Military News

Monday, July 20, 2009

Defense, Veterans Affairs Collaborate on Brain Injuries

By Navy Lt. Jennifer Cragg
Special to American Forces Press Service

July 20, 2009 - More than half of U.S. servicemembers seriously injured in Iraq or Afghanistan and admitted to Walter Reed Army Medical Center here suffer from traumatic brain injury, according to Defense Veterans Brain Injury Center officials. "The most common injury that we see is, of course, traumatic brain injury," said Dr. Lucille Beck, chief consultant for rehabilitation services for the Veterans Affairs Department, in a July 16 "Dot Mil Docs" interview on Pentagon Web Radio. "We have statistics from the Army and the Defense Veterans Brain Injury Center, and they are reporting about 52 percent of patients who are exposed to blast injuries and are admitted to Walter Reed Army Medical Center have a brain injury."

A survivor from an explosion can have burns, inhalation injuries and trauma to multiple body parts and organs, depending on the force of the blast, distance from the blast site and other factors, Beck said.

Traumatic brain injury frequently occurs as part of polytrauma, a medical term that means multiple traumatic injuries, at least one of which is life-threatening. The combination of injuries may include amputation, auditory and visual impairments, spinal cord injury, post-traumatic stress disorder and other medical problems.

"Everything that we do is mediated by the brain, [so] recovery of the brain and rehabilitation of the brain injury is crucial [and] critical to all of the [patient's] rehabilitation," she said. With that in mind, she added, what used to be called brain-injury centers have been expanded into polytrauma centers.

To meet its commitment of providing the best rehabilitative care possible, Veterans Affairs officials have developed the Polytrauma System of Care, designed to provide lifelong support and care during all phases of rehabilitation and recovery. VA has polytrauma rehabilitation centers in Minneapolis; Palo Alto, Calif.; Richmond, Va.; and Tampa, Fla.

Servicemembers and veterans dealing with traumatic brain injuries and polytrauma benefit from the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, a collaborative effort that began in 1992 to provide state-of-the-art clinical care, education, and research for servicemembers and veterans with traumatic brain injury. To meet a congressional mandate, a network was created that now includes 19 sites around the world, said Air Force Col. (Dr.) Michael S. Jaffee, national director for Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, who participated with Beck on "Dot Mil Docs."

"It has been interesting and exciting to be a part of the evolution of knowledge that we gained over the past several years," Jaffee said. "The traditional, conventional wisdom was that the more severe the injury, the worse was the prognosis in terms of returning to your baseline. Through the application of early intervention and advanced techniques, we have been able at times to enhance positive outcomes in severely injured patients beyond what would be expected."

The collaboration has yielded great benefits, Jaffee said.

"We have a lot of other research initiatives going on both in [the Defense Department], the VA, and civilian partners looking at the emerging technologies and therapies," Jaffee said. "[We are] looking at some of the latest advances where technology is helping to push the envelope and enhance the prognosis."

The collaboration has been extended to other federal agencies, such as the departments of Labor and Education, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control, he added.

"It ensures that our veterans are benefiting from the most up-to-date ... knowledge that has been gained in the civilian sector, and it allows the civilian sector to likewise benefit from the knowledge that we have gained from the treatment of servicemembers and veterans," Jaffee said.

Some NATO allies have adopted the centers' guidelines for the management of traumatic brain injuries on the battlefield, he added.

"I think the collaboration between the [Defense Department] and VA has had a lot of impact in development, and in many ways has had a worldwide impact based on the synergy that we have been able to provide in clinical care, research and education under one roof," Jaffee said.

(Navy Lt. Jennifer Cragg serves in the Defense Media Activity's emerging media directorate.)

