Military News

Thursday, April 10, 2008

Keating: Engagement With China May Clarify Its Military Intentions

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

April 10, 2008 - China's
military expansion raises questions and concerns, so the best way to get a clear sense of what China is up to and why is to engage with its leaders, the commander of U.S. Pacific Command said here today. Navy Adm. Timothy J. Keating said in response to a reporter's question that he asked about China's activities during both trips he's made there since taking command of PaCom last year.

"We have expressed to them our concern for their development of certain kinds of weapons: aerial-denial weapons and satellite
technology and the growth of their submarine force, for example," he said. "They counter by telling us they only want to protect those things that are theirs."

That's fair, Keating conceded, but it doesn't fully explain the rationale behind China's actions.

"We at Pacific Command seek not just transparency, but clearer intention, expressed by our Chinese colleagues," he said. "And it is our firm desire and intention to continue the dialog with our Chinese colleagues so as to develop an even better understanding of their intention."

Keating cited an apparent disconnect between what China says and what it is doing.

"They profess to seek a peaceful rise and harmonious integration," he said, quoting Chinese
leaders' own words. "We are all for that. But they have to show us, in our view, how they intend to achieve that while developing these certain weapons. We think there is some contradiction in the stated goals vs. the practices we are observing."

Ignoring China or the People's Liberation
Army isn't the answer, he said. "We don't want to fence them off. We don't want to isolate them into a corner," he said. "We are happy to try to work with them."

Keating expressed hope that by engaging with China, including offering its
leaders an opportunity to observe multilateral exercises, the United States and its partners might get the Chinese to open up.

"It is our clear purpose to draw them out, to engage with them, ... so as to ensure they are aware of what it is we are about," he said. Keating emphasized that "we" refers not just to the United States, but also to the entire Asia-Pacific region.

This engagement, he said, might give the Chinese the opportunity "to prove what they profess to believe" and help reduce concerns throughout the region about its
military programs.

Services See Strong Showing for March Recruiting

American Forces Press Service

April 10, 2008 - All
military services met or exceeded their recruiting goals for March, Defense Department officials reported today. This makes the 10th straight month the services have hit their recruiting marks. All of the services have surpassed their recruiting goals for fiscal 2008 to date.

The
Army brought in 101 percent of its 6,000-recruit goal for March, and the Marines finished with a two-month streak of 137 percent of its 1,632-recruit goal. The two services recruited 6,066 and 2,234 new members, respectively.

The
Air Force and Navy both hit 100 percent of their respective goals of 2,093 and 2,909 recruits.

In the reserve components, the
Army Reserve and Air National Guard topped recruiting efforts, with both hitting 121 percent of their goals. The Army Reserve recruited 4,304 soldiers, and the Air National Guard brought in 946 airmen. The Army National Guard and the Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force reserves all made 100 percent of their recruiting goals for the month. Their numbers were 6,048 for the Army National Guard; 865 for the Navy Reserve; 553 for the Marine Corps Reserve; and 720 for the Air Force Reserve.

In active-duty retention, the
Army and Marine Corps continued with strong showings this month, both exceeding their year-to-date goals.

Gates Tests Phone Connection with China

By Fred W. Baker III
American Forces Press Service

April 10, 2008 - Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates tested a defense telephone link to China for the first time, making a call to his counterpart there this morning. Gates talked "briefly" to the Chinese Minister of National Defense Gen. Liang Guanglie, Bryan Whitman, a Pentagon spokesman, said.

During the conversation, Gates congratulated Liang on his recent promotion to minister of national defense and welcomed "this important step in enhancing communications between our militaries," Whitman said.

Gates and Liang also discussed increasing
military-to-military relations and emphasized how "substantive dialogue" can avoid any miscalculations on the part of the two countries.

Liang expressed appreciation for aid provided by the United States during a severe winter storm suffered by China earlier this year, Whitman said.

"It demonstrates [that] overall the U.S.-China defense relationship continues to improve," he said.

The two countries agreed to the link last year. The United States has more than 40 such links with other countries.

MILITARY CONTRACTS April 10, 2008

NAVY

The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company, Raleigh, N.C., is being awarded a $35,631,000 firm-fixed-price contract for design and construction of an aircraft maintenance hangar, phases I and II, at
Marine Corps Air Station New River, Camp Lejeune. The work to be performed provides for construction of a multi-story aircraft maintenance hangar to provide hangar bay, shop space, flight line operations, and maintenance functions in support of the V-22 aircraft squadrons. Work also includes mechanical, electrical support systems and telephone system. Built-in equipment includes a freight elevator and five ton bridge crane. Site improvements include parking and landscaping and incidental related work. Work will be performed in Jacksonville, N.C., and work is expected to be completed by May 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Naval Facilities Engineering Command e-solicitation website with four proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (N40085-08-C-1419).

