Military News

Wednesday, November 25, 2009

MILITARY CONTRACTS November 25, 2009

ARMY
General Dynamics Information Technology, Fairfax, Va., was awarded on Nov. 23, 2009 a $322,111,129 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to provide initial outfitting and transition services to support one new military medical facility, and the new additions and newly renovated spaces at one military facility in the National Capitol Region. Work is to be performed in Washington D.C. (10 percent); Bethesda, Md. (50 percent); and Fort Belvoir, Va. (40 percent); with an estimated completion date of Nov. 29, 2012. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with five bids received. U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity, Fort Detrick, Md., is the contracting activity (W81XWH-10-C-0025).

GM GDLS Defense Group, LLC., Sterling Heights, Mich., was awarded on Nov. 20, 2009 a $42,555,068 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to fund Stryker modernization program which will bring the program to Milestone B/preliminary design review. Work is to be performed in Sterling Heights, Mich. (81 percent); and London, Ontario, and Canada (19 percent); with an estimated completion date of Sept. 30, 2011. One bid solicited with one bid received. TACOM LCMC Stryker, Warren, Mich., was the contracting activity (W56HZV-07-D-M112).

BAE Systems, Nashua, N.H., was awarded on Nov. 23, 2009 a $41,982,576 firm-fixed-price contract for the purchase of 1,203 each of laser target locator modules. Work is to be performed in Nashua, N.H., with an estimated completion date of May 14, 2014. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with two bids received. U.S. Army Research, Development & Engineering Command, Acquisition Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., is the contracting activity (W91CRB-09-D-0029).

Alliant Tech Systems, Plymouth, Minn., Textron Defense Systems, Wilmington, Mass., were awarded on Nov. 20, 2009 a $41,074,271 cost plus incentive fee contract for the procurement of the 70 Spider XM-7 networked munitions. Work is to be completed in Pymouth, Minn. (30 percent); Wilmington, Mass. (53 percent); and Rocket Center, W.V., with an estimated completion date of Nov. 30, 2012. One bid solicited with one bid received. Army Contracting Command JM&L Contracting Center, Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., is the contracting activity (W15QKN-06-C-0154).

Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Co., Inc., Oak Brook, Ill., was awarded on Nov. 23, 2009 a $20,143,303 firm-fixed-price contract for the beach re-nourishment for Carolina Beach, Kure Beach, and Ocean Isle Beach and maintenance dredging of Masonboro Intel and Sand Bypassing, Brunswick County, N. C. Work is to be performed in Brunswick County, N.C., with an estimated completion date of Apr. 30, 2010. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with two bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District, Wilmington, N.C., is the contracting activity (W912HN-10-C-0005).

Kongsberg Defense, Konsberg, Norway, was awarded on Nov. 20, 2009 a $15,094,837 firm-fixed-price contract for a minimum 1,000 common remotely operated weapon station systems with a maximum of 6,500, also to include the acquisition of spare parts, dept operations as well as field service representatives, Work is to be performed in Johnstown, Pa., completion date of Aug. 1, 2013. Bids were solicited on the World Wide with three bids received. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Joint Munitions & Lethality Contracting Center Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., is the contracting activity (W15QKN-07-D-0018).

AECOM Government Services Inc., Fort Worth, Texas, was awarded on Nov. 24, 2009 a $20,126,971 sole source, cost plus fixed fee contract for the Iraqi asset management program services providing automated maintenance and logistics support for maintenance, training, supply automation, and management reporting tools to the Iraq Security Forces in the Iraq theater of operations. This is a six month bridge contract while a new long term contract is being competed. Work is to be performed in Iraq, with an estimated completion date of May 31, 2010. One bid solicited with one bid received. Rock Island Contracting Center, Rock Island, Ill., is the contracting activity (W52P1J-10-C-0007).

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Rolling Meadow, Ill., was awarded on Nov. 20, 2009 a $12,556,000 firm-fixed-price contract to purchase the next generation automatic test system. Work is to be performed in Rolling Meadows, Ill., with an estimated completion date of Apr. 28, 2011. One sole source bid was solicited with one bid received. Joint Munitions & Lethality Contracting Center, Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., was the contracting activity (W15QKN-10-C-0040).

