Military News

Friday, February 19, 2010

Former Marine F-18 Pilot Pleads Guilty to Conspiring to Defraud the Department of Veterans Affairs

Received Nearly $150,000 in Fraudulent Disability Benefits

February 19, 2010 - LOUISVILLE, KY—After two days of trial, Dean Anthony Toth, age 38, of Oldham County, Kentucky, pled guilty to conspiring to defraud the Department of Veterans Affairs by filing a fraudulent claim for military disability benefits, and for structuring bank transactions, United States Attorney Candace G. Hill of the Western District of Kentucky announced today.

Toth served on active duty in the Marine Corps from 1995 to 2004, and was an F-18 pilot who was named the 2003 Marine Instructor of the Year. Toth admitted that between July 2007 and November 2008, he conspired with Daniel Ryan Parker, a former employee of the Disabled American Veterans, to file a fraudulent claim for military disability benefits, claiming that he was deaf in both ears. Parker worked with Jeffrey McGill, a former Department of Veterans Affairs employee, to falsify Toth’s file.

Toth’s military medical records showed yearly audiometry exams, all of which reflected that Toth’s hearing was within normal limits. Toth is now a pilot with Southwest Airlines. In mandatory yearly physicals conducted by the Department of Transportation in March 2006, March 2007, and March 2008, Toth reported no hearing loss or problems, and passed a conversational voice test conducted at six feet. Nonetheless, Toth pursued a military disability claim for hearing loss, and Toth admitted that he knew that Parker would falsify his medical records to support his claim. In return Toth agreed to pay Parker two-thirds of any retroactive payment he received. On August 10, 2007, Toth took a hearing exam and the results indicated that his hearing was "within normal limits." Parker and McGill, however, altered Toth's exam results to reflect that Toth had profound hearing loss, and McGill personally reviewed Toth's claim.

As a result, Toth's claim was approved for 100 percent disability based on hearing loss with special monthly compensation for deafness in both ears. On October 31, 2007, the VA paid Toth $93,240 in retroactive disability payments, and Toth also began receiving over $2,500 per month in disability payments. These monthly payments were tax free and would have continued for life. Toth deposited the $93,240 in his bank account, and in November 2007, Toth withdrew $30,000 in cash from his bank, in three separate $10,000 withdrawals. Toth admitted that he structured these withdrawals to avoid bank reporting requirements for transactions over $10,000. Toth later gave Parker an additional $32,160 in the form of a cashier’s check. The total payment to Parker of $62,160 represented exactly two-thirds of the retroactive payment. Parker subsequently shared that kickback with McGill.

The maximum potential penalties for Toth are 10 years’ imprisonment, a $500,000 fine, and supervised release for up to three years.

The case was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney David Weiser, and it was investigated by the Department of Veterans Affairs Office of the Inspector General, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

The plea was entered before Jennifer B. Coffman, Judge, United States District Court, Louisville, Kentucky. Toth is scheduled to be sentenced before Judge Coffman on May 17, 2010, at 1:00 p.m., in Louisville, Kentucky. Parker and McGill pled guilty previously, along with all 11 other co-defendants, and are scheduled to be sentenced on April 19, 2010, at 2:00 p.m.

Iwo Jima Vets Observe Battle's 65th Anniversary


By Lisa Daniel
American Forces Press Service

Feb. 19, 2010 - Dozens of veterans of the Battle of Iwo Jima and their families gathered at the National Museum of the Marine Corps here today to commemorate the 65th anniversary of the iconic World War II battle. The battle for Iwo Jima the first U.S. attack on Japanese soil is memorialized worldwide by the famous Joe Rosenthal photo of five Marines and a Navy corpsman raising the U.S. flag on Mount Suribachi. Three of the six later were killed in battle.

"Iwo Jima was not the bloodiest or the longest battle" of World War II and "it probably was not even the most successful in the Pacific Island campaign," Gen. James T. Conway, commandant of the Marine Corps, told the audience. "All that said, Iwo Jima occupies a place in our history like no other battle."

Conway said he believes that's a result of the determination, courage and sacrifice of the men who fought there, noting the "savagery" of the battle. "It was kill or be killed," he said.

And that was true of both sides of the fighting, Conway said, noting a comment a Japanese lieutenant colonel made about the Americans during the battle: "They are relentless, and they fight with a mentality like they are exterminating insects."

