Military News

Thursday, March 20, 2008

Retiring Commander Says Progress Occurring in Unstable CENTCOM Region

By John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service

March 20, 2008 - The "economic lifeblood of the developed world" flows through U.S. Central Command, a region beset by "vast instability," the CENTCOM commander said here last night.
Navy Adm. William J. "Fox" Fallon said the command's efforts, which include operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, aim to provide stability and security, restore hope in the region and allow future generations the chance to live peaceably.

"There are a lot of challenges, but we're succeeding, and we're going to succeed because we have (the) best people in the world working with us," he said. "And we have the great power and spirit of the American people, and many others in this world are behind us."

In one of his last public appearances in
military uniform, Fallon spoke at the Navy League's Sea, Air, Space Expo on the fifth anniversary of U.S. operations in Iraq.

The commander's remarks came a week after he submitted his resignation amid news reports suggesting he had fundamental disagreements with the White House on key elements of U.S. foreign policy in the Central Command region.

"Although I don't believe there have ever been any differences about the objectives of our policy in the Central Command area of responsibility, the simple perception that there is makes it difficult for me to effectively serve America's interests there," Fallon said in a statement released by Central Command March 11.

Revisiting the issue last night -- which he dubbed "the elephant in the room" -- Fallon dismissed as "pure bunk" the speculation over a reported disconnect between his own views and those of the Bush administration.

"The sad part is that this kind of inside-the-beltway drama is really obscuring what's really important to me, and that is the effort of our men and women in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Horn of Africa and these other troubled places in the Middle East and Southwest Asia," he told the 1,250-member audience.

The commander's civilian boss, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, accepted Fallon's resignation "with reluctance and regret."

"I believe it was the right thing to do, even though I do not believe there are, in fact, significant differences between his views and administration policy," Gates told reporters March 11 during a Pentagon news conference.

Fallon's deputy,
Army Lt. Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, will take over as acting commander of Central Command on March 31 until a permanent replacement is nominated and confirmed.

Some of the misperceptions about Fallon's relationship with the Bush administration involved perceived differences over U.S. policies regarding Iran. The admiral briefly discussed the majority-Shiite country last night, saying that Iran poses a challenge to the United States and exhibits behavior that is "not good."

"They are a real problem, killing and maiming our troops in Iraq; they're meddling in Afghanistan," he said. "They don't really present a very nice face to their neighbors."

On regional
security issues, Fallon described Iraq as his main focus over the past year and expressed guarded optimism over dramatic improvements to the country's security.

"It seems as I look back on the year that's gone by very quickly, and recognize the changes that have occurred, it's remarkable, to say the least," he added, while acknowledging that "tough pieces of turf" still exist in northern Iraq.

The commander portrayed some Iraqi provinces as transforming so rapidly that those who haven't been there for months, or even weeks, are "behind the times." He attributed the stability in part to coalition forces' increased cooperation with Iraqis at the local level, adjustments in detainee rehabilitation, improved services and economic progress.

"It hasn't happened with some magic wand," he said. "It's because of the hard work by our people in setting the conditions that enable the Iraqi army and the Iraqi
police to step up, and (allow) people to begin to go about living the kind of lives they want."

Unlike resource-rich Iraq, Fallon said, progress in Afghanistan is hampered by problems stemming from the country's isolation and poverty. "Most (Afghans) are illiterate," he said. "Jobs are pretty scarce, and there's a pretty long history (there) of butting heads with everybody."

Fallon expressed optimism that the country is "turning around" under the direction of strong
leadership, and with assistance from the military-civilian hybrid groups known as provincial reconstruction teams, which are helping to revitalize the country's basic services and infrastructure.

"The things they need in Afghanistan are roads, electric power, water management, a little bit of agricultural development, and they'll be rolling like big wheels," he said.

Fallon said efforts in the Horn of Africa, Central Asia and across Central Command are succeeding due to support from American citizens and U.S. allies.

"It seems to me that we in this country have a responsibility, because we are blessed above all others, to share what we have and to do what we can to make things better and to give people opportunities," he said. "That's what our people do for us every day."

America Supports You: Operation Homefront Village Welcomes First Families

By Samantha L. Quigley
American Forces Press Service

March 20, 2008 - Wounded warriors in need in
San Antonio now have a place to call home as they transition from military to civilian life. The new facility is Operation Homefront's first of four planned transitional housing facilities across the United States.

Jody Brothers from the PGA Tour and representatives from local Wal-Mart and Sam's Club stores were on hand to cut the ribbons on the apartments the Wal-Mart Foundation sponsored.

"Thanks to these and other sponsors, wounded warriors and their families can live at Operation Homefront Village rent-free so they can rebuild their financial foundation as they rebuild their health," said Amy Palmer, Operation Homefront's vice president of operations.

Medal of Honor recipients Jack Jacobs and Mike Thornton, for whom the two buildings are named, also participated in the ribbon-cutting ceremony.

All of the 20 two- and three-bedroom units in the complex are spoken for, and a waiting list has been established.

Designed for wounded warriors recuperating at nearby
military medical facilities and their families, the units are fully furnished, including computer and Internet access courtesy of CDW-G, which offers technology products and services, and Lockheed Martin, a defense contractor.

The facility also includes a central recreation and community center housing a food pantry, baby furniture, extra beds and a video library. Additionally, the center hosts various Operation Homefront programs. Some of those programs include Wounded Warrior Wives support group, presentations and meetings with career counselors,
college education specialists, and other experts whom Operation Homefront has partnered with to help recovering servicemembers move on with their lives.

Most active duty wounded warriors receiving treatment at Brooke
Army Medical Center are housed in the barracks, base housing or the Fisher House. However, in its daily collaboration with the U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Program and other Army case workers, Operation Homefront quickly realized that there is almost no temporary housing in America for wounded warriors who have retired or separated from the military.

"Many of these families have nowhere to live and no money until they receive their disability benefits from (Veterans Affairs)," Palmer said. "Thanks to some unique programs being tested jointly by the
Army and the VA, we believe we are seeing the waiting period for VA benefits decrease. In the meantime, however, many wounded warriors need a place to live right now. Operation Homefront is here to help."