Face of Defense: Mortuary NCO Ensures Dignified Transfer of Fallen

By Army Spc. Elisebet Freeburg
Special to American Forces Press Service

July 20, 2009 - Many people have trouble viewing the deceased or coping with the emotions of witnessing the transfer of a fallen comrade. For Army Staff Sgt. John A. Rosado, it is an honor to ensure fallen heroes are returned home in a timely and dignified manner. It is a regular part of Rosado's job to attend ramp ceremonies here, where U.S. and coalition forces stand in formation behind an open aircraft while the casket of a fallen hero is carried up the walkway. Paying their last respects to the one who gave all, troops salute the hero. The pallbearers, his former comrades, shoulder their heavy burden with somber faces as they slowly march past the long rows of servicemembers to the waiting plane.

"The purpose of a ramp ceremony is to give a final farewell to our comrades, especially for the unit who's suffering the loss," said Rosado, a reservist from Clermont, Fla. "It's to pay respect to the person who paid the ultimate sacrifice."

A soldier since 1993 and a civilian corrections officer for the Federal Bureau of Prisons, Rosado has worked in mortuary affairs since 2000 and is the Joint Sustainment Command Afghanistan mortuary affairs noncommissioned officer in charge.

"Our job is to make sure to expedite our fallen comrades back to loved ones in a timely manner," he said.

The mortuary affairs collection point here, one of two for U.S. troops in Afghanistan, serves regional commands South and West, and is managed by the NATO Maintenance and Supply Association. The collection point at Bagram Airfield serves regional commands North and East.

Rosado became a mortuary affairs specialist after a six-week course at Fort Lee, Va., that included working at a morgue, taking fingerprints of remains and assisting technicians in autopsies. Rosado helps to prepare fallen heroes for transfer to Dover Air Force Base, Del., where each receives a dignified transfer to family.

When Rosado receives notification of a fallen comrade, he first alerts personnel to stand by while he collects information about the arrival of the remains.

"In a respectful manner, with the unit escorts, we'll unload the remains from the plane," he said.

The mortuary affairs personnel and the unit escorts proceed to the mortuary collection point, where remains are screened for unexploded ordnance, ammunition and sensitive weapons.

"Once they're screened, they enter a holding area," Rosado said. "A chaplain will do a small, informal prayer over the remains with the unit representatives."

After the fallen troop's comrades leave, mortuary personnel remove personal effects from the remains. Dover personnel later will cleanse the remains and conduct an autopsy. Once the belongings have been inventoried and paperwork is completed, the remains will be stored in ice inside transfer cases in refrigerated vans.

Rosado then contacts the movement control team at the airfield to receive a transportation control number, scans the documents and sends them to the mobility section to book a flight.

Rosado's final duty is the ramp ceremony, organized through the 649th Regional Support Group. Rosado and mortuary personnel prepare by tying a U.S. flag over the transfer case. "It's so when the pallbearers load the case on the plane, the flag is already folded properly," he explained.

They then transport the flag-draped case to the flightline, where U.S. and coalition servicemembers line up in formation. The mortuary affairs specialists then bring the van forward to send the servicemember home.

"Not many people can [handle seeing] a deceased person, or the cause of death, in this state," Rosado said. "It's a privilege and an honor. It helps give the family closure."

(Army Spc. Elisebet Freeburg serves with the Joint Sustainment Command Afghanistan.)

DoD Announces 2009 Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Awards

The Department of Defense announced today the 2009 Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award recipients.

The award represents the highest recognition given by the U.S. government to employers for their outstanding support of their employees who serve in the National Guard and Reserve.

The 2009 recipients are:
AeroDyn Wind Tunnel LLC – Mooresville, N.C.
AstraZeneca International – Wilmington, Del.
Cambridge, MA Fire Department – Cambridge, Mass.
Consolidated Electrical Distributors, Inc. – Westlake Village, Calif.
First Data Corporation – Greenwood Village, Colo.
FMC Technologies – Houston, Texas
Jackson Parish Sheriff's Department – Jonesboro, La.
Marks, O'Neil, O'Brien & Courtney, P.C. – Philadelphia, Pa.
Microsoft Corporation – Redmond, Wash.
Mid America Kidney Stone Association – Kansas City, Mo.
NetJets – Woodbridge, N.J.
Ohio Department of Public Safety – Columbus, Ohio
Perpetual Technologies, Inc. – Indianapolis, Ind.
Santa Ana Police Department – Santa Ana, Calif.
TriWest Healthcare Alliance – Phoenix, Ariz.