George Alden of Fort Worth, Texas, was a 20-year-old sergeant with 1st Battalion, 27th Marine Regiment, 5th Marine Division, when he stormed the volcanic ash beach in the first wave of U.S. troops onto Iwo Jima. The Japanese -- who with 21,000 troops had nearly three times more men than Alden and his unit expected -- had terraced the beach, making for an arduous climb for the troops who had no alternative but to move forward on the eight-square-mile island.

About 400 yards up the beach, Alden and his unit came upon a bunker. After taking charge of the action that demolished the bunker, Alden was seriously wounded on his left side by rifle fire. "I laid out in the open until almost dark," he recalled.

Finally, a litter bearer approached the injured Alden. "They said they'd passed me four times thinking I was dead," he said. They could not evacuate him until the next morning, leaving Alden and three of his comrades in a fox hole overnight.

Three days later, on the fifth day of the battle, Alden was aboard a hospital ship when a medic told him to look out the port hole over his bed. "That was when I saw the flag rising up above the smoke and haze," he said, remembering the scene of Rosenthal's famous photo.

Like others, Alden said, the image of the U.S. flag on the mountaintop made him think the battle soon would be over. In fact, it would last 31 more days, claiming 6,820 Americans dead or missing, and 19,000 wounded.

"We could not have guessed that Feb. 19, 1945, would start 36 of the most deadly days in the history of the Marine Corps and probably the most savage fighting we have ever engaged in," Conway said.

For today's Marines, Iwo Jima is the "gold standard," the commandant said. "It drives us, it inspires us, and it gives us confidence" in training and preparedness, he said.

In the Iraq war, Conway said, a young Marine was asked about the possibility of U.S. troops wresting control of Fallujah from insurgents. "Of course we can take Fallujah," Conway said the Marine replied. "We took Iwo Jima."

Retired Marine Corps Gen. James L. Jones, now President Barack Obama's national security advisor, thanked the veterans for their service. "We honor your legacy for the lives you saved," he said.

Jones said today's Marines gain strength from the examples set by the veterans of Iwo Jima, and he asked the audience to keep today's Marines in mind, especially those confronting the Taliban in Afghanistan.

Ron "Rondo" Scharfe, an Iwo Jima veteran from Missoula, Mont., was 16 when he hit the Japanese island's shores. "Our knees were shaking so bad we could barely stand up," he said. "We didn't know where the hell we were going. We were tight as rubber bands."

Scharfe said he and his comrades crawled onto the beach, which already was smoking and "smelling like a junkyard" on the first day of battle. The Japanese "waited 'til we got on the beach, then they opened up on us," he said.

Scharfe survived nine days of Iwo Jima without serious injuries, before being sent to Okinawa. Today, he said, he thinks about the Marines in Afghanistan and thinks Iwo Jima was easier in at least one way. "At least we knew who the enemy was," he said.

Retired Marine Corps Col. Harvey Barnum, a Medal of Honor recipient for heroism in Vietnam, said the courage of those on Iwo Jima was proven by the number of Medal of Honor recipients the battle yielded: 22 Marines and five sailors.

The commemoration of the battle is important for the veterans who remain, Barnum said.

"They've gotten older, but nothing has changed in their heart," he said. "These people are all in their 80s, and they've come from all over the country to be here. But this will be the last time for many of them."

MILITARY CONTRACTS February 19, 2010

U.S. SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND

iGov Technologies of McLean, Va., is the current contractor for the USSOCOM Tactical Local Area Network contract providing TACLAN family of system acquisition, design, integration, production, and delivery in support of Special Operations Forces' mission requirements. This sole source effort is to increase the TACLAN contract maximum from $300,000,000 to $450,000,000. The original contract was awarded through a competitive action. The contract number for the increase is 92222-08-D-0017, Modification.

ARMY

GM GDLS Defense Group LLC., Sterling Heights, Mich., was awarded on Feb. 8, 2010 a $176,185,164 firm-fixed-price contract for 103 each of Stryker vehicles. Work is to be performed in Sterling Heights, Mich., (60 percent), and London, Ontario, and Canada, (40 pecent) with an estimated completion date of June 30, 2012. One bid was solicted with one bid recived. Tank Automotive & Armament Command, SFAE-GCS-BCT-P, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-07-D-M112).

Lockheed Martin Missiles and fire control, Orlando, Fla., was awarded on Feb. 5, 2010 a $76,578,606 firm-fixed-price and time and material contract. This contract is for the issuance of an underfinitized contract action for the purchase of AH-64 Apache modernized target acquisition designation sight/pilots night vision sensor arrowhead kits, partial B-kits, tad electronic display and control, associated spares and support for the United States, Taiwan and the government of Israel. Work is to be performed in Orlando, Fla., with an estimated completion date of Oct. 31, 2013. One bid solicted with one bid received. Army Contracting Command, Aviation & Missile Command Contracting Center, CCAM-AP-B, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-06-C-0169).