Planned Operation Homefront Villages will accommodate needs at Walter Reed Medical Center here and the National Naval Medical Center in nearby Bethesda, Md., Balboa Naval Medical Center in San Diego, and Madigan
Army Medical Center in Tacoma, Wash.

Operation Homefront is a supporter of America Supports You, a Defense Department program connecting citizens and companies with servicemembers and their families serving at home and abroad.

(From an Operation Homefront news release.)

Combat Pay Counts Toward Economic Stimulus Payment Eligibility

By Jamie Findlater
Special to American Forces Press Service

March 20, 2008 -
Military personnel serving in combat zones are eligible for an economic stimulus payment, an Internal Revenue Service spokesman said today during an "America Supports You Live" interview on BlogTalkRadio. While combat pay generally is nontaxable, servicemembers are permitted to count this pay on their 2007 or 2008 income tax returns if it helps their eligibility, Clay Sanford explained.

"A
military person who would not normally file a 2007 tax return because the 2007 income is not taxable, can file a 1040A with the IRS and receive the stimulus payment," he said. Servicemembers should report their nontaxable combat pay on Line 40b of the Form 1040A to show at least $3,000 in qualifying income, he added.

Starting in May, as part of the economic stimulus plan, the IRS will issue payments of up to $600 -- $1,200 for married couples -- plus a $300 payment for each qualifying child younger than 17. The payments are based on 2007 income tax returns. The payments for individuals begin to phase out starting at $75,000 in adjusted gross income for single taxpayers, and at $150,000 for married couples.

People must have at least $3,000 in qualifying income to get a payment. Qualifying income is defined as any combination of earned income (such as wages or taxable income from self-employment), nontaxable combat pay and certain benefits from Social
Security, Veterans Affairs and Railroad Retirement.

Sanford encouraged qualifying servicemembers to submit early. While
military servicemembers who are serving in a combat zone are granted an extension of 180 days after leaving combat, spouses or others with a power of attorneys can prepare and file a 2007 income tax return on their behalf so that the stimulus payment is received this year. The return must be filed by Oct. 15.

Sanford offered additional tax advice to servicemembers during the interview, especially those who are just starting out and filing taxes for the first time.

"Keep receipts and copies of your tax returns," he cautioned. It's a good idea to keep receipts for six years and the tax returns indefinitely, he advised.

"You are responsible for your own tax return, regardless of whether you do it yourself or rely on a tax preparer," he said.

For help, Sanford listed a number of helpful documents that can provide clarification. By going to the IRS Web site at www.irs.gov and typing in "Publication 3," he explained, servicemembers will find a great resource for active duty people and reservists. He also recommended Publication 17 for learning more about general filing of individual income tax, and Publication 525, aimed at veterans and those with pensions. He also noted that many
military members qualify for free electronic tax filing.

"Additionally, on most
military installations, the legal office is there to provide you with information," he said, and he also noted that the military is one of the IRS's leading partners in its Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, in which provides on-site help to taxpayers, courtesy of volunteers in their organizations.

In today's digital age, irs.gov is a great resource for young servicemembers, Sanford went on to say. Sanford encouraged servicemembers to visit the site for detailed educational guides on filing, helpful tips and tools, and to learn more about the special deductions that may not be intuitive for
military members.

Those without easy access to the
Internet can call 1-800-TAX-1040 toll free for information and answers to any specific questions, he said.

(Jamie Findlater works in the New Media branch at American Forces Information Service.)

MILITARY CONTRACTS March 20, 2008


NAVY

General Dynamics, Electric Boat Corp., Groton, Conn., is being awarded a not-to-exceed $324,937,789 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-03-C-2101) for long lead time material associated with the FY 09 Va., Class Submarine (SSN 784) and the FY 11 Va., Class Submarine (SSN 787). This contract provides long lead time material for steam and electric plant components; the main propulsion unit and ship service turbine generator set; components that are critical to maintaining the submarine component industrial base; and miscellaneous Hull, Mechanical and Electrical system components to support ship construction of SSN 784 and SSN 787. Work will be performed in Groton, Conn.,/Quonset Point, R.I., (7 percent); Newport News, Va., (7 percent); Sunnyvale and South El Monte, Calif., (50 percent); Coatesville, York and Cheswick, Penn. (5 percent); Linden, Philipsburg, and
Florence, N.J. (5 percent); and at various sites throughout the United States (26 percent), and is expected to be completed by Mar. 2013. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington Navy Yard, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Integrated Systems, Melbourne, Fla., is being awarded a $13,500,258 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-02-C-6324) for a cost growth and new requirements related to development of the Rapid Airborne Mine Clearance System (RAMICS). RAMICS is a non-towed airborne mine neutralization system that is deployed from the MH-60S helicopter and provides a rapid response clearance capability against floating and near-surface moored sea mines that have been detected, classified and localized by the Airborne Laser Mine Detection System (ALMDS) or other mine hunting systems. Work will be performed in Melbourne, Fla., and work is expected to be completed by Sep. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division, Panama City, Fla., is the contracting activity.

The Engineering Partners, Inc.*, San Diego, Calif., is being awarded a maximum $7,500,000 (base and options - with a guaranteed minimum of $5000) firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity architect/engineering contract for electrical engineering services in the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwest area of responsibility (AOR). The work to be performed includes electrical engineering studies and reports; site
investigations reports; preparation of Requests for Proposals for design-build projects; preparation of fully designed plans and specifications for Invitation for Bid projects; cost estimates, evaluations and construction support services. Work will be performed at various Navy and Marine Corps installations within the NAVFAC Southwest AOR including, but not limited to Calif., (87 percent); Ariz., (5 percent), Nev., (5 percent), Colo., (1 percent), N.M. (1 percent) and Utah (1 percent), and work is expected to be competed Mar. 2009 (Mar. 2013 with options exercised). Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured as an eight (a) set-aside, with eight offers solicited via the NAVFAC e-solicitation website,with nine proposals received. Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest is the contracting activity (N62473-08-D-8622).