"In the eight years our nation has been at war, America's employers - almost universally - have done an outstanding job of supporting their Citizen Warrior employees, said Dennis M. McCarthy, assistant secretary of defense for reserve affairs. "These fifteen employers are the 'best of the best' this year. They reflect the powerful synergy that exists between the men and women of the National Guard and Reserve, and their employers."

A record 3,200 National Guard and Reserve members or their family members from across the country nominated their employers for the Freedom Award this year. A national selection board comprised of senior Defense officials and business leaders selected the recipients. The Freedom Award will be presented to these employers during a formal ceremony Sept. 17, 2009 at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C.

The Freedom Award was instituted in 1996 under the auspices of the National Committee for Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve to recognize exceptional support from the employer community.

More information about the Freedom Award is available at http://www.FreedomAward.mil or by calling the ESGR office at (800) 336-4590.

Leadership: Up Close and Personal

Editor's Note: The author is a former servicemember.

July 20, 2009 (San Dimas, CA) American Heroes Press announced that the co-author of
Leadership: Texas Hold ‘em Style, Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.) will be a guest on the internet-based radio program Up Close & Personal, hosted by Bonnie D. Graham, on September 21, 2009 at 7PM Eastern.

Date: September 21, 2009
Time: 7PM EASTERN
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/BonnieDGraham

ABOUT THE PROGRAM
Produced and Hosted by
Bonnie D. Graham, a 12 year veteran of New York Radio, Up Close and Personal “is about the “AHA!” in your life. Guests share their expertise on Relationships, Dating, Marriage & Remarriage, Break-Ups, Communications, Workplace Challenges, Leadership, Success Strategies, Money, Food & Cooking, Health, Environment & more. If you're still stymied by the Mars vs. Venus cacophony in love or at work, feeling ambushed by a break-up or job loss, or ready for greater personal and professional success – you'll get inspiration and advice from guests who've been-there-done-that.”

ABOUT RAYMOND E. FOSTER
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton. He has completed his doctoral studies in business research. Raymond is a graduate of the West Point Leadership program and has attended law enforcement, technology and leadership programs such as the National Institute for Justice, Technology Institute, Washington, DC.

Raymond has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and is currently a faculty advisor and chair of the
Criminal Justice Program at the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

His first book,
Police Technology is used in over 100 colleges and universities nationwide. He latest book, Leadership: Texas Hold ‘em Style has been adopted by several universities for course work in leadership; by several civil service organizations and required reading for promotion; and, has been well received in the wider market.

ABOUT THE BOOK
Using poker as analogy for
leadership, Captain Andrew Harvey, CPD (ret.), Ed.D. and Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA found the right mix of practical experience and academic credentials to write a definitive book for leaders. Working together, Harvey and Foster have written Leadership: Texas Hold em Style. Most often leaders find they are given a set of resources people, equipment, funds, experience and a mission. As Foster noted, "You're dealt a certain hand. How you play that hand as a leader determines your success."

More than a book: A fun and entertaining journey through
leadership that includes an interactive website to supplement knowledge gained from the book.
Proven and Tested: Not an academic approach to
leadership, but rather a road-tested guide that has been developed through 50-years of author experience.
High Impact: Through the use of perspective, reflection, and knowledge, provides information that turns
leadership potential into leadership practice.
Ease of Application: Theory is reinforced with real-life experience, which results in accessible and practical tools leaders can put to use immediately.
High Road Approach: Personal character and ethical beliefs are woven into each leadership approach, so leaders do the right thing for the right reasons.
Uses Game of Poker: Rather than a dry approach that is all fact and no flavor, the game of poker is used as a lens through which to view
leadership concepts.