Oshkosk Corp., Oshkosh, Wisc., was awarded on Feb. 5, 2010 a $52,090,900 firm-fixed-price contract for 1,451 each quanity of retrofit kits for command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance suite and battery upgrade/silent watch on the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected All Terrain Vehicle. Work is to be performed in Ishkosh, WI., with an estimated completion date of May 31, 2012. Five bids were solicted with five bids received. TACOM, CCTA-ADC-A, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-09-D-0111).

Dyncorp International LLC., Falls Church, Va., was awarded on Feb. 12, 2010 a $44,881,488 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the Combined Sercurity Transition Command. This is training and mentoring services contract with a two-year base period of performance and one (1) one-year option. Work is to be performed in Afghanistan, with an estimated completion date of Apr. 13, 2013. Bids were solicted on the World Wide Web with five bids received. U.S. Army research, Development and Engineering Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., is the contracting activity (W91CRB-10-C-0030).

Cajun Constructors, Inc., Baton Rouge, La., was awarded on Feb. 10, 2010 a $42,805,800 construction-firm-fixed-price contract for the West Bank and vicinity, New Orleans, Louisiana, Hurrican Protection Project, Westwego to Harvey Canal. Work is to be performed in Jefferson Parish, La., with an estimated completion date of Aug. 14, 2011. Bids were solicted on the World Wide Web with seven bids recived. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans District, New Orleans, La., is the contracting activity (W912P8-10-C-0046).

Phylway Construction, LLC., Thibodaux, La., was awarded on Feb. 4, 2010 a $41,308,168 firm-fixed-price contract for the West Bank and vicinity, New Orleans, Louisiana, Hurrican Protection Project, Westwego to Harvey Canal, New Westwego Pumping Stations to Orleans Village Levee, third enlargement. Work is to be performed in Jefferson Parish, La., with an estimated completion date of June 20, 2011. Bids were solicted via Fedteds with four bids recived. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans District, New Orleans, La., is the contracting activity (W912P8-09-D-0046).

Opus Northwest Construction LLC., Denver, Colo., was awarded on Feb. 9, 2010 a $37,759,000 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract is for the desgn/build contract for the design and construction of a new Armed Forces Reserve Center with field maintenance shop in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Work is to be performed in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 18, 2011. Bids were solcited through ASFI with 40 bid recived. USPFO for Iowa, Johnston, Iowa, is the contracting activity Hensel Phelps Contruction, Orlando, Fla., was awarded on Feb. 4, 2010 a $37,583,000 firm-fixed-price contract for Special Forces complex Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. This project will require construction of the primary facilities. Work is to be performed in Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., with an estimated completion date of Jan. 8, 2011. Bids were solicted on the World Wide Web with 16 bids received. U.S. Corps of Engineers, Moblie Regional Contracting Center, Mobile, Ala., is the contracting activity (W91278-10-C-0026).

Genral Atomics Aeronautical System, Poway, Calif., was awarded on Feb. 12, 2010 a $36,683,850 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract. This contract is for logistics support contract for warrior alpha/warrior block 0 unmanned aircraft systems at multiple OCONUS locations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. Work is to be performed in San Diego, Calif., with an estimated completion date of Nov. 15, 2011. One bid was solicted with one bid received. U.S. Army Contracting Command, AMCOM Contracting Center, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-10-C-0044).

Lockheed Martin Corp., Missiles and Fire Control, Grand Prairie, Texas, was awarded on Feb. 4, 2010 a $26,884,609 firm-fixed-price contract for High Moblity Artillery Rocket System Full Rate Production 5, option exercise for 12 Jordan Launchers. Work is to be performed in Grand Prairie, Texas, (40 percent) and East Camden, Ark., (60 percent) with an estimated completion date of Feb. 28, 2012. One bid was solicted with one bid received. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aviation & Missile Command Contracting Center, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting actiivty (W31P4Q-08-C-0001).

Lyda Swinerton, San Antonio, Texas., was awarded on Feb. 11, 2010 a $23,483,762 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract is for the construction of the Lackland Airman Training Center dining/classroom Facility #1. Work is to be performed on Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, with an estimated completion date of Oct. 2, 2011. Bids were solicted on the World Wide Web with 16 bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineer Distict, Fort Worth, Texas, is the contracting activity (W9126G-10-C-0017).

