of Russian reaction, we will continue to do whatever it takes to ensure the security and defense of our European allies," she said.

Flournoy was accompanied at the Senate hearing by Marine Corps Gen. James E. Cartwright, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; and Army Lt. Gen. Patrick J. O'Reilly, director of the Defense Department's Missile Defense Agency.

Providing an effective overseas-based anti-ballistic-missile deterrent is a necessary requirement, Cartwright said, that's "emerging as the greatest need that we have today, that we face out there against these short- and medium-range ballistic missiles."

O'Reilly attested to the capabilities of the SM-3 interceptor missile that plays such an important role in the new program.

The SM-3 interceptor "is a very capable weapon due to its high acceleration, burn velocity and its proven track record," O'Reilly said. Using the SM-3, he said, also provides an "ability to rapidly increase to over 80 interceptors at any one launch site."

Widow Finds Comfort in Military Community

By Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael J. Carden
American Forces Press Service

Sept. 24, 2009 - Melina Nolte and her 8-year-old daughter Alanna call this quaint Carolina town home, but not because of its close proximity to the beach or its southern hospitality. They chose Havelock because it's the last place their Marine Corps family was together. Like many survivors of fallen servicemembers, the Nolte's chose to hold on to their military community because it's familiar and offers a strong support system. Military communities give widows and survivors a sense of family when they need it most, Nolte said.

"Just the familiarity of going on base and shopping and seeing Marines, you're just reminded every day that they're there," she said.

Havelock is a small community just outside the gates of Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point. Melina, Alanna and Marine Corps Sgt. Nicholas Nolte were stationed here for less than a year before Nicholas was deployed to Iraq. He was a loving husband and father whose life was cut short at 25 when he was mortally wounded November 2004 in Anbar province.

Melina was heartbroken and exhausted with grief. She savored the memories of outings her young family shared on the beaches and nearby national parks. Nicholas loved the outdoors, but more than anything, he loved being a father, she said.

"[Nicholas] was a really special guy," she said. "He loved the outdoors and rock climbing. He was the kind of guy who always made everyone laugh. He loved being a dad."

Nicholas was medically evacuated to a military hospital in Germany, and then transferred to Bethesda Naval Hospital, Md., He fought hard for his life for 15 days after the roadside bomb struck his up-armored vehicle, but ultimately died of an infection, Melina said.

The young couple's four-year marriage ended too abruptly and violently for Melina and Alanna to stay in North Carolina, she said. She longed for a fresh, new start and thought that leaving her Marine Corps life behind was the best thing for her daughter, who was only three then.

Shortly after burying Nicholas next to his father's grave in Falls City, Neb., they moved to Melina's hometown in Keene, N.Y.

"I just wanted to start over and figure out what I needed to do with my life now," she said.

Soon after the move, Melina realized that upstate New York didn't share her same admiration for service men and women. Her family and friends were mostly supportive, but Melina became disgusted with the overall lack of appreciation for the military she found there, she said.

"When I went back to New York, everyone who found out how I became a widow would say, 'what a waste' or something negative towards the military," she said. "I'd say my husband died serving his country, and they'd respond, 'I'm sorry,' then 'what a waste.' They weren't supportive of the military at all, and I needed people to believe in what he died for."

New York wasn't home anymore. She started to realize that North Carolina was her home, and even more to her surprise, she realized that the Marine Corps was where she and Alanna belonged. Nicholas loved the Corps, and after a little more than a year away from it, Melina was beginning to understand why, she added.

"I felt like I needed to be around the Marine Corps because of their toughness and discipline," she said. "I felt like that was instilled in me."

Melina found a house near Cherry Point and settled here. Many of her friends are Marines, and many of Alanna's friends are children of Marines. They frequently do their shopping on base, and civilians here appreciate the sacrifices her family made.

"Down here, people are a little more apt to say 'thank you for your service,'" she said. "We were able to be more proud of Nicholas, and there was more support. Back home, they didn't get it."

It's been nearly five years since Nicholas passed away, the last three of which Melina and Alanna have lived in North Carolina. Melina, 31, said she'll always have a connection to the Marine Corps, but confesses that she hopes to one day become less dependent on the military, she said.

"I think I'll get to the point one day to where I can leave here," she explained. "Being here helps, and as time goes on, I think it gets easier to let go."

Servicemembers Can Weather Financial Storm

By Samantha L. Quigley
American Forces Press Service

Sept. 24, 2009 - Servicemembers and their families can weather the "perfect storm" of credit, savings and banking crises; bailouts; market instability; and foreclosures, if they stay financially prepared, the Pentagon's personal finance director said here recently. Dave Julian urged those attending the Defense Department Joint Family Readiness Conference here earlier this month to save more than the average American.