CONTACT INFORMATION
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret)
909.599.7530
raymond@hitechcj.com
www.police-writers.com

Gates Calls for Increase of 22,000 Soldiers

By John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service

July 20, 2009 - Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates today announced plans to add up to 22,000 soldiers to the U.S. Army's ranks. The plus-up of active duty troops will take the Army from 547,000 to 569,000 forces in what Gates characterized as a temporary increase of the Army's "end strength" for three fiscal years.

"This is an important and necessary step to ensure that we continue to properly support the needs of our commanders in the field while providing relief for our current force and their families," the secretary told reporters during a Pentagon news conference.

Gates pointed to escalating violence in Afghanistan and an added U.S. presence there, political turmoil in Pakistan and elimination of the so-called "stop-loss" policy of involuntarily extending a soldier's length of service as reasons behind the decision.

"The cumulative effect of these factors is that the Army faces a period where its ability to continue to deploy combat units at acceptable 'fill rates' is at risk," he said. "Based on current deployment estimates, this is a temporary challenge which will peak in the coming year and abate over the course of the next three years."

Some 130,000 American forces are in Iraq and 58,000 are in Afghanistan, where an influx of deploying troops will bring the number to 68,000 by the end of this year, defense officials said.

"These additional forces will be used to ensure that our deploying units are properly manned, and not to create new combat formations," the defense secretary said, adding that the decision was made after consulting with the Army's top military and civilian leadership and with the backing of President Barack Obama.

Gates, who has described the defense budget as "zero sum," said the cost of the Army increase would be absorbed in funding already allocated in the budget for the next two fiscal years.

"We will take that money from someplace that isn't as high a priority as [adding] more soldiers and taking some additional steps to relieve the stress on the force," he said. "This is a very high priority."

Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, appeared alongside Gates today, and also weighed in on the decision.

"I've grown increasingly concerned over the last year and a half about stress on the force and our ability to meet the demands out there," he said. "This temporary increase helps us address that concern. It will also help us get a better handle on [time at home between deployments] and boost the number of people we can deploy with the capabilities our commanders most need."

MILITARY CONTRACTS July 20, 2009

NAVY
Raytheon Co., Integrated Defense Systems, Tewksbury, Mass., is being awarded a $60,000,000 cost-plus-incentive-fee modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-05-C-5346) to exercise an option for Mission System Equipment (MSE) Class Services for the Zumwalt Class Destroyer Program. Work will be performed in Raytheon facilities (85 percent) in San Diego, Calif.; Marlboro, Mass.; Sudbury, Mass.; Tewksbury, Mass.; Towson, Md.; Portsmouth, R.I.; Lockheed Martin facilities (12 percent) in Moorestown, N.J. and Akron, Ohio; and BAE facility in Minneapolis, Minn. (3 percent), and is expected to be completed by March 2013. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C. is the contracting activity.

Raytheon Co., El Segundo, Calif., is being awarded a $41,756,500 modification to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N00019-06-C-0301) for the procurement of 14 full rate production lot six Swiss Advanced Targeting Forward Looking Infrared (ATFLIR) Pods and associated spares for the Swiss F/A-18 Program under the Foreign Military Sales Program. Work will be performed in McKinney, Texas (80 percent) and El Segundo, Calif. (20 percent), and is expected to be completed in February 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

Raytheon Co., Missile Systems, Tucson, Ariz., is being awarded a $16,788,971 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-07-C-5444) for SeaRAM production requirements - two MK 15 Mod 31 Close-In Weapon System (CIWS) SeaRAM weapon systems, ancillary equipment and reliability spares including associated peculiar support equipment, common support equipment and initial outfitting spares. Work will be performed in Munich, Germany (37 percent); Louisville, Ky. (33 percent); Tucson, Ariz. (8 percent); Andover, Mass. (6 percent); Pittsburgh, Pa. (4 percent); Mechanicsville, Md. (3 percent); Fort Defiance, Ariz. (3 percent); Bloomington, Minn. (2 percent); Santa Clara, Calif. (2 percent); Athens, Greece (2 percent), and is expected to be completed by September 2011. Contract funds in the amount of $9,216,124 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C. is the contracting activity.