Mantech Telecommunications and Information Systems Corp, Chantilly, Va., was awarded on Feb. 12, 2010 a $23,389,656 time and material contract for services in Afghanistan. Work is to be performed in Afghanistan, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2010. One bid was solicted with one bids received. TACOM- Warren, AMSTA-AQ-ADED, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-09-C-0540).

AveroVironment, Incorp., Simi Valley, Calif., was awarded on Feb. 16, 2010 a $20,731,991 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract exercises priced options for 113 Army Digital Data Link (DDL) Systems, 113 Army initial spares packages and 127 Army DDL retrofit kits. Work is to be performed in Simi Valley, Calif., with an estimated completion date of Dec. 1, 2010. One bid was solicted with one bid received. U.S. Army Contracting Command/CCAM-AR-A is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-05-C-0338).

DRS Sustainment Systems, Inc., St. Louis, Mo., was awarded on Feb. 10, 2010 a $20,231,594 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for resent of 42 each of M1200 armored Knight vehicles. Work is to be performed in St.Louis, Mo., with an estimated completion date of Feb. 28, 2011. One bid was solicted with one bids received. TACOM Contracting Center, Warren, CCTA-AHL-C, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-10-C-0173).

Head, Inc., Columbus, Ohio, was awarded on Feb. 4, 2010 a $19,032,984 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract includes, but is not limited to replacement of the existing asphalt taxiway keels, widening the taxiway keel, and narrowing the existing taxiway width. Work also includes mill and overlay of existing taxiway shoulders, replacement of taxiway edge lighting and airfield pavement markings. Work is to be performed at Altus Air Force Base, Okla., with an estimated completion date of Nov. 29, 2012. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with six bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Tulsa District, Tulsa, Okla., is the contracting activity (W912BV-10-C-2001).

Edward Kraemer & Sons, Inc., Plain, WI., was awarded on Feb. 12, 2010 a $19,025,000 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract is for the design/build constuction contract to design and construct safety improvements on the Mississippi River along the lower embankments at Lock & Dam 3, near Red Wing, Minn. Work is to be performed in Diamond Bluff, WI., with an estimated completion date of Sept. 30, 2011. Three bids were solicted with two bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District, St. Paul, Minn., is the contracting activity (W912ES-10-C-0011).

TRU-Hitch, Inc., Pleasant, Vallet, Conn., was awarded on Feb. 16, 2010 a $17,733,259 firm-fixed-price contract for 105 each Interim Stryker recovery systems with associated basic issue items, logistic packages and authorized stockage list package. Work is to be performed in Pleasant Vally., Conn., with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2010. One bid was solicted with one bid received. TACOM-Warren, CCTA-ATB-D-Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-09-C-0498).

Niche, Inc., New Bedford, Mass., was awarded on Feb. 16, 2009 a $16,718,685 firm-fixed-price contract for the procurement of 9,111 each low velocity parachute systems. Work is to be performed in New Bedford, Mass., with an estimated completion date of Aug. 31, 2010. Four bids were solicted with fpur bids received. Research Development & Engineering Command Contracting Center, Natick Contracting Division, Natick, Mass., is the contracting activity (W58P05-09-D-0007).

NAVY

Parker-Hannifin Corp., Irvine Calif., is being awarded a $46,044,353 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract with a maximum ordering quantity of 141 hydraulic subsystems kits. The initial delivery order is for ten kits and is valued at $3,154,740. Additional support items procured under this action include technical and program support items such as manuals, configuration management, and spare parts kits. Work will be performed in Albany, Ga., and work is expected to be complete by Feb 19, 2015. Contract funds will not expire by the end of the current fiscal year. This contract is a full and open competition award to Parker-Hannifin Corporation as they won the competition for the M9 Ace Hydraulic Upgrades. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity (M67854-09-D-5019).