RBF Consulting, San Diego, Calif., is being awarded a maximum $7,500,000 (base year and options - with a guaranteed minimum of $5,000) firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite quantity architect/engineering contract for Civil Engineering Services in the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southwest area of responsibility (AOR). The work to be performed includes engineering studies and site investigations to support new development on raw land, or re-development of existing developed sites; preparation of Requests for Proposals for design-build projects; preparation of fully designed plans and specifications for Invitation for Bid projects; other civil engineering studies, reports, cost estimates, and evaluations; and construction support services including surveying, geotechnical, and environmental engineering services. Work will be performed at various
Navy and Marine Corps installations within the NAVFAC Southwest AOR including, but not limited to Calif., (87 percent); Ariz., (5 percent), Nev., (5 percent), Colo. (1 percent), N.M. (1 percent) and Utah (1 percent). The term of this contract is not to exceed 60 months, with an expected completion date of Mar. 2009 (Mar. 2013 with options exercised). Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured with 22 proposals solicited via the NAVFAC e-solicitation website,with 14 offers received. Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest is the contracting activity. The Contract number is N62473-08-D-8601.

AIR FORCE

Harris Corp., of
Rochester, N.Y., is being awarded a contract for $10,204,063. This action will provide the deployment of the total system of interim single channel handheld (SCHH) radios that are an integral part of the Air Force Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS) acquisition requires the acquisition of ancillary items. At this time $10,204,063 has been obligated. Hanscom AFB, Mass., is the contracting activity (GS35-F-0163N; FA8726-08-F-0002).

DEFENSE COMMISSARY AGENCY

Tyson Fresh Meats, Incorporated, 800 Stevens Port Drive,
Dakota Dunes, SD 57049, is being awarded an indefinite delivery, requirements type contract on Mar. 20, 2008, to provide as needed, case ready, primal and sub-primal pork products for resale to the commissary stores located in the DeCA East and West Regions, including AK., and Hawaii. The estimated award amount is $308,640,542.70. The contract is for a two year base period with performance starting May 4, 2008 through May 3, 2010. Three one-year option periods are available. If all option periods are exercised, the contract will be completed May 3, 2013. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Sixty-five firms were solicited and five offers were received. The contracting activity is the Defense Commissary Agency, Resale Contracting Division, Produce Support Branch, 1300 E Avenue, Fort Lee, Va. 23801-1800. (HDEC02-08-D-0005)

Lakeside Foods Inc. 7 East 13th Street Ste 322 Anniston, AL 36201-1083 is being awarded an indefinite delivery, requirements type contract on Mar. 19, 2008, to provide fresh shell protected eggs for resale at multiple delivery locations throughout DeCA's East Region commissaries to include the following states: S.C., Ga., and Fla. The estimated award amount is $9,347,826.12. Contractor will deliver fresh shell protected eggs to the store locations as needed. The contract is for a two year base period beginning Apr. 6, 2008, through Apr. 3, 2010. Three one-year option periods are available. If all three option periods are exercised, the contract will be completed Apr. 6, 2013. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Forty-five firms were solicited and six offers were received. The contracting activity is the Defense Commissary Agency, Resale Contracting Division, Resale Commodities Branch, 1300 E Avenue, Fort Lee, Va. 23801-1800. (HDEC02-08-D-0003)

Hillandale Farms East Inc. P.O. Box 217 Codorus, Pa., 17311-0217 is being awarded an indefinite delivery, requirements type contract on Mar. 19, 2008, to provide fresh shell protected eggs for resale at multiple delivery locations throughout DeCA's East Region commissaries to include the following states: Va., Maine, N.Y., Vt., N.H., Mass., Conn., N.J., Pa., and Md. The estimated award amount is $16,153,893.04. Contractor will deliver fresh shell protected eggs to the store locations as needed. The contract is for a two year base period beginning Apr. 6, 2008 through Apr. 3, 2010. Three one-year option periods are available. If all three option periods are exercised, the contract will be completed Apr. 6, 2013. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Forty-five firms were solicited and six offers were received. The contracting activity is the Defense Commissary Agency, Resale Contracting Division, Resale Commodities Branch, 1300 E Avenue, Fort Lee, Va. 23801-1800. (HDEC02-08-D-0002)

America Supports You: Navy Honors Montel Williams for Supporting Sailors, Marines

American Forces Press Service

March 20, 2008 - To recognize his continuous support and recognition of sailors,
Marines and their families throughout his 17 years on television, the Navy presented its Superior Public Service Award to Montel Williams yesterday in New York during the taping of his long-running program's final show. Navy Capt. Kenneth J. Braithwaite II, a rear admiral selectee and director of Joint Public Affairs Support Element Reserve, presented the award to Williams on behalf of Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead. The Superior Public Service Award is the second-highest award presented to civilians by the Department of the Navy.

"Thank you, thank you," said Williams after he was surprised with the award presentation once the show began rolling. "I've tried in the industry to recognize (
military servicemembers) and really bring to the forefront what is being sacrificed. I want to thank you, all of you, for what you do." Williams continued to wear the award throughout the finale show.

A video message from Roughhead, thanking Williams for his dedication and support to all sailors and
Marines, will air in a special segment during the final week of "The Montel Williams Show" before it goes off the air in May.

"It was an honor to be able to award a true patriot like Mr. Williams," Braithwaite said. "This award signifies his genuine gratitude for
military service. He has a definite understanding and appreciation of what sailors and Marines sacrifice, something he knows well from his own military experience."

Williams enlisted in the
Marine Corps in 1974, and in 1975 he was selected as the first black Marine to attend the Navy Prep School. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1980 and was commissioned as an intelligence officer, specializing in cryptology.

During annual holiday shows in his television program's long run, Williams has reunited deployed sailors with their families. In 2006, he and a production crew flew to the
Navy Central Command/5th Fleet area of responsibility to tour Iraqi oil platforms and meet with deployed sailors aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower.

His program frequently has featured guests from nonprofit organizations that support servicemembers to highlight their efforts. Throughout his 17 years on televisions, Williams continuously shared with audience members and viewers the importance of supporting the
military and recognized sailors' personal sacrifices in service to their country.