"Back before [the recession], the average American spent $1.22 for every dollar they made," Julian said. "If you put that in real dollars, you make $30,000 a year, you're spending close to $37,000.

"The bottom line is, that's the average American and we can't have our servicemembers and families ... afford to be average," he added. "Their work is far too important. They mean too much to us to let them fall into those kinds of traps that are out there that snare most Americans."

A recent report published in the American Psychological Association said money is a "top source of stress for adults," he said.

Many people don't understand how credit affects their lives, and lead to unhealthy coping behaviors, a loss of sleep, strained personal and professional relationships and other long- and short-term health effects, Julian said.

Studies also have linked financial stress as a factor in suicides, he said.

"The Army did say in 2006, [in] 11 percent of the suicides they had, finances were a known stressor," Julian said.

Being financially ready, which includes having good credit, can save a person at least $250,000 in interest over the course of a lifetime, Julian said.

While that kind of savings should be a good incentive, servicemembers have a greater motivator: mission readiness.

Financial readiness begets mission readiness, Julian said.

If a servicemember has bad credit or a bankruptcy or glaring signs of financial unpreparedness, they also jeopardize any security clearance they may have and, consequently, mission readiness.

Servicemembers aren't immune to economic trends, but unlike much of the general population, servicemembers have some resources and protections, Julian said.

"If you take a look at what we provide or what servicemembers and their families have access to, it really can help them avoid some of those pitfalls that are out there," he added. "We have counselors in our family readiness center ... we have command financial specialists embedded in the units.

"We've got online resources like Military OneSource ... if they don't feel comfortable walking into the family center or they don't live near a base," he said.

Other resources include Military Saves, Military Homefront's "Personal Financial Readiness" section. The department also works with other financial readiness partners like In Charge Institute, FINRA Investor Education Program, the Better Business Bureau Military Line and the Federal Trade Commission, among others.

Through these resources, servicemembers can learn how to start down the road to financial success and what tools are available to help them along the way.

The Thrift Savings Plan is one of those tools. It's the government's 401k-style plan, which allows pre-tax contributions up $16,500 and a combat zone tax exclusion up to $49,000, including bonuses and combat pay this year.

Any tax-exempt contributions made to Thrift Savings Plan accounts are not taxable, even after withdrawal, Julian said.

The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, signed into law June 22, beefed up TSP, adding a Roth 401k contribution option, auto enrollment for civilian employees, survivor benefits for TSP accounts and a mutual fund investment option.

Another savings option for servicemembers is the Savings Deposit Program. It's available to those serving in a designated combat zone. The account guarantees an automatic 10 percent return up to 10,000, but the interest is taxable.

Servicemembers also are able to take advantage of some protections against a bad economy, Julian said.

These include the Nelson-Talent Amendment, part of the Defense Reauthorization Bill of 2007, which caps interest rates for all loans to servicemembers and their dependents at 36 percent. It was an attempt to curb the practice of payday lenders targeting military personnel.

A 2008 report to Congress said the amendment was having the desired effect, Julian said.

Military Sentinel is another way servicemembers can protect their financial security. It's a partnership between the Defense Department and the Federal Trade Commission where servicemembers can report scams and register complaints.

The site is accessible to more than 500 law enforcement agencies and judge advocate generals, Julian said.

Like civilians, servicemembers also can "freeze" their credit by calling one of the three consumer credit agencies. It's good for at least a year unless the decision is reversed, and unlike civilians, it doesn't cost military members anything.

"[This] means that no one else while you're ... on active duty ... can open up or take out any lines of credit in your name without your permission or the person you designated to be your agent," Julian said. "Your identity cannot be stolen if this [is in effect].

"Ten million people a year get their identities stolen, and a lot of people are preying on military now," he added.

Servicemembers also may be protected from eviction while on active duty under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, which was expanded in 2003. It also provides a servicemember who receives permanent change of station orders or who is deployed to a new location for 90 days or more the right to terminate a housing lease.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 expanded the Homeowners Assistance Program to include wounded warriors and surviving spouses. It also could help some affected by Base Realignment and Closure 05, and those facing a permanent change of station that have been affected by the mortgage crisis.

With all the resources and opportunities available to them, the bottom line is any servicemember can achieve or maintain a state of financial readiness, Julian said.

"Our families are very proud," he said. "They like to pick themselves up by their bootstraps, but hopefully I got them at least aware that, 'Hey, there are resources out there. I can reach out.'"