Raytheon Co., Integrated Defense Systems, Tewksbury, Mass., is being awarded a $27,828,683 not-to-exceed modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-05-C-5346) for common display system (CDS) hardware and software integration with the Integrated Bridge Console and Distributed Control Workstation hardware in support of shipyard hull mechanical and electrical activation. The purpose of this modification is to incorporate the CDS hardware and software integration related changes in support of DDG 1000 program ship activation activities in the 2011 timeframe. These integration efforts represent changes to the current requirements of total ship computing environment software development. Work will be performed in Portsmouth, R.I., (66.1 percent); Tewksbury, Mass., (22.9 percent); Moorestown, N.J., (8.3 percent); and the remaining 2.7 percent of effort will be performed in San Diego, Calif., Andover, Mass., and Sudbury, Mass. Work is expected to be completed by May 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Booz Allen Hamilton, McLean, Va. (N00421-10-D-0005); Deloitte Consulting, LLP, Alexandria, Va., (N00421-10-D-000); National Technologies Associates, Inc., Alexandria, Va. (N00421-10-D-0007); and Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, Calif. (N00421-10-D-0008), are each being awarded indefinite-delivery/ indefinite-quantity multiple award contracts for management, organizational, and business improvement services, financial and business solutions, and human resources services supporting Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Corporate Operations and Comptroller offices. The aggregate not-to-exceed amount for these multiple award contracts combined is $16,338,000, and the companies will have the opportunity to bid on each individual task order. Work will be performed in Patuxent River, Md., however, services may be performed at any of the following NAVAIR sites: St. Inigoes, Md.; Lakehurst N.J.; Point Mugu, Calif.; China Lake, Calif.; Orlando Fla.; Cherry Point, N.C.; Jacksonville, Fla., and North Island, Calif. Work performed under these contracts is expected to be completed in February 2011. Contract funds in the amount of $40,000 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. These contracts were solicited via a multiple award electronic request for proposals and five offers were received. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

Boeing Co., Huntington Beach, Calif., is being awarded an $8,010,427 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for engineering and technical services in support of the AN/USQ-82(V) design agent, and configuration management and technical engineering services lifecycle support of the Data Multiplex System, Fiber Optic Data Multiplex System, Gigabit Ethernet Data Multiplex System and Ship's Data Multiplex System networks installed in the fleet and at land-based test sites. Work will be performed in Huntington Beach, Calif., (40 percent); Philadelphia, Pa., (25 percent); Moorestown, N.J., (6 percent); Wallops Island, Va., (6 percent); Orlando, Fla., (6 percent); Dam Neck, Va., (6 percent); Great Lakes, Ill., (6 percent); and various other locations (5 percent), and is expected to be completed by February 2015. Contract funds in the amount of $213,000 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division, Philadelphia, Pa., is the contracting activity (N65540-10-D-0006).

The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Mo., is being awarded a $6,067,051 not-to-exceed modification to a previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N00019-08-D-0013) to provide 300 hours of persistent unmanned aerial vehicle intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance services in support of naval maritime missions. Work will be performed in Bingen, Wash., (65 percent) and St. Louis, Mo., (35 percent), and is expected to be completed in July 2010. Contract funds in the amount of $6,067,051 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

AIR FORCE

Lockheed Martin Corp, of Marietta, Ga., was awarded a $86,200,000 contract which will provide for the C-5M reliability enhancement and reengineering program. At this time, $23,169,488 has been obligated. 716 AESG/SYK, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8625-09-D-6485).

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., of San Diego, Calif., was awarded a $15,386,715 contract which will provide design of test articles, fabrication of test articles, integration, qualification and tests as appropriate for Spiral 3 changes. At this time, $9,500,000 has been obligated. 303 AESG/SYK, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity (F33657-0I-C-4600).

Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc., of Herndon, Va., was awarded a $10,114,526 contract which will provide the Air Force Material Command Air Force global logistics support with emerging automation identification technology analysis, enterprise data reports and control validation reports in order to develop innovative and secure solutions for potential application throughout the Air Force enterprise. At this time, $129,446 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska is the contracting activity (SP0700-98-D-4002).

Applied Research Associates, Incorporated of Albuquerque, New Mexico was awarded a $7,827,547 contract which will provide the development and demonstration of one Automated Field Intravenous Reconstitution System to Air Force requirement specifications. This unit is to develop compact, energy-efficient automated systems that will be capable of producing packaged intravenous fluids on demand for use in military field hospitals. At this time, $2,209,000 has been obligated. 77th AESG/PSK, Brooks City-Base, Texas is the contracting activity (FA8902-07-C-1012).

Rockwell Collins, Inc. of Cedar Rapids, Iowa was awarded a $6,497,108 contract which will provide for the building and testing of ten tactical targeting network technology terminals that meet very specific requirements. At this time, $6,497,108 has been obligated. AFRL/RIKD of Rome, New York is the contracting activity (FA8650-06-D-7636).