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Bethpage, N.Y., is being awarded an $11,738,328 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-award-fee contract (N00019-03-C-0057) for non-recurring efforts for the E-2D halon system replacement in support of the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye System Development and Demonstration Program. Work will be performed in Bethpage, N.Y., (87.3 percent) and St. Augustine, Fla., (12.7 percent) and is expected to be completed in Sep. 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

Lockheed Martin Services Inc., Cherry Hill, N.J., is being awarded a $9,862,594 cost-plus- fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for security cooperation,
security assistance and foreign military sales technical and program/project management support services to Naval Inventory Control Point (NAVICP) OF and applicable customers of NAVICP. This contract contains three one-year option periods which, if exercised, will bring the total estimated value of the contract to $47,538,817. Work will be performed in Philadelphia, Pa., (70 percent) and Washington, D.C., (30 percent), and work is expected to be completed by Mar. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was awarded competitively through full and open competition, with one offer received. The Fleet and Industrial Supply Center Norfolk, Contracting Department Philadelphia Division, is the contracting activity (N00189-08-D-Z029). This contract was previously announced on Mar. 19, 2008, as contract number N00189-08-D-Z025.

Harris Corp., Melbourne, Fla., is being awarded a $9,174,475 modification to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N00019-05-C-0044) to exercise an option for the procurement of 133
Tactical Aircraft Moving Map Capability (TAMMAC) Digital Map Computer (DMC); 66 TAMMAC Digital Video Map Computer (DVMC); and 251 TAMMAC DMC Extension Housings for U.S. Navy use in F/A-18C/D/E/F, EA-18G, AV-8B, UH-1Y/ AH-1Z aircraft. In addition, this contract provides for the procurement of 12 TAMMAC DVMC and 12 TAMMAC DMC Extension Housings for the Government of Australia. Work will be performed in Malabar, Fla., (80 percent) and Palm Bay, Fla., (20 percent), and is expected to be completed in Mar. 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract combines purchases for the U.S. Navy ($8,452,663; 92 percent); and the Government of Australia ($721,812; 7 percent) under the Foreign Military Sales Program. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

RJC Architects*, San Diego, Calif., is being awarded a maximum $7,500,000 (base and options - with a guaranteed minimum of $5,000) firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity architect/engineering contract for renovation/repair and new construction of facilities in the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southwest area of responsibility (AOR). The work to be performed provides for engineering studies and site
investigation reports to support new development on raw land, or re-development of existing developed sites; preparation of Requests for Proposals for design-build projects; preparation of fully designed plans and specifications for Invitation for Bid projects; other engineering designs, studies, reports, cost estimates, evaluations, and construction support services. Work will be performed at various Navy and Marine Corps facilities and other government facilities within the NAVFAC Southwest AOR including, but not limited, to Calif., (87 percent); Ariz., (5 percent); Nev., (5 percent); Colo., (1 percent); N.M., (1 percent) and Utah (1 percent), and work is expected to be completed Apr. 2009 (April 2013 with options exercised). Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Naval Facilities Engineering Command e-solicitation website with 20 proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity (N62473-08-D-8624).

Windermere Information
Technology Systems, Annapolis, Md., is being awarded a $5,622,481 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee performance-based contract to continue the government's operational requirement to develop miniaturized hardware packaging components, equipment camouflaging components, and a miniaturized un-attended Direction-Finding (DF) sensor module. This is in support of the time-critical technical requirements for both the Joint Threat Warning System (JTWS) Team Transportable (TT) and Ground Signal Kit (GSK) systems, and an innovative power source capability that can satisfy the power source requirements for the JTWS TT, GSK II, and other United States Special Operations Command tactical force protection system power requirements. The contract includes four one-year option periods, which, if exercised, will bring the total cumulative value of the contract to the estimated amount of $29,517,858. Work will be performed in Annapolis, Md., and work is expected to be completed by Apr. 2009 (Apr. 2013 with exercised options). Contract funds will not expire at the end of the fiscal year. This contract was sole source procured under other than full and open competition. The effort was synopsized in Federal Business Opportunities website in accordance with the provisions of FAR Part 5, indicating the Government's intent to award a sole source action. The Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, Charleston, S.C., is the contracting activity (N65236-08-D-6807).