Phylway Construction, LLC., Thibodaux, La., was awarded on Nov. 24, 2009 a $12,191,374 firm-fixed-price-construction contract for Lake Ponchatrain and Vicinity, La., project, North of airline highway, St. Charles Parish, Levee - Reach 2B from Good Hope to Cross Bayou-Phase 2. Work is to be performed in St. Charles Parish, La., with an estimated completion date of Jan. 17, 2011. Bids were solicited and restricted to multiple award task order contract pool with five bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans District, New Orleans, La., is the contracting activity (W912P8-09-D-0046).

Urban Associates, Inc., El Paso, Texas, was awarded on Nov. 23, 2009 a $11,012,029 firm-fixed-price contract. This construction project is entitled, F-22A Low Observance/ Composite Repair Facility, Building 898 at Holloman Air Force Base, Otero County, N.M. This project will place paint booths on an existing F-22 hanger at Holloman Air Force Base. Work is to be performed at Holloman Air Force Base, Otero County, N.M., with an estimated completion date of Jan. 31, 2011. Thirty five bids solicited with 16 bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Albuquerque District-CESPA-CT, Albuquerque, N.M., is the contracting activity (W912PP-10-C-0004).

AIR FORCE
Raytheon Technical Services Co., of Reston, Va., was awarded $93,186,713 contract which will provide for program management, operations, organizational and depot-level maintenance, logistics, sustainment engineering of all radar and support instrumentation, and the software maintenance management facility, to ensure successful mission accomplishment of the mobile radar sensors. At this time no money has been obligated. AF ISR Agency/A7KA of San Antonio, Texas is the contracting activity (FA7037-10-D-0001).

Kilgore Flares Co., of Toone, Tenn., was awarded a $54,996,692 contract which provides for procurement of infrared flare countermeasures. At this time, $24,075,876 has been obligated. 784 CBSG/PK, Hill Air Force Base, Utah is the contracting activit (FA8213-10-D-0012).

General Electric Aviation of Cincinnati, Ohio was awarded a $44,238,381 contract which provides for newly redesigned high pressure compressor and high pressure turbine assemblies, newly redesigned aging engine upgrade components, initial provisioning spares, and new technical data to support the service life extension plan and aging engine upgrade initiatives applicable to the engines used on the F-16 aircraft. At this time, the entire amount has been obligated. 448 SCMG/PKBC, Tinker Air Force Base, Okla., is the contracting activity (FA8104-05-C-0053, P00017).

Composite Engineering Incorporated was awarded a $37,551,848 contract which procures additional subscale aerial targets. At this time, $37,551,848 has been obligated. 691 ARSS/PK, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is the contracting activity (FA8678-10-C0051).

Lockheed Martin Corp., of Marietta, Ga., was awarded a $30,410, 132 contract which will provide for the C-5 avionics modernization program Lot VIII procurement of components for one lot of readiness spares package, one lot of peacetime operating spares, one lot of C-5 aircrew training device kit components and one lot of C-5 avionics modernization program kit components. At this time the entire amount has been obligated. 716 AESG/PK, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity (F33657-98-C-0006, P00226).

L-3 Communications Corp., of Arlington, Texas was awarded a $21,578,453 contract which will provide the Royal Moroccan Air Force two F-16 block 52 aircrew training devices and associated support. At this time the entire amount has been obligated. 677 AESG/SYK, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8621-10-C-6251).

L-3 Communications of Arlington, Texas was awarded a $20,967,607 contract which will provide a fully immersive block 40/50 F-16 Mission Training Center. At this time, the entire amount has been obligated. 677 AESG/SYK, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8621-09-C-6292, P00015).