Williams' mother and relatives were in the audience for the series finale. To his staff, some of whom had been with the show since the first day, Williams declared that it would be a fun show celebrating their 17 years on television.

"It is very bittersweet today. Everybody has worked so hard," said Kwame White, production assistant. "He is a great man. Every day, while at work, I meet someone amazing here who has overcome something, and it has given me such an appreciation for what I have."

Navy Band Northeast, stationed in Newport, R.I., opened the show by playing the program's theme song.

"It was pretty intense and it was fun. There was a lot of energy in that studio," Petty Officer 3rd Class Marc Heskett, who was featured on the saxophone, said. "Our performances are not normally televised."

Lt. Carl Gerhard,
Navy Band Northeast director, said he was happy to be part of the event. "It feels great to be a part of this day," said. "This is a very special day for Mr. Williams, and it is nice to be here to play not only to celebrate his long run on television, but to play a tribute to his service as well."

The final episode of "The Montel Williams Show," featuring the Superior Public Service Award presentation, is scheduled to air May 16.

Defense Department Honors Female 'Firsts,' Role Models

By John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service

March 20, 2008 - The Defense Department honored
Army Col. Valerie Ratliff last night for her efforts to break down barriers for future generations of women. But Ratliff hopes the recognition, conferred on her and dozens of others here during the department's 2008 Women's History Month Outreach and Observance Reception, will soon be made obsolete by virtue of future women's continued success.

"This is just the beginning of the trailblazer recognition," she told American Forces Press Service today. "And it will be a good thing when we won't have to recognize it in the same manner.

"The history books will be written, the 'firsts' will be done," she continued. "The doors have been opened."

The Defense Department honored Ratliff and 12 other women with "Female Trailblazers" awards. In addition, 14 women received the Science,
Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Role Model Award for excellence in those fields.

Ratliff, an Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom veteran, is the first African-American woman in
Army history -- and the second woman in the branch's history -- to command a battalion of the elite 82nd Airborne Division.

In July 2002, she led her troops to Afghanistan, and because of her outstanding
leadership, was asked to lead a second element of her command to Iraq. As a result, five years ago from yesterday -- which marked the fifth anniversary of Operation Iraqi Freedom -- Ratliff found herself leading U.S. force toward Baghdad.

In addition to attaining the rank of
Army colonel and earning credentials as a "jumpmaster," Ratliff said the award recognizing her work in paving the way for women in the military ranks high on the list of accomplishments and honors she's accrued during her career.

Ratliff, who also served as the evening's master of ceremonies, said the award was especially significant because it put her in the company of other great women.

"I had already read the great accomplishments by the other award recipients, so just to be in the midst of the company of fighter pilots and first women to command ships was a major accomplishment," said Ratliff, who currently works in the Defense Department's Personnel and Readiness office.

The colonel dismisses the idea that women's career arcs are limited by barriers specific to their gender, a prejudice sometimes referred to as the "glass ceiling."

"I believe that that glass ceiling is no longer there. I don't think it was (extra) difficult (for me)," she said. "I believe that the
military in many regards has been started with men, and then women were incorporated into it, but with the leaders that we have now across the board, I believe that there is no glass ceiling and that women can go as far as they want to."

Ratliff said the reward was special because it cemented her path with those of other women who are currently breaking down gender barriers.

"What makes it unique is that I was recognized along with several other women who (followed) similar paths as I have," she said. "To be recognized for it and in the setting that it was for is what brought me the greatest honor."

The event, which comprised an audience spanning everyone from high-ranking officers to junior noncommissioned officers, allowed women to share in each other's success, Ratliff said.

"As each person's small accomplishment was recognized, we each had a sense that we were part of it," she said. "We were a part of what was being said about them; we were a part of the overall success and feeling that you got by breaking that barrier, so we all had that commonality amongst us all."

The other Female Trailblazer award recipients were
Army Lt. Col. Vivian T. Hudson; Navy Command Master Chief Petty Officer Jacqueline L. K. DiRosa; Navy Command Master Chief Petty Officer Beth L. Lambert; Marine Cpl. Sandy Vital; Marine Sgt. Cortnie B. Jozsa; Marine 1st Lt. Stephanie P. Drake; Air Force Brig. Gen. Lori J. Robinson; Air Force Capt. Allison K. Black; and Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Cheryl L. Gordon.

Other trailblazer recipients were Air National Guard Command Chief Master Sgt. Denise Jelinski-Hall; Air National Guard Chief Master Sgt. Anne T. Rice; and Air National Guard Chief Master Sgt. Wanda P. Wawruck.

Recipients of the Science,
Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Role Model Award include Fourth Estate STEM Winner Pamela J. McCue; Fourth Estate STEM Winner Dr. Beth H. Driver; Coast Guard Civilian STEM Winner Angela Owens Waller; Army Military STEM Winner Lt. Col. Lynn Byers; Army Civilian STEM Winner Kimberly Brooks-Hall; Coast Guard Military STEM Winner Lt. Cmdr. Gabrielle McGrath; and National Guard Bureau Civilian STEM Winner Barbara Koscak.

Other recipients were
Navy Military Winner Lt. j.g. Onege Bateagborsangaya; Navy Civilian Winner Maria V. Thorpe; National Guard Bureau Military STEM Winner Maj. Teresa Morrell-Riech; Air Force Civilian Winner Dr. Gail J. Brown; Marine Corps Military STEM Winner Chief Warrant Officer 3 Melissa A. Tafoya; Marine Corps Civilian STEM Winner Robin Thomas; and Air Force Military STEM Winner Lt. Col. Lynnane E. George.

Military Awards

The purpose of this message is to announce the 2007 Military Photographer of the Year (MILPHOG), Military Graphic Artist of the Year (MILGRAPH) and Military Videographer of the Year (MILVID) award winners.