ARMY

Battelle Memorial Institute,
Columbus, Ohio, was awarded on Apr. 8, 2008, a modification to increase the total mount of their existing contract by $78,500,000 to a total of $177,548,330 for a cost-reimbursable contract for the Scientific Services Program to provide scientific, technical and advisory services for problems related to research and development projects within the government. Work location will be determined with each task order, and is expected to be completed by Apr. 10, 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. U.S. Army Research Development Engineering Command, Durham, N.C., is the contracting activity (W911NF-07-D-0001).

John. C. Gremberg Co., Inc, Rockville, Md., was awarded on Apr. 8, 2008, a $27,066,325 firm-fixed price contract for construction of a new three level steel and concrete steam sterilization plan that will have the capacity to decontaminate 126,000 gallons per-day of liquid bio-waste. Work will be performed at Fort Detrick, Md., and is expected to be completed by Apr. 30, 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore Md., is the contracting activity (W912DR-08-C-0016).

CCI, Inc., Anchorage, Ala., was awarded on Apr. 8, 2008, a 13,078,378 firm-fixed price contract for repair of airfield pavements at Bangor Air National Guard Base. Work will be performed in
Bangor, Maine, and is expected to be completed by Nov. 12, 2008. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. United States Property & Fiscal Office for Maine, National Guard Bureau is the contracting activity (W912JD-08-C-0001).

AIR FORCE

Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc. of Herndon, Va., is being awarded a modified contract for $27,970,673. The action will provide survivability and vulnerability technical research and development analysis for U.S.
Coast Guard ship, aviation, and Command and Control, Communications, Computer, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems. At this time $7,714,009 has been obligated. Offutt AFB, Neb., is the contracting activity (SP0700-03-D-1380, Delivery Order: 0250).

Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc., of Herndon, Va., is being awarded a cost plus fixed fee contract for $8,661,265. The contract action will provide information assurance analysis for Naval Weapons Center, Weapons Division-Weapons Engagement Office Development Command and Control
Technology. At this time $ 96,618 has been obligated. Offutt AFB, Neb., is the contracting activity (SPO700-98-D-4002, DO 0336).

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

Ansul, Inc., Marinette, Wis. is being awarded a maximum $6,488,858 fixed-price with economic price adjustment, indefinite-delivery and indefinite-quantity contract for Aqueous Film Forming Foam. There are no other locations of performance. Using services are
Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. This proposal was originally Web solicited with 3 responses.

Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Date of performance completion is Apr. 9, 2010. The contracting activity is Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa. (SPM8EH-08-D-0251).

Face of Defense: Sergeant Donates Hair to Help Children

By Air Force Tech. Sgt. James Law
Special to American Forces Press Service

April 9, 2008 - An
Air Force noncommissioned officer who had long hair all of her life decided during her deployment here to let her hair brighten some lives. Staff Sgt. Jenet Akerson, a 451st Expeditionary Communications Flight Network Control Center technician, donated 13 inches of her hair to "Locks of Love," a nonprofit organization that provides hairpieces to financially disadvantaged children with long-term medical hair loss.

"I never had short hair," she said. "I was raised in Hawaii; my mom has long hair, so it's part of my heritage."

Akerson said the decision was difficult, but that it was influenced by her admiration for her mother-in-law's experience with alopecia, a condition of patchy hair loss, most noticeably on the scalp.

"I never would have even thought to do something like that had it not been for her being an influence in my life," Akerson said. "She has a heart of gold and is the strongest woman I know, so really it was a dedication to her."

She explained she wanted to be with her mother-in-law when she cut her hair, but decided to cut it while deployed because she wanted to donate healthy hair, and the water here was damaging hers.

Although she was unable to be with her mother-in-law at the time, her husband was deployed with her and cut her hair.

"It meant a lot to be a part of it and to actually be the one to cut her hair," said
Air Force Staff Sgt. Jeremy Akerson, a 451th Expeditionary Communications Flight planner.

His wife said it's taking a while to learn how to work with short hair, but that it's something she will get used to.

"We've decided that, as long as my hair grows healthy, as soon as it gets up to a decent length, we're going to cut it off every year," she said. "I don't color my hair, so I guess they will have some white streaks in it when I get older."

Her husband explained it was coincidence and luck they were both deployed at the same time to the same location, especially since they had not been stationed together since December 2006. The couple met in May 2005 at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, where they were stationed together. They were married in September 2007, nine months after he was reassigned to Sheppard
Air Force Base, Texas.