Accenture National Security Services of King of Prussia, Pa., was awarded a $19,294,440 contract which will provide for the Air Force modeling and simulation training tool kit used to train the Joint Forces Commander, Joint Force Air component commander and their battle staff in multiple federation environments. At this time, $536,372 has been obligated. 653 ESW/CONS, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts is the contracting activity. (FA8731-06-C-001, P00031)

Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co., of Sunnyvale, Calif., was awarded a $11,500,000 contract which will provide for a reaction wheel shop set that uses new hybrid wheel bearings. At this time, $10,278,943 has been obligated. SMC/MCSW/PKA of El Segundo, Calif., is the contracting activity (F04701-02-C-0002, P00400).

NAVY
Raytheon Co., Integrated Defense Systems, Tewksbury, Mass., is being awarded an $84,400,000 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-05-C-5346) to exercise an option for FY10 class services engineering efforts to facilitize for testing mission systems equipment, produce test documentation, conduct component and design level verification tests and maintain related design and test class documentation for the DDG 1000 Zumwalt Class destroyer program. Work will be performed in Portsmouth, R.I. (38.5 percent); Moorestown, N.J. (19.3 percent); Marlborough, Mass. (16.6 percent); Sudbury, Mass. (12.6 percent); Tewksbury, Mass. (5.5 percent); Minneapolis, Minn. (3.5 percent); San Diego, Calif. (2.2 percent); and Towson, Md. (1.8 percent); and is expected to be completed by Dec. 31, 2013. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Raytheon Co., Integrated Defense Systems, Tewksbury, Mass., is being awarded a $46,627,723 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-05-C-5346) to exercise an option for class services engineering to support design assurance, develop verification plans and conduct verifications for the DDG 1000 Zumwalt Class destroyer program. Work will be performed in Tewksbury, Mass. (28.3 percent); Portsmouth, R.I. (27.1 percent); Falls Church, Va. (12.8 percent); Sudbury, Mass. (11.9 percent); Minneapolis, Minn. (7.4 percent); Washington, D.C. (6.9 percent); Moorestown, N.J. (3.7 percent); San Diego, Calif. (1.1 percent); and Marlborough, Mass. (0.8 percent); and is expected to be completed by December 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY
Valley Apparel, LLC, Knoxville, Tenn.*, is being awarded a maximum $15,395,000 firm fixed price, total set aside contract for universal camouflage pattern parkas. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Army. The original proposal was Web solicited with five responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Mar. 24, 2011. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM1C1-10-D-1013).

Bethel Industries, Inc., Jersey City, N.J.*, is being awarded a maximum $13,740,816 firm fixed price, indefinite quantity, total set aside contract for navy task force working/utility uniforms. Other locations of performance include New Jersey and Mississippi. Using service is Navy. The original proposal was Web solicited with 15 responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract is exercising second option year period. The date of performance completion is Nov. 29, 2011. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM1C1-08-D-1028).

Altec Industries, Inc., Birmingham, Ala., is being awarded a maximum $5,658,000 fixed price with economic price adjustment contract for 30 ton telescopic truck cranes. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Foreign Military Sales. There were originally seven proposals solicited with three responses. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Aug. 3, 2010. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM500-04-D-0090-0099).

'First-strike Ration' Aims for Better Nutrition

By Christen N. McCluney
Special to American Forces Press Service

Nov. 25, 2009 - Several military organizations are working together to provide soldiers with healthy, good-tasting, sustainable and nutritionally sound combat rations. "We're charged with a fairly awesome task, and that is to fuel the Defense Department's most flexible and adaptable weapons platform, and that of course is the individual warfighter," said Gerry Darsch, director of the Defense Department's Combat Feeding Program at the Massachusetts-based Natick Soldier Systems Center during a Nov. 23 interview on the Pentagon Channel podcast "Armed with Science: Research and Applications for the Modern Military.

Darsch was joined by Andy Young, chief of the Military Nutrition Division at the U.S. Army Institute of Environmental Medicine.

Because many military personnel have jobs similar to those in the civilian sector, their nutritional requirements aren't going to be very much different from those of their civilian counterparts, Young said, but some servicemembers in operational specialties do require more fuel and energy then most civilians. Achieving their nutritional requirements while working in the field can be especially difficult, he added.