The competitions are open to enlisted active duty, reserve, and national guard personnel of all the armed services, including the U.S.
Coast Guard, holding the occupational specialty code(MOS, NEC, OR AFSC) of photographer, journalist, photojournalist, videographer, broadcaster, graphic artist, mass communication specialist or equivalent. All materials were produced between 1 Jan 07 AND 31 Dec 07. Winning entries may be viewed on The Defense Information School (DINFOS) website at WWW.DINFOS.OSD.MIL. A combined award ceremony will be held at the DINFOS, to honor the achievements of the award winners, on 16 May 2008, 1000. All winners, their commanding officers and their guests are invited to attend.

The following have been announced as winners of the
Military Photographer of the Year (MILPHOG) Competition.

Military Photographer of the Year - USAF SSgt Stacy L. Pearsall, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. 1st Runner-up - USAF TSgt Jeremy T. Lock, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. Honorable Mention (HM) - USAF TSgt Adrian Cadiz, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USAF MSgt Andrew N. Dunaway, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C.. HM - USAF SSgt Shawn P. Weismiller, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USAF TSgt Cecilio M. Ricardo, Air Force News Agency, San Antonio, TX.

COMBAT DOCUMENTATION: 1st Place - USAF SSgt Stacy L. Pearsall, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. 2nd Place - USN MC2 Kevin S. O'Brien. Department of the
Navy/Office of the Secretary, Pentagon. 3rd Place - USN MC2 Kittipongse Amaritnant, NECC Det. Combat Camera, Norfolk, VA. HM - USAF TSgt Jeremy T. Lock, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USN MC1 Brien R. Aho, Naval Media Center, Anacostia Naval Station, D.C. HM - USA SSG Adam R. Mancini, HHC JMRC OPS GROUP VIPERS. HM - USAF SrA Nicholas J. Pilch, 437th Airlift Wing, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USAF A1C Evelyn Chavez, 27th Special Operations Wing, Canon AFB, NM. HM - USN MC2 Todd C. Frantom, NECC DET Combat Camera, Norfolk, VA. HM - USAF TSgt Adrian Cadiz, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C.

PICTURE STORY: 1st Place - USAF SSgt Stacy L. Pearsall, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. 2nd Place - AF TSgt Jeremy T. Lock, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. 3rd Place - USAF TSgt Cecilio M. Ricardo,
Air Force News Agency, San Antonio, TX. HM - USN MC1 Michael L. Larson, Fleet Combat Camera Group Pacific, San Diego, CA. HM - USN MC1 Brien R. Aho, Naval Media Center, Anacostia Naval Station, D.C. HM- USN PH3 Kristopher S. Wilson, USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75).

NEWS: 1st Place - USAF SSGT Shawn P. Weismiller, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. 2nd Place - USN MC2 John Stratton, Fleet Public Affairs Center, Atlantic, Norfolk, VA. 3rd Place - USAF SrA Christopher L. Ingersoll, 1 FW/PA, Langley AFB, VA. HM - USAF TSgt Cecilio M. Ricardo,
Air Force News Agency, San Antonio, TX. HM - USAF SSgt Bennie J. Davis, Air Force News Agency, San Antonio, TX. HM - USAF SSgt Shawn P. Weismiller, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USN MCSA Matthew Bookwalter, Fleet Public Affairs Center, Atlantic, Norfolk, VA. HM - USAF TSgt Sean M. Worrell, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C.

FEATURE: 1st Place - USAF SSgt Stacy L. Pearsall, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. 2nd Place - USAF TSgt Jeremy T. Lock, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. 3rd Place - USN MC2 Todd C. Frantom, NECC DET Combat Camera, Norfolk, VA. HM - USAF SSgt Stacy L. Pearsall, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USN PH2 Johansen Laurel, Fleet Combat Camera Group Pacific, NAS North Island, CA. HM - USAF MSgt Andrew N. Dunaway, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USN MC1 Brien R. Aho, Naval Media Center, Anacostia Naval Station, D.C. HM - USAF SSgt Joshua L. DeMotts, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USAFR MSgt Richard Sforza, 4th Combat Camera Squadron, March ARB, CA. HM - USMC Sgt Clinton F. Firstbrook, E Co., 4th LAR, Syracuse, NY. HM - USAF SSgt Brian P. Ferguson,
Air Force News Agency, San Antonio, TX. HM - USAF TSgt Adrian Cadiz, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C.

PORTRAIT PERSONALITY: 1st Place - USAF SSgt Stacy L. Pearsall, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. 2nd Place - USAF TSgt Jeromy K. Cross, 460 SW/PAZ, Buckley AFB, CO. 3rd Place - USAF SSgt Joshua L. DeMotts, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USAF MSgt Andrew N. Dunaway, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USAF SSgt Joann S. Makinano, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USAF TSgt Jeremy T. Lock, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USAF SSgt Joshua L. DeMotts, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USAF TSgt Adrian Cadiz, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USAF TSgt Jeremy T. Lock, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C.

ILLUSTRATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY: 1st Place - USAF TSgt Matthew J. Hannen, AETC/SEM Torch Magazine, Cibolo, TX. 2nd Place - USMC Sgt Clinton F. Firstbrook, E Co., 4th LAR, Syracuse, NY. 3RD PLACE - USAF TSgt Cecilio M. Ricardo,
Air Force News Agency, San Antonio, TX. HM - USAF SSgt Jake N. Bailey, MPJ/Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY. HM - USAF SrA Clay Lancaster, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USN MCSN Daniel A. Barker, Fleet Public Affairs Center, Pacific, San Diego, CA. HM - USA SPC Kieran A. Cuddihy, 55th Combat Camera, Ft. Meade, MD. HM - USN MC2 James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln CVN 72.

PICTORIAL: 1st Place - USAF SSgt Stacy L. Pearsall, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. 2nd Place - USA SSG Jon Soucy, 58th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Reisterstown, MD. 3rd Place - USAF MSgt Andrew N. Dunaway, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USAF SSgt Stacy L. Pearsall, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USN MCSN Matthew Williams, USS Harry Truman (CVN 75). HM - USN MC1 Brien R. Aho, Naval Media Center, Anacostia Naval Station, D.C. HM - USCG PA2 Robert L. Nash,
Coast Guard Public Affairs District Seven, Atlantic Beach, FL. HM - USMC Sgt Ethan E. Rocke, III Marine Expeditionary Force/Marine Corps Bases Japan Consolidated Public Affairs Office, Camp Foster, Japan.