The couple hopes to be reunited on a joint assignment in March 2009 after Jenet Akerson meets the time-on-station requirement for reassignment.

(
Air Force Tech. Sgt. James Law serves with 455th Air Expeditionary Wing Public Affairs.)

Keating Visit to Brunei Reaffirms U.S. Commitment to Pacific Region

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

April 9, 2008 - The top U.S. officer in the Pacific today called Brunei's efforts to expand its
military capabilities and regional engagement a big step toward frustrating terrorist ambitions and fostering stability. Navy Adm. Timothy J. Keating today paid his first visit here as commander of U.S. Pacific Command, telling the country's leaders their increased regional military engagement promises greater long-term security.

Keating met with the sultan of Brunei, Crown Prince Haji al-Muhtadee Billah; Defense Chief Maj. Gen. Halbi Yussof; and other senior government and
military officials during a whirlwind day of sessions. As he traveled between visits, construction at the new defense ministry to open later this year and at Muara Naval Base provided tangible evidence of efforts to build Brunei's military forces' capabilities.

The country's Defense White Paper 2007 document, which lays out a framework for that process spanning the next three to five years, reflects those changes. The plan seeks to create a stronger, more agile force, while boosting joint and multilateral cooperation.

Keating praised the plan, Brunei's equivalent of the U.S. Defense Department's Quadrennial Defense Review, as a visionary tool for the future.

"It's an impressive piece of work," he told defense leaders who briefed him about the plan, and cited its realistic near-, mid- and long-term goals to confront challenges facing the region.

Of these threats, including transnational
crime, piracy and smuggling, Keating pointed to violent extremism as the most pressing. He emphasized the need for more sharing of information and intelligence among the United States, Brunei and its neighbors to make it more difficult for violent extremists to move around the region, transfer money, or garner financial or moral support.

Keating noted that the region has felt the sting of
terrorism, most notably during deadly bombing attacks in Bali, Indonesia, in which hundreds of people were killed or injured. Improved cooperation that reduces violent extremists' ability to operate here can help prevent a repeat, he said.

The admiral promised U.S. help, if needed, for Brunei to achieve goals outlined in the White Paper, noting the effort would benefit both Brunei and the entire region.

Throughout his visit, Keating pointed to the importance of enhanced
military-to-military engagement -- military exchanges, port visits and training exercises, for example -- in promoting the two countries' security relationship.

U.S. and Bruneian forces will join together in August for the annual Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training, or CARAT, exercise. Another exercise, SEACAT, or South East Asia Combined Afloat Training, will follow later that month.

This year's CARAT exercise will expand beyond its traditional maritime
security scope to include humanitarian assistance and disaster-response planning and cooperation. The devastating December 2004 tsunami that slammed the region, and more recently, severe flooding in Brunei in February, underscored the key role military forces can play during these crises.

Keating called CARAT instrumental to the theater
security cooperation plan, improving the U.S. and Bruneian militaries' ability to operate together and learn from each other, while promoting understanding.

Personal interactions -- not just like today's meetings of top government and military
leaders, but also among servicemembers participating in military-to-military engagements -- reinforce the common values the citizens of the two countries share, Keating said. Ultimately, he added, they all want similar things.

"They want peace; they want stability; they want a better life for their kids and their grandkids," he said. Visits like today's help advance those common goals, he said.

"We have a better understanding of our common interests. We have a better understanding of our common goals. We have a better understanding of the capabilities and capacity we each have," the admiral said. "And we will work more closely as a result of this visit, I'm convinced."

Keating said he welcomes the opportunity to reaffirm to Brunei's
leaders the continued U.S. commitment. The U.S. military has been in the Pacific for decades, "and we're not going anywhere," he said he reassured the Bruneians. "We represent 350,000 men and women in uniform in United States Pacific Command, and we want Brunei to understand we are committed to the same overarching desire for peace and stability that they are," he said.

As Brunei bolsters its partnership with the United States, it's also increasing its engagement with its neighbors.

Brunei recently sent observers to Khaan Quest 2007, a PaCom-Mongolia peacekeeping exercise, and dispatched a platoon of peacekeepers to Bangladesh as part of the Shanti-Doot Global Peace Operations Initiative. Brunei also works closely with Singapore, which runs a jungle warfare school here for both countries' land forces.

Keating applauded these efforts and said PaCom will continue to look for opportunities to increase its engagement with Brunei as it supports more multilateral initiatives.

These efforts foster the trust, confidence and understanding required for them to work cooperatively -- whether toward stability and security, providing humanitarian assistance, or fighting and winning a conflict, if confronted with one, he said.