The MRE -- shorthand for its designation in the supply system as Meal, Ready-to-Eat -- is the standard military ration. Each meal provides one-third of the military-recommended dietary allowance and must meet a variety of requirements, including long shelf life, tolerance of changes in temperature and stability in varying conditions, Darsch said.

"We do have a business philosophy here, and that is, 'Warfighter recommended, warfighter tested, and warfighter approved,'" he said. "And that is driving our continuous product-improvement program."

One of the latest developments that has come out of this program is known as the first-strike ration, or FSR. Before its introduction, servicemembers who were outside of a forward operating base for two to seven days were given MREs to travel with. Because of space limitations, soldiers would field-strip the meal and throw away more than half of the food, including a large portion of nutrients.

"The first-strike ration, in essence, is issued at one per warfighter per day, instead of two or three MREs," Young said. It reduces the weight and volume of the MRE by 50 percent, and also is more cost-efficient.

"The first-strike ration provides all the components that can be easily eaten on the move," Young said. "And we now can regain control, if you will, of nutrition and make sure that those warfighters are getting the nutrients that they so desperately need to maintain [or] enhance both cognitive and physical performance."

Working with the National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine, the group convened a panel of nutrition experts from all over the world, many of whom had served in the military, and challenged them to get the best nutrition possible into a limited amount of space.

"After that, it was simply a matter of testing the actual performance improvements and capabilities of the ration in human subjects in the field conditions that would be used," Young said.

Focus groups and surveys revealed what products were being left behind, and from there, a list was put together of items that servicemembers wanted.

Packaging was one of the main issues, Darsch said. When the design of an electrolyte drink was changed into an hourglass-shaped package with a feature that allowed water to be added directly from a canteen or CamelBak, the consumption rate went from 33 percent to more than 70 percent.

The addition of a shelf-stable, pocket-style sandwich was another request from soldiers. Because microwave ovens and frozen food items aren't available in the field, the combat feeding team's technologists used "hurdle technology," a packaging process that balances water, atmosphere and acidity in the package, creating hurdles to bacterial growth and keeping the products shelf-stable.

The groups did field tests with the U.S. Forest Service, testing the rations on forest firefighters who have similar metabolic and work demands as infantry soldiers on the ground, Young said. They later tested the rations at Fort Benning, Ga., on the 75th Ranger Regiment's Pre-Ranger Course and with the Marine Corps Officer Candidate School in Quantico, Va.

The next goal, Darsch said, is to expand the first-strike rations menu from three to nine meals and to go into the field and allow warfighters an opportunity to rate the new menus.

"The most important thing about the first-strike in particular, and nutrition in general, for the warrior in the field is, it's not nutrition unless it's eaten," he said. "So it doesn't do you any good to take the package; you've got to actually eat it. And that's why the first-strike is such an important step forward for the particular audience it was targeted at -- that it actually improves consumption, and that, in turn, improves the nutrition."

(Christen N. McCluney works in the Defense Media Activity's emerging media directorate.)

Guard Wife Spreads Thanksgiving Spirit

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

Nov. 25, 2009 - Amanda Bailey has a lot to thankful for this Thanksgiving, with her husband, Army Spc. Christopher Bailey home from Iraq for rest and relaxation leave. And as head of his National Guard unit's family readiness group, she's helped to galvanize a communitywide show of appreciation for families of its deployed troops. Bailey, a military policeman with the Alabama Army National Guard's Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 203rd Military Police Battalion, returned home to Ardmore, Ala., earlier this week for 15 days of R&R.

"It's fantastic," Amanda said of the timing, five months into her husband's first deployment since joining the Guard six years ago. The Baileys and their three children will enjoy two Thanksgiving feasts this year: one today with Specialist Bailey's family, and another on Thanksgiving Day with Amanda's family.

Meanwhile, the detachment's family readiness group has been hard at work, ensuring every unit family whose loved one is deployed has a memorable Thanksgiving, as well.