SPORTS: 1st Place - USA PFC Kirby Rider, 115 MPAD, Baqouba, Iraq. 2nd Place - USN MC1 Tiffini M. Jones, OPNAV, Chief of Naval Operations, Pentagon, DC. 3rd Place - USAF SrA Clay Lancaster, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USAF TSgt Jeremy T. Lock, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USMC Cpl Randall A. Clinton, 24th
Marine Expeditionary Unit, Camp Lejeune, N.C. HM - USAF SSgt Manuel J. Martinez, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USAF TSgt Jeremy T. Lock, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USAF TSgt Cecilio M. Ricardo, Air Force News Agency, San Antonio, TX.

The following have been announced as winners of
Military Graphic Artist of the Year (MILGRAPH) Competition.

MILITARY GRAPHIC ARTIST OF THE YEAR, USAF MSgt William Vance, Wing Education & Training Division, Lackland AFB, TX. 1st Runner-Up, USN MCC Pierre Georges, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Pentagon, D.C.

ILLUSTRATION: 1st Place - USMC Cpl Christopher Peace, III
Marine Expeditionary Force/Marine Corps Bases Japan, Consolidated Public Affairs Office, Camp Foster, Japan. 2nd Place - USN MCC Pierre Georges, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Pentagon, D.C. 3rd Place - USA SSG Peter Donigan, OAA, AMVID, Pentagon, D.C. HM - USAF MSgt William Vance, Wing Education & Training Division, Lackland AFB, TX. HM - USAF MSgt William Vance, Wing Education & Training Division, Lackland AFB, TX.

FINE ART: 1st Place - USAF MSgt William Vance, Wing Education & Training Division, Lackland AFB, TX. 2nd Place - USN MC1 Russell Stewart, Defense Information School, Ft. Meade, MD. 3rd Place - USN MC1 Russell Stewart, Defense Information School, Ft. Meade, MD. HM - USN MCC Pierre Georges, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Pentagon, D.C. HM - USAF SSgt Monique Jose, Defense Information School, Ft. Meade, MD.

DIGITAL ART: 1st Place - USAF TSgt Erik Simmons, 142CF/PA Oregon Air National Guard,
Portland, OR. 2nd Place - USAF MSgt William Vance, Wing Education & Training Division, Lackland AFB, TX. 3rd Place - USA SSG Deidre Piechocki, Recruiting and Retention Command, Lansing, MI. HM - USAF TSgt Erik Simmons, 142CF/PA Oregon Air National Guard, Portland, OR. HM - USAF TSgt Erik Simmons, 142CF/PA Oregon Air National Guard, Portland, OR. HM - USAF TSgt Erik Simmons, 142CF/PA Oregon Air National Guard, Portland, OR. HM - USA SGT Brandon Spragins, HHC, 5th Signal Command, Mannheim, Germany. HM - USAF MSgt William Vance, Wing Education & Training Division, Lackland AFB, TX.

WEB DESIGN: HM - USAF SSgt Zachary Bolda, United States
Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron, Nellis AFB, NV.

ANIMATION: 1st Place - USAF MSgt George Jumara, 435 CS/SCSVG, Ramstein, Germany. 2nd Place - USAF TSgt Rick Dunaway, HQ Air University/Air University Television, Maxwell AFB, AL. 3rd Place - USAF TSgt Rick Dunaway, HQ Air University/Air University Television, Maxwell AFB, AL. HM - USAF MSgt William Pope, 439th Airlift Wing Public Affairs, Chicopee, MA.

PUBLICATION: 1st Place - USAF TSgt Matthew Hannen, AETC/SEM Torch Magazine, Cibolo, TX. 2nd Place - USAF MSgt George Jumara, 435 CS/SCSVG, Ramstein, Germany. 3rd Place - USAF SSgt Jon DuMond, USAFADS, Nellis AFB, NV. HM - USA SPC Russel Schnaare, USASMA HQ & HQ Company, Ft Bliss, TX

MULTIMEDIA: HM - USA SSG Peter Donigan, OAA, AMVID, Pentagon, D.C.

LAYOUT & DESIGN: 1st Place - USN MC2 Steven Shepard, USS Blue Ridge, Yokosuka, JAPAN. 2nd Place - USN MCC Pierre Georges, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Pentagon, D.C. 3rd Place - USN MC1 Brien R. Aho, Naval Media Center, Anacostia Naval Station, D.C. HM - USN MC1 Brien R. Aho, Naval Media Center, Anacostia Naval Station, D.C. HM - USCG PA2 Lauren Downs, Boston, MA HM - USAF SSgt Aaron Perkins, 142 FW PA, Portland, OR. HM - USA SGT Brandon Spragins, HHC, 5th Signal Command, Mannheim, Germany.

The following have been announced as winners of the
Military Videographer of the Year (MILVID) Competition.

MILITARY VIDEOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR - USN MC2(AW/SW) Summer Anderson, FLTCOMCAMGRUPAC, NAS North Island, CA.

COMBAT DOCUMENTARY: 1st Place - USN MC2(AW/SW) Summer Anderson, FLTCOMCAMGRUPAC, NAS North Island, CA. 2nd Place - USAF TSgt Michael Davis,
Vermont National Guard Public Affairs, South Burlington, VT. 3rd Place - TSgt Michael Hasenauer, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USAF SrA Geneve Stone, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C.

EDITING: 1st Place - USAF SrA Jose Rodriguez Jr., 435 ABW PA, Ramstein, Germany. 2nd Place - USN MC1 Shane McCoy, Naval Media Center, Anacostia Naval Station, D.C. 3rd Place - USA SSG Raymond Flores, Soldiers Media Center/ Soldiers Radio and Television, Alexandria, VA. HM - USMC LCpl Victor Velazquez, H&S Battalion, Quantico, VA. HM - USMC GySgt Steven Williams, MarinesTV, Division of Pubic Affairs, Washington D.C. HM - USN MC2(AW) Andrew Geraci, Naval Media Center, Broadcast Detachment, Diego Garcia.