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

Integrys Energy Services, Inc., De Pere, Wis. is being awarded a maximum $12,946,555 firm fixed price contract for electricity. Other locations of performance are throughout Illinois. Using services are Army, Air Force and federal civilian agencies. There were originally 74 proposals solicited with three responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is May 31, 2012. The contracting activity is the Defense Energy Support Center (DESC), Fort Belvoir, Va., (SP0600-10-D-8005).

Omega Apparel, Incorporated, Smithville, Tenn.,* is being awarded a maximum $6,868,800 firm fixed price, total set-aside, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contract for men's dress trousers. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Army. The original proposal was solicited with ten responses. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is June 18, 2011. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia (DSCP), Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM1C1-10-D-1041).

DOD Announces Return of Facilities in Belgium


The Department of Defense today announced that it will return ten buildings at Florennes Air Base, Belgium, in 2010 to the host nation of Belgium.

The return involves ten empty buildings, which formerly housed the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's Tactical Leadership School. The school relocated to Spain's Los Llanos Air Base in June 2009, therefore the buildings are now excess to DoD's needs.

The return of the buildings will have no impact on Department of Defense personnel.

U.S. Forces Europe has begun the process of returning the buildings to the host nation of Belgium. The annual operating cost savings by returning these buildings is estimated to be approximately $1.8 million.

For additional information regarding this announcement, please contact U.S. Air Forces in Europe Office of Public Affairs at 011-49-6371-6558 or pa.ops@ramstein.af.mil.

Guard Evacuates Downed Helicopter's Passengers

American Forces Press Service

W.Va., Feb. 19, 2010 - Thirteen of the 17 passengers stranded in a remote region of West Virginia's Pocahontas County have been evacuated from a Navy MH-60S Knighthawk helicopter that was forced to land in the area yesterday, National Guard officials said.

Rescued passengers are being evaluated by emergency services agencies and transported to a local hospital for further evaluation and treatment.

West Virginia Army National Guard medics still are at the landing site and are working with emergency crews to evacuate the remaining passengers, said Mike Cadle, the state public affairs officer.

The helicopter reportedly was carrying passengers from Fort Pickett, Va., to Camp Dawson in Preston County, W.Va. Three members of the West Virginia National Guard were on board the aircraft.

The aircraft was participating in Operation Southbound Trooper X, an annual military exercise focusing on the integration of U.S. and NATO tactics and procedures as well as interservice coordination and capabilities.

A West Virginia Army National Guard HH-60 Black Hawk helicopter located the downed aircraft at about 7:15 p.m. yesterday. Two medics were lowered to the landing site to assess the situation and assist the injured.

Rescue personnel reported several injuries to the passengers, but the extent of those injuries still is being determined.

A West Virginia Air National Guard C-130 Hercules aircraft from the 130th Airlift Wing based here has been circling the site to maintain communications with the downed aircraft.

On-site rescue efforts are being coordinated by the West Virginia Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and the West Virginia National Guard.

The National Guard is working with local officials to deliver food, water, blankets and other essential items to the rugged, snow-covered site, which lies in northwestern Pocahontas County.

(From a West Virginia National Guard news release.)

Military Services on Track With Recruiting Goals

American Forces Press Service

Feb. 19, 2010 - All four active services and the six reserve components met or exceeded their recruiting goals for the month of January, Defense Department officials said today.

At the same time, the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force retained near or above mission goals through the first four months of fiscal 2010, a Pentagon news release says. Attrition in all reserve components is within acceptable limits.

Here is the recruiting breakdown for January:

Army: 8,513 accessions, with a goal of 8,393 for 101 percent;

Navy: 3,012 accessions, with a goal of 3,012 for 100 percent;

Marine Corps: 3,035 accessions, with a goal of 3,024 for 100 percent;

Air Force: 2,593 accessions, with a goal of 2,593 for 100 percent;

Army National Guard: 4,402 accessions, with a goal of 4,100 for 107 percent;

Army Reserve: 2,272 accessions, with a goal of 2,229 for 102 percent;

Navy Reserve: 511 accessions, with a goal of 511 for 100 percent;

Marine Corps Reserve: 1,130 accessions, with a goal of 819 for 138 percent;

Air National Guard: 563 accessions, with a goal of 470 for 120 percent; and,

Air Force Reserve: 772 accessions, with a goal of 772 for 100 percent.

(From a Defense Department news release.)

Vietnam Education Center

Ill Teela Sits Out 20K Biathlon Race


By Tim Hipps
Special to American Forces Press Service

Feb. 19, 2010 - U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program biathlete Sgt. Jeremy Teela of the Vermont National Guard sat out the Olympic men's 20-kilometer individual race yesterday because of illness. "I came down with something last night, and this morning my sinuses were all jammed up," Teela said via telephone. "I went for a little workout this morning before breakfast, and I wasn't going to be good enough to compete at this level, so I'm taking a break and letting one of the other guys compete."