With its families spread throughout Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee, getting together to celebrate as a group wasn't a viable option, Amanda said. So the family readiness group initiated the next best thing, sponsoring fundraising events and gathering donations from the local community and corporations.

As a result, 53 Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment families received gift certificates for a Thanksgiving turkey or ham. Already looking ahead to Christmas, Amanda said she expects an even bigger outpouring of support for the families of all 85 deployed soldiers.

"The response from the community has been really amazing," she said. "People out there all want to help and show their support." One donor made a $500 contribution and wants to begin offering monthly assistance to some of the needier families, she said.

Bailey, still fighting jet lag from his flight home from Iraq, said he's passed word of the family readiness group's activities to his unit members. "It's a great feeling to know that people are doing these little extra things," he said. "It means a lot."

In addition to gift certificates, Amanda signed each of the 85 families up to receive free copies of a children's Thanksgiving activity book through Operation Thanksgiving Eagle.

The program, sponsored by the Association of the U.S. Army and underwritten by BAE Systems and Raytheon, provided 500 copies of "It's a Family Thanksgiving! A Celebration of an American Tradition for Children and Their Families" to military children stateside and overseas.

The book, written by Deborah Fink, introduces young readers and their families to the history, foods and traditions associated with Thanksgiving, while recognizing families separated during the holiday because of deployments.

"We at AUSA believe that projects such as this are important ways to draw Army families together and celebrate our history," said John Grady, AUSA's public affairs director.

VA Initiative Aims to Improve Veteran Health Care

By Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael J. Carden
American Forces Press Service

Nov. 25, 2009 - Officials with the nation's two largest electronic medical records systems announced a pilot program today designed to further enhance health-care services for military veterans. The Department of Veterans Affairs and Kaiser Permanente plan to exchange their records information using the Nationwide Health Information Network, which was developed by the Health and Human Services Department last year. The initiative is scheduled to begin next month, VA officials said.

The network allows government and several private health care providers to share integrated delivery networks, pharmacies, labs and patient information.

"The ability to share critical health information is essential to interoperability," VA Secretary Eric K. Shinseki said in a written statement issued today. "Utilizing the NHIN's standards and network will allow organizations like VA and the Department of Defense to partner with private-sector health care providers to promote better, faster and safer care for veterans."

VA and Kaiser Permanente plan to invite veterans in San Diego this week who receive health care from both organizations to participate in the pilot program, VA officials said, noting that patients must formally consent to their information being shared among different organizations.

"Veterans who respond and ask to participate will enable their public- and private-sector health care providers and doctors to share specific health information electronically, safely, securely and privately," the VA statement said.

The NHIN network also works to cut health care costs for patients and providers through reducing redundancy in medical services.

"Securely digitizing American's health-care information is only the first step in realizing the cost savings and improved quality benefits possible with health-care technology," said Dr. Andrew M. Wiesenthal, associate executive director of The Permanente Federation, in the VA statement.

"The reality is that most people receive care from multiple providers," Wiesenthal said. "Without the ability for caregivers and patients to have access to their data, all of the time, there is the possibility for wasted time and resources duplicating tests and procedures."

The Defense Department will be included in the second phase of the pilot program early next year, officials said.

Joint Program Aims to Reduce Firefighter Injuries

By Samantha L. Quigley
American Forces Press Service

Nov. 25, 2009 - Firefighting may be near the top of the Defense Department's list of high-risk occupations, but there's a move afoot to make it safer. Defense Department firefighter injury reports -- more than 1,000 new incidents each year -- have cost the department nearly $30 million a year.

When the Defense Safety Oversight Council realized more than a year ago that Firefighter injury-related lost time rates were higher than any other civilian occupation within the department, it sought help in turning the situation around.

Enter the Department of Defense Fire and Emergency Service Working Group.

"[The Defense Safety Oversight ] wanted us to look into what was causing the injuries to see if we could come up with suggestions on reducing the injury rates and the lost work days," said Carl Glover, the director of the Navy Fire and Emergency Service for Navy Installations Command. "[The working group] thought that the awareness training would be an opportunity to ... spread the work on the problem and create some awareness and potentially reduce the [accident rates]."