DOCUMENTARY: 1st Place - USAF MSgt James Monk, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. 2nd Place - USAF TSgt James Carney, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. 3rd Place - USAF MSgt James Monk, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C.

FEATURE STORY: 1st Place - USMC CPL Christian Winter, MarinesTV, Division of Pubic Affairs Washington, DC. 2nd Place - USMC GySgt Steven Williams, MarinesTV, Division of Pubic Affairs, Washington D.C. 3rd Place - USA SSG Raymond Flores, Soldiers Media Center/ Soldiers Radio and Television, Alexandria, VA. HM - USN MC2 Jason Zuidema, Fleet Public Affairs Center Pacific, NAS North Island, CA. HM - USN MC2(AW) Andrew Geraci, Naval Media Center, Broadcast Detachment, Diego Garcia.

FIELD PRODUCTION: 1st Place - USN MC2(AW/SW) Summer Anderson, FLTCOMCAMGRUPAC, NAS North Island, CA. 2nd Place - USAF TSgt Michael Davis,
Vermont National Guard Public Affairs, South Burlington, VT. 3rd Place - USAF TSgt Michael Davis, Vermont National Guard Public Affairs, South Burlington, VT. HM - USAF MSgt James Monk, 1st Combat Camera Squadron, Charleston AFB, S.C. HM - USMC Cpl Tanner Iskra, HQSVCBN, CVIC, Quantico, VA.

Please direct any questions to LT Glenn Sircy; Comm. Tel: 301-677-6428 / DSN: 622-6428 / Email:
glenn.sircy@dinfos.osd.mil

Face of Defense: Women's Aviation Hall of Fame Inducts Air Force Pilot


By Staff Sgt. Jeremy Larlee, USAF
Special to American Forces Press Service

March 19, 2008 - In the months since her last flight in the No. 3 jet for the
Air Force's Thunderbirds, Maj. Nicole Malachowski has had a hard time attaching perspective to being the first woman to fly on a service-level U.S. military flight demonstration team. But at the San Diego Air and Space Museum on March 14, the major said, she was blindsided by an emotional moment that placed her achievements into focus.

The visit to the museum was part of the 19th Annual International Women in Aviation Conference held here March 12 through 15. The conference, attended by more than 3,200 people, included an exhibit hall, speeches by aviation legends and professional development classes. It ended with Malachowski's induction into the Women in Aviation International's Pioneer Hall of Fame, along with Nancy Love, Geraldine Mock, Margaret Ringenberg and the women's section of the Air Transport Auxiliary.

Earlier in the year, Malachowski donated one of her show suits to the museum, which had turned it into a display in time for the conference. The major said she had what she called a "non-fighter-pilot moment" and had to excuse herself for a few minutes to get composed when she got her first glimpse of the display.

"I'm 33 years old and looking at something that I wore in so many air shows displayed in a museum," she said. "People were just looking at it and taking photos and standing there. I realized the significance of what I have done and how I could inspire others."

Malachowski said it was an honor to attend the conference and she enjoyed being in the ranks of historic female aviators.

"Women have been involved in aviation since the time of hot-air balloons," she said. "It's only normal to me that women are going to add their strength and skills to the effort of pushing aviation forward."

The major said one of the highlights for her in the conference was interacting with members of the Women Airforce Service Pilots, which was an organization essential in freeing up male pilots for combat service and duties in
World War II. The women would transport aircraft throughout the U.S. and Canada. They also assisted in training pilots. Thirty-eight women died while performing these duties.

"We have to honor the accomplishments and courage of the Women Airforce Service Pilots," Malachowski said. "People think it is great that these women were flying fighter aircraft 60 years ago. It is not remarkable because they were women. It is remarkable because they were there in defense of the free world and helped bring our country and allies to victory. I know I had the Thunderbirds experience and I'm standing here today in this wonderful uniform because of the contributions and sacrifices of people like them."

In her duties as an
Air Force security forces airman, Senior Airman Tara Currah has spent a lot of time guarding aircraft while stationed at McChord Air Force Base, Wash. She said she really enjoyed the professional development courses in the conference, and had a chance to speak with Malachowski.

"It has been inspiring to see so many powerful women," she said. "It makes you feel like you can accomplish anything if you put your mind to it."

The major said her mantra has always been that actions speak louder than words.

"I wanted to show through my actions that women are capable of anything," she said. "I did my best, and I hope I represented our
Air Force with the respect it deserves."

(
Air Force Staff Sgt. Jeremy Larlee serves at the Air Force News Agency.)

Army Seeks DNA Samples from Families of MIA Soldiers

By Kristen Noel
American Forces Press Service

March 19, 2008 - More than 6,300 families need to be located to collect
DNA samples for the purpose of identifying missing soldiers from World War II and the wars in Korea and Vietnam, a U.S. Army official said yesterday. The military maintains a database of mitochondrial DNA samples from family members of missing-in-action soldiers in the Armed Forces DNA Identification Lab, Army Lt. Col. Julius Smith, chief of past conflict repatriation for Army Casualty and Mortuary Affairs, said during a teleconference with online journalists and "bloggers."

Smith explained that the
DNA samples help the Army identify missing soldiers' remains when they are uncovered, so they can be returned to the families.

The Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command continually sends
anthropologists and forensic analysts to search past-conflict locations identified as potential recovery sites, provided the country where the conflict took place allows U.S. access.

Mitochondrial
DNA is used for identification because it can be extracted from skeletal remains, which are the only kind of remains coming back from conflicts that happened more than 50 years ago, Linda Baublitz, chief of the Korean War section of the Past Conflict Repatriation Branch, explained.

The mitochondrial
DNA source is passed only through the maternal line, Baublitz said, so the Army has to locate eligible donors from the mother's side of the missing soldiers' families.

The
DNA samples are collected through an oral swab kit that is mailed to the donor, she said.

Baublitz also said the
Army Past Conflict Repatriation Branch has launched an outreach program to try to locate more eligible donors from families of unaccounted-for soldiers from the Korean and Vietnam wars. Efforts to obtain family DNA samples for missing World War II soldiers are being handled on a case-by-case basis, Smith said.