Wynn Roberts, 21, of Battle Lake, Minn., substituted for Teela, who was scheduled to start 18th among 88 competitors.

"He's a younger guy, but he's really talented," Teela said of Roberts. "He hasn't had a chance yet to race, and he probably wasn't going to, but I think he'll do fine covering my spot."

Teela said he hopes he has only a head cold.

"I'm not sure, but it's enough where I can tell there's a difference in my body," he said. "When something is messed up just a little bit, at this level, an athlete can feel it. I wouldn't be affected driving, but for what we do, it's different."

Teela led Team USA's four competitors with a ninth-place finish in the 10-kilometer sprint Feb. 14 and a 24th-place finish in the 12.5-kilometer pursuit Feb. 16. He had even higher hopes for yesterday's event.

"I'm throttled," he said. "This is a really important race. It's one of the bigger chances we have as a team. We have five chances here. But this one, out of all our chances, is the real deal, so I'm just disappointed."

Teela, 33, of Heber City, Utah, planned to watch the race on television.

"I will watch it, but watching it is the worst pain I can imagine," Teela said of having to watch in place of competing. "But I've got to watch it, because I've got to support these guys."

Tella said he expects to be ready for the 15k mass-start relay event scheduled Feb. 21.

"I'm sure I'll be fine for the relay," Teela said. "Hopefully, I can kick this by then."

(Tim Hipps works at the U.S. Army Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Command public affairs office.)

Historical Project Documents Navy Diversity

By Christen N. McCluney
Special to American Forces Press Service

Feb. 19, 2010 - African-Americans have a long legacy in the military that began with the Revolutionary War and has continued to this day. To highlight this legacy, the Naval History and Heritage Command is working on a project documenting the history of diversity in the Navy from 1775 to the present through a variety of products including oral histories, narratives, chronology, photographs and a book.

The diversity project covers not only African-Americans but also women, Hispanics, Native Americans and Asians. It also looks at religious diversity as well.

"African-Americans have always desired to support the nation in hopes that a better society would emerge for them," said Regina Akers, a historian at the command and an expert on African-American history, during a Feb. 17 interview on the Pentagon Channel podcast "Armed with Science: Research and Applications for the Modern Military."

Diversity is a both strength and a strategic imperative for the Navy and its mission, Akers said, and the project is aligned with that to tell the story of how people of different ethnic and cultural backgrounds came to serve in the U.S. Navy and how their roles have changed over time.

"Many times, I've observed that young Americans will select a hero who is an athlete or business person and they don't consider the outstanding men and women that served in the military," she said. "There is much to learn from their experiences."

For example, she said, Navy Vice Adm. Samuel L. Gravely Jr. was the first African-American to be promoted to admiral and to command a war ship. During his time in the military from the 1940s to the 1980s, he faced many challenges. Early in his career -- when his duties were not equal to his qualifications -- he did not let that deter him, Akers said, believing every job was an opportunity to learn.

Gravely used his extra time to take correspondence courses, and when the opportunity for a better assignment arose, his test results, performance evaluations and experience made him one of the most qualified applicants.

Gravely's formula for success was "education plus motivation plus preservation," Akers said, and these and other factors helped him excel in his Navy career.

The oral history portion of the project helps to bring life to the subject matter, Akers said. "Oral history is critical," she said. A written report, she explained, usually tells what happened. But an oral history explains how it happened and provides perspective.

Society is moving away from paper-based communication, Akers noted, so this historical research is important for the future.

"In the past, letters and other correspondence were able to capture history," she said. "With technology today, one writes e-mails that are likely to be deleted. The research needs to continue so that we can understand what blacks and other minorities have done and are doing in uniform."

One of the biggest challenges Akers said she has experienced is that many veterans think they don't have a story worth telling.

"Some don't understand the significance of their experiences, and you have to help them appreciate them and why someone would be interested," she said. But once they do participate, she added, many find it to be cathartic.

"It can bring healing and peace to a part of life that was unsettled for them, she said, "and they are honored that their history will be a part of the government's official archives."

"Heroic," "determined" and "sacrificial" are three words that Akers said describe the legacy of African-Americans in the armed forces. More information and accounts of the past, she said, will add to the body of knowledge.