Glover served as chairman of the working group. He no longer holds that position, but continues to be engaged in the project.

The Firefighter Injury Prevention Training project started with a 26-month analysis of firefighter injuries within the Navy, he said. Of all the injuries reported, 41 percent were classified as "falls, slip, trip, or bodily exertion." Of those cases, 40 percent, or 75 incidents, were directly related to the firefighter entering or exiting the fire apparatus and lifting patients.

Comparing Navy incidents with those of other department components showed similar types of injures. "We operate under the same instruction and same methodology," Glover explained.

The resulting effort to lower the rate of injury is an eight-lesson, Web-based training program. The multimedia program uses text, audio, video, photographs and graphics to demonstrate proper techniques for the actions determined to lead to falls, slips, trips, and exertion injuries.

Video for the course which was shot at Bolling Air Force Base in the nation's capital, and features participants from Defense Logistics Agency, the Air Force, Army and Marines. The Navy has been using it for about a year, Glover said. Funded by the Defense Safety Oversight , the course also has been provided to the other services.

Though it's being used and is creating awareness of the issues in question, it's too soon to tell if it's actually been effective in lowering incident rates, Glover said.

"We've had some internal Navy feedback that it's well-received," he said. "We just don't know if it's achieving its desired result yet. I don't have any statistical numbers to [prove] that our number of injuries have reduced."

The plan is to evaluate the program's success once it's yielded enough data to study.

"If it's successful, maybe we approach DSOC for a Part Two, but tackle a different specific type of injury," Glover said. "Or, if it's not successful, then we'll go back to DSOC and say, 'Is there some other option we can look [at] ... to see if there's some other program we could implement to reduce the injuries.'"

The Navy intends to make the course mandatory for all new firefighters and an annual requirement for all firefighters.

And though it was created for Defense Department civilian, military and contracted firefighters, the program could easily be of value to any firefighter, Glover said.

Respite Child Care Expands to All 50 States

By Samantha L. Quigley
American Forces Press Service

Nov. 25, 2009 - It's a few hours a month, but the break the Armed Services YMCA Respite Child Care program provides parents with a deployed spouse always is welcome. And since the program's Oct. 1 nationwide expansion, many more parents will benefit. The Armed Services YMCA, as part of a Defense Department contract, provides health and wellness opportunities, including the Respite Child Care program, for reserve-component servicemembers and their families across the country through their local YMCAs.
This means deploying Guardsmen and reservists and their families are eligible for a full YMCA membership for three months before deployment, the 12 months of deployment, and three months after, said Mike Landers, deputy national director of the Armed Services YMCA.

"This entire health and wellness contract was designed for them because they don't have the infrastructure that the active-duty families that live near major military installations have," Landers said. "So the YMCAs, the Pentagon thought, would be a great place for them to be able to connect with other Guard and reserve families who have their same circumstance."

The Respite Child Care program, part of that contract, provides up to 16 hours of child care for families of deployed Guard and reserve personnel. It's meant to be a "short break" for the parent or guardian responsible the child's care, Landers said, and not a substitute for full-time or daily care.

"The respite care was designed to be an opportunity for the mom, whose husband is deployed, or the [dad] whose wife is deployed, to be able to drop their kids off to just have a little peace and quiet, to go to the commissary, to go shopping, to do whatever they need to do," Landers said.

During the first year, however, only the families in 10 pilot states were able to take advantage of the program, which must be offered through state licensed and certified programs and is free to parents. More than 220 children were served. Since Oct. 1, when the program expanded to all 50 states, another 200 children have taken advantage of the program.

"We saw a pretty significant uptick in the demand during the month of October," he said. "There are hundreds and hundreds of YMCAs that are now signed up to do this. I think we'll see a big uptick for the remainder of the year."

Armed Services YMCA officials said they would like to see those using the program establish a monthly routine. This, they explained, makes it easier for the participating YMCAs, since most don't have much excess capacity in their child care programs.