The
Army has a record of missing soldiers' next of kin from personnel files, Smith said, but the lapsed time has made it difficult to track down current information on family members.

"It's hard to keep in touch with (the families) now, because most of them ... are now getting older," Carolyn Floyd, the Southeast Asia section chief for the Past Conflict Repatriation Branch, said. "You're getting out of the line of having parents or wives."

Though contracted professional and amateur volunteer genealogists, as well as volunteers from veterans' groups, have helped the Army track down thousands of missing soldiers' families, Smith said, public input is needed to identify families with missing soldiers and to keep family records updated.

Smith explained that the
Army provides lines of communication for the public to come forward with information. Families with unaccounted-for soldiers, or anyone who knows of a family with an unaccounted-for soldier, should contact the Past Conflict Repatriation Branch by calling 1-800-892-2490 or sending an e-mail to tapscper@conus.army.mil, he said.

"The information you provide can be the difference in an identification being made and a soldier coming home," Smith said.

(Kristen Noel works for the New Media branch of the American Forces Information Service.)

MILITARY CONTRACTS March 19, 2008


NAVY

Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co., Sunnyvale, Calif., is being awarded a $25,000,000 modification (PH0006) under previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract (N00030-07-C-0100) alternate release assembly design, modeling, and testing efforts. The modification increases the total contract value to $1,026,269,387. Work will be performed primarily in Sunnyvale, Calif., and places yet to be determined. Work is expected to be completed May 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year (FY2008). The contract was not competitively procured. Strategic Systems Programs, Arlington, Va., is the contracting activity.

ITT Communications & Countermeasures Systems, Thousand Oaks, Calif., is being awarded a $24,754,858 modification to previously awarded contract N00024-07-C-6311 to exercise an option for the production and support of 325 JCREW 2.1 Radio-Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare systems to meet urgent Department of Defense requirements in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Work will be performed in Thousand Oaks, Calif., (87 percent) and Lancaster, Calif., (13 percent), and is expected to be completed by Nov. 2008. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington
Navy Yard, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Protective Products International of
Sunrise, Fla., is being awarded a $12,726,353 delivery order (0002) under firm fixed price, indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity contract M67854-07-D-3065 for Modular Tactical Vest consumable spare and repair parts to sustain currently fielded MTVs. Work will be performed in Granite Falls, N.C., (70 percent) and in Sunrise, Fla., (30 percent). The effort is expected to be completed by Mar. 2009. Contract funds in the amount of $12,726,353 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was a sole source award. The Marine Corps Systems Command (M67854), Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity (M67854-07-D-3065).

Wyle Laboratories, Inc., Huntsville, Ala., is being awarded an $11,320,335 cost-plus-award-fee contract for the services and materials necessary to support the analysis, design, development, test, integration, deployment, and operations of information technology (IT) systems and services. Work will be performed in China Lake, Calif., (90 percent) and Pt. Mugu, Calif.,(10 percent)and is expected to be completed in Jul. 2008. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake, Calif., is the contracting activity (N68936-08-D-0018).

Windsor Continental Corp.*, Alexandria, Va., is being awarded a $11,149,992 firm-fixed-price supply contract to provide collective training and simulation systems to support
Army National Guard training requirements in the form of deployable instrumentation capability (Flex Train) and the Mobile Virtual Training Capability for unit training. These training and simulation capabilities shall provide a highly realistic battlespace experience for training units as they prepare for mobilization in accordance with the Force Generation Model. This contract includes an option which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $12,443,686. Work will be performed in Alexandria, Va., and work is expected to be complete by Mar. 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This is a competitive 100 precent small business set-aside procurement. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md., is the contracting activity (N00174-08-C-0022).

Lockheed Martin Services, Cherry Hill, N.J., is being awarded a $9,863,300 cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for
security cooperation, security assistance and foreign military sales technical and program/project management support services to Naval Inventory Control Point. This contract includes one base year and three one-year option periods, which if exercised, bring the total estimated value of the contract to $47,538,352. Work will be performed in Philadelphia, Pa., (70 percent) and Washington, D.C., (30 percent), and work is expected to be completed by Mar. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured. The Fleet Industrial Supply Center Norfolk, Contracting Department Philadelphia Division is the contracting activity (N00189-08-D-Z025).

Reliable Builders, Inc., P.O. Box 7536, Tamuning, Guam 96931, a Section 8(a), certified Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB), certified HUBZone firm is being awarded a $8,029,000.00 firm-fixed price contract for the FY08 MILCON SAKW335780B, upgrade northwest field infrastructure, phase II, Andersen
Air Force Base, Guam. Award is made for CLIN 0001 in the amount of $6,309,000.00; CLIN 0002 in the amount of $250,000.00; CLIN 0003 in the amount of $180,000.00; CLIN 0004 in the amount of $470,000.00; and CLIN 0005 in the amount of $820,000.00. Total contract award is $8,029,000.00. Work will be performed in Guam on Andersen Air Force Base and is expected to be completed 7 November 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was a set-aside for Historically Underutilized Business Zone Small Business Concerns with 28 solicitation packages distributed and three (3) proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Pacific, Construction Contracts Branch, is the contracting activity (contract number N62742-08-C-1309).

AIR FORCE

TW and Co., of Lanham, Md., is being awarded a firm fixed price contract for $8,857,852. This requirement contract is for certified armed
security guard services for Installation Entry Control, Commercial Vehicle Inspection and Visitor Control Center at 17 Air Force CONUS locations. At this time $8,857,852 has been obligated. Randolph AFB, Texas is the contracting activity (FA3002-07-D-0024 (via task order 000201)).

Southern Protective Services (SEP), Inc. of Rock Hill, S.C., is being awarded a firm fixed price contract for $6,416,084. This requirement contract is for certified armed
security guard services for Installation Entry Control, Commercial Vehicle Inspection and Visitor Control Center at 15 Air Force CONUS locations. At this time $6,416,084 has been obligated. Randolph AFB, Texas is the contracting activity (FA3002-07-D-0022 (via task order 000201)).