"Today's military is much more diverse than it has ever been," Akers said. "But it doesn't mean that racial equality and gender equality has necessarily been achieved. All the missing pages relating to minorities in the history of the Navy and of the United States have not been filled, so the study needs to continue so we can learn more and better understand their experiences."

(Christen N. McCluney works in the Defense Media Activity's emerging media directorate.)

Bobsled Teams Prepare for Weekend Events


By Tim Hipps
Special to American Forces Press Service

Feb. 19, 2010 - The three men's U.S. Olympic bobsled teams -- all to be piloted by a current or former National Guard member -- are ready for action this weekend. Army Sgt. John Napier of the Vermont National Guard, Army Sgt. Mike Kohn of the Virginia National Guard and Steven Holcomb, a former member of the Utah National Guard, resumed their training at Whistler Sliding Center here Feb. 17.

"This is amazing," said Napier, who is scheduled to drive USA II with Steve Langton aboard. "It feels great to be sliding again, especially on this track. It's so fast and so fun. I love driving here. It's one of the most incredible feelings to guide a sled down this course. I can't wait to do it again tomorrow."

Napier arrived in Canada on Feb. 8 and spent several days in Vancouver, where he attended the opening ceremonies for the XXI Olympic Winter Games. He said it made him yearn to become a lifelong Olympian.

On the eve of his return to a bobsled track, Napier discussed the pre-competitive Olympic experience.

"Fifteen years of hard work to get here," he said. "I told a lot of people I would go through 10 times the troubles and sufferings to make it to this point, now that I know what it's about. I was fighting for something before I really knew what it was and didn't know what it was for. But now I know.

"Now I've witnessed it, and I'm like, 'Man, I'm hungry to keep going more, too,'" Napier continued. "I want four more Olympics after this. Being here all week and seeing the atmosphere and all the help of the volunteers, and just to see how large of an operation it is and how small a piece of the puzzle we are, is kind of cool. The ceremony was the big point that really stood out and said, 'Wow, you've made it.'"

His brief time out of the sled, however, made Napier itch to get back to work.

"We need to be on ice; we're bobsledders," Napier said. "Being here and having to wait for several days was difficult, so it feels amazing being [at the track] tonight."

Kohn will drive USA III. "I love this track," he said. "I really feel like this track suits my driving style well. I'll be honest; I was a little nervous, but we're from the U.S., and we don't back down from a challenge.

"I had a lot of help from the coaches and the other drivers," Kohn added, "plus, Todd Hays shared some of his lines with me. This track isn't nearly as difficult as I thought. I just need to dial it in and iron a few things out."

Holcomb, the reigning four-man world champion, will drive USA I with Curt Tomasevicz aboard.

"This is fantastic," Holcomb said. "The ice is smooth and in great condition. It's what you expect Olympic ice to be. It feels so nice to be back on ice again, because we've been waiting around for 10 days for this moment. It's nice to get after it again."

The bobsledders will make two more training runs down the track today. Competition is set for two heats each tomorrow night and the afternoon of Feb. 21. The medal ceremony is scheduled at 7 p.m. PST Feb. 21.

(Tim Hipps works in the U.S. Army Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Command public affairs office.)

Civil Affairs Teams Help Displaced Haitians

By Navy Lt. Arlo Abrahamson
Special to American Forces Press Service

Feb. 19, 2010 - Members of a U.S. special operations civil affairs team visited a sprawling tent city here yesterday as part of an effort to assess conditions in the camp and better align the delivery of food and medical aid. Civil affairs teams attached to the 82nd Airborne Division have been partnering with nongovernmental organizations, the United Nations and other relief agencies to ensure vital aid is being delivered to the people who are most in need.

"The assessments we make at this camp will be sent to other agencies and [organizations] who provide relief to the displaced people living here," said the leader of one team operating in the area, who asked not to be identified because he serves in special operations. "The reports we produce help keep these relief organizations better informed about the actual needs of the people."

Civil affairs specialists said their assessments in the camp are concentrated on community governance, medical conditions and security.

"It's important for us to actually go in these camps and get direct feedback from the people," the team leader said. "We find out there are things they do quite well as a community, despite the circumstances they're in, while in other areas they may need more assistance."

On any given day, that assistance may vary. A combat medic assigned to the team provided medical care to a Haitian girl who had fallen ill.

"I'm here to do medical assessments, but there's a point where you just have to help people when you see a need," the medic said. "It was a small gesture, but we did our part to make conditions better for people in this camp today."

(Navy Lt. Arlo Abrahamson serves in the Joint Forces Special Operations Component Command public affairs office.)