Vision Systems International, LLC, San Jose, Calif., is being awarded a $17,285,580 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract to provide Fast Characterization Tool (FACT) hardware, integration, and validation and software upgrades for the F/A-18 Joint Helmet Mounting Cueing System (JHMCS) for the U.S. Navy and the Governments of Australia, Canada, Finland, and Switzerland. Work will be performed in San Jose, Calif., and is expected to be completed in October 2014. Contract funds in the amount of $7,986,000 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. This contract combines purchases for the U.S. Navy ($10,967,580; 58 percent) and the Governments of Australia ($2,808,000; 15 percent); Canada ($1,170,000; 9 percent); Finland ($1,170,000; 9 percent); and Switzerland ($1,170,000; 9 percent) under the Foreign Military Sales Program. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, N.J., is the contracting activity (N68335-09-D-0106).

Compass Systems, Inc.*, Lexington Park, Md., is being awarded a $9,238,868 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract (N00421-07-C-0011) to exercise an option for research and development for various Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance, and Targeting (C4ISR&T) programs, sensors, mission and targeting systems, communication suites, and small aircraft vehicle systems. These efforts are in support of the Roll-On Roll-Off Sensor System for the Contingency Airborne Response (OSSCAR) Program. Work will be performed in Yuma, Ariz. (45 percent), Patuxent River, Md. (30 percent), and Washington, D.C. (25 percent), and is expected to be completed in July 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

Forrester Construction Co., Rockville, Md., is being awarded $9,898,888 for firm-fixed price task order #0011 for renovation of Building 2006 at Marine Corps Base Quantico. The work to be performed provides for the addition to and the repair and rehabilitation of Building 2006 which is a former barracks building constructed in 1931. The building now functions as an office building with a weapons armory in the basement. Work will be performed in Quantico, Va., and is expected to be completed by December 2010. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Six proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Washington, Wash., D.C., is the contracting activity (N62477-04-D-0035).

Advanced Coherent Technologies, LLC*, San Diego, Calif., is being awarded a $7,695,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for a Phase III Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project for Topic N07-019 entitled "Living Marine Resources Imaging Sensor." This contract provides for the continued development of a flight ready prototype sensor integrated to an aircraft, flight test, and sensor performance evaluation. Work will be performed in Mobile, Ala. (60 percent) and San Diego, Calif. (20 percent) and is expected to be completed in July 2014. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured using SBIR Program Solicitation Topic N07-019, with 17 offers received. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, N.J. is the contracting activity (N68335-09-D-0109).

3PSC LLC, Cape Canaveral, Fla., is being awarded a $19,216,896 firm-fixed-price contract for the operation and maintenance of six Military Sealift Command (MSC) oceanographic survey ships worldwide. Six of MSC's seven oceanographic ships are multipurpose and perform acoustic, biological, physical and geophysical surveys, providing much of the U.S. military's information on the ocean environment. These ships use multi-beam, wide-angle, precision sonar systems that make it possible to continuously chart a broad section of ocean floor. The seventh oceanographic survey ship collects data in coastal regions around the world. The data collected helps improve technology in undersea warfare, ship detection and charting the world's coastlines. This contract includes options, including a seventh-vessel option, four one-year options and five six-month award-term options, which if exercised, would bring the cumulative value to $266,532,588. Work will be performed worldwide, and work is expected to be completed Sept. 30, 2010. If all options are exercised, work is expected to be completed in March 2017. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the MSC website, with multiple proposals solicited and five offers received. The U.S. Navy's Military Sealift Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00033-09-C-2504).

DEFENSE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY
Lockheed Martin Corp., Grand Prairie, Texas, is being awarded a $9,997,065 cost plus fixed fee contract for the Long Range Anti-Ship Missile demonstration program. Work will be performed in Grand Prairie, Texas (69 percent); West Palm Beach, Fla. (12 percent); King of Prussia, Pa. (8 percent); Plymouth, Minn. (8 percent); Baltimore, Md. (1 percent); Skokie, Ill. (2 percent), and is expected to be completed in April 2010. Funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. DARPA issued a solicitation in Federal Business Opportunities on June 6, 2008, and nine proposals were received. The contracting activity is DARPA, Arlington, Va. (HR0011-09-C-0097).



DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY
American Apparel, Inc., Selma, Ala. is being awarded a maximum $7,452,480 firm fixed price, indefinite quantity contract for all weather coats. Other location of performance is Centre, Ala. Using service is U.S. Army. The proposal was originally DIBBS solicited with five responses. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is July 19, 2010. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia (DSCP), Philadelphia, Pa. (SPM1C1-09-D-1070).

Coast Produce Co.*, Los Angeles, Calif., is being awarded a maximum $6,905,308 fixed price with economic price adjustment, indefinite quantity, total set aside contract for fresh fruit and vegetables support. There are no other locations of performance. Using services are U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Marine Corps and USDA School customers. The proposal was originally DIBBS solicited with four responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract is exercising first option year period. The date of performance completion is January 31, 2011. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia (DSCP), Philadelphia, Pa. (SPM300-08-D-P021).

Leadership and the Odd Mind

Editor's Note: The author is a former servicemember.

July 20, 2009 (San Dimas, CA) American Heroes Press announced that the co-author of
Leadership: Texas Hold ‘em Style, Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.) will be a guest on the internet-based radio program The Odd Mind with host Lesa Trapp on September 3, 2009.

Date: September 3, 2009
Time: 9PM Central
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/TheOddMind

ABOUT THE PROGRAM
The
Odd Mind Show is the voice of the independent author/artist. The host, Lesa Trapp, is also the publisher of The Odd Mind magazine. In an interview of Trapp by Yvonne Mason, Trapp said of the Odd Mind magazine, “"I want a magazine which not only highlights unknown authors and artists, I also want one which can be purchased and taken into a store to use as a guide to by books." Lesa Trapp went onto explain, “These authors have to rely one their own promoting and their own resources to get their work out there to the readers. Many have spent years trying to not only get published but about as many years getting known.” Summed up, the radio program and the magazine put the extraordinary talents of relatively unknown authors and artists into the minds of new audiences.

ABOUT RAYMOND E. FOSTER
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton. He has completed his doctoral studies in business research. Raymond is a graduate of the West Point Leadership program and has attended law enforcement, technology and leadership programs such as the National Institute for Justice, Technology Institute, Washington, DC.

Raymond has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and is currently a faculty advisor and chair of the
Criminal Justice Program at the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

His first book,
Police Technology is used in over 100 colleges and universities nationwide. He latest book, Leadership: Texas Hold ‘em Style has been adopted by several universities for course work in leadership; by several civil service organizations and required reading for promotion; and, has been well received in the wider market.

ABOUT THE BOOK
Using poker as analogy for
leadership, Captain Andrew Harvey, CPD (ret.), Ed.D. and Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA found the right mix of practical experience and academic credentials to write a definitive book for leaders. Working together, Harvey and Foster have written Leadership: Texas Hold em Style. Most often leaders find they are given a set of resources people, equipment, funds, experience and a mission. As Foster noted, "You're dealt a certain hand. How you play that hand as a leader determines your success."

More than a book: A fun and entertaining journey through
leadership that includes an interactive website to supplement knowledge gained from the book.
Proven and Tested: Not an academic approach to
leadership, but rather a road-tested guide that has been developed through 50-years of author experience.
High Impact: Through the use of perspective, reflection, and knowledge, provides information that turns
leadership potential into leadership practice.
Ease of Application: Theory is reinforced with real-life experience, which results in accessible and practical tools leaders can put to use immediately.
High Road Approach: Personal character and ethical beliefs are woven into each leadership approach, so leaders do the right thing for the right reasons.
Uses Game of Poker: Rather than a dry approach that is all fact and no flavor, the game of poker is used as a lens through which to view
leadership concepts.

CONTACT INFORMATION
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret)
909.599.7530
raymond@hitechcj.com
www.police-writers.com