"None of us can be everywhere, all the time," Keating said. "We have to be able to work together to support our common interests and the goal of peace and
security in the region."

Army to Relax Information Controls to Keep Pace with Cyberspace

By Kristen Noel
Special to American Forces Press Service

April 9, 2008 - Cumbersome controls over information flow in the
Army soon may be a thing of the past, as the service works to deliver its messages proactively in the fast-paced cyber world. Instead of worrying about controlling what soldiers are saying, the Army needs to focus on rapidly getting their messages out into cyberspace, Army Col. Wayne Parks, director of computer network operations and electronic warfare at the Combined Arms Center in Fort Leavenworth, Kan., said in a teleconference with online journalists and "bloggers" yesterday.

In today's electronic-warfare environment, Parks said, the
Army needs to be able "to get the message out either before the enemy gets the message out, or be able to respond to the enemy as they're putting the message out."

The Army has a tendency to be reactive, he said, but the service now is looking at how it engages people with information differently from in the past.

Parks explained that, rather than trying to control what soldiers say, the
Army is focusing on keeping the force informed with the facts. "We're just looking to inform our folks well enough that when they say something, ... they're going to state the facts," he said.

He estimated that 80 percent of the time the information soldiers provide directly is correct. So, the 20 percent risk of inaccuracies is worthwhile to maintain a proactive approach to online messaging, he said.

"As long as you're aware of what's being said, you can always correct the record," Parks said, "or you can always inform people adequately to ensure that we ... don't stay on this reactive mode and don't look at our soldiers and our leaders out there and mistrust them."

Parks also said defending against
cyber attacks on computer networks and systems is another key element of electronic warfare.

"There are attacks being made on our networks and our
computer systems -- whether it be hardware or software -- from across the globe," he said.

The Combined Arms Center is studying lessons learned from past attacks and is building new capabilities to defend against future attacks, Parks said.

(Kristen Noel works for the New Media branch of the American Forces Information Service.)

MILITARY CONTRACTS April 9, 2008

AIR FORCE

Boeing Co., of
Anaheim, Calif., is being awarded a modified contract for $24,960,000. This undefinitized contract action will incorporate Engineering Change Proposal (ECP) 0035, Strategic Networks, into the Family of Advanced Beyond-Line-of-Sight Terminals (FAB-T) Increment 1 program. At this time $9,250,000 has been obligated. Hanscom AFB, Mass., is the contracting activity (F19628-02-C-0048/P00141).

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Integrated System Sector, of
El Segundo, Calif., is being awarded a modified contract for $22,300,005. This action will provide T38, 33 wing assemblies and gear boxes, 15 each. At this time $22,300,005 has been obligated. Hill AFB, Utah, is the contracting activity (FA8218-07-C-0009-P00003).

General Electric Co., Aircraft Engines of
Cincinnati, Ohio, is being awarded a modified firm-fixed price contract for $7,751,279. This contract modification will provide nozzle flaps, 3212 units for Air Force Requirements and 250 units for foreign military sales requirements applicable to F110 Engine in the F-16 Aircraft. At this time $7,751,279 has been obligated. Tinker AFB, Okla., is the contracting activity (FA8104-05-G-0003-0158).

Honeywell International Incorporated of Clearwater, Fla., is being awarded a modified contract for $7,598,610. This action will provide research and development under Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) VS-05-01, exercise option five, Strategic Resonating Beam Accelero-meter (SRBA Stage 3)" for the Advanced Ballistic Missile Technologies Program. At this time $735,000 has been obligated. Kirtland AFB, N.M., is the contracting activity (FA9453-05-C-0241 P00019).

ARMY

Bertucci Industrial Services, LLC,
Kenner, La., was awarded on Apr. 8, 2008, a $12,497,052 firm-fixed price contract for the Grand Isle and vicinity hurricane protection project, rehabilitation of Hurricane Katrina damage. Work will be performed in Grand Isle/Jefferson Parish, La., and is expected to be completed by Jan. 2, 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Web bids were solicited on Feb. 21, 2008, and one bid was received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans, La., is the contracting activity (W912P8-08-C-0045).

Raytheon, Netcentric Systems, Fort Wayne, Ind., was awarded on Apr. 7, 2008, a $12,160,993 firm-fixed price contract for development of advanced field artillery tactical data system, versions 3 and 3+. Work will be performed in Fort Wayne, Ind., and is expected to be completed by Dec. 31, 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. One bid was solicited on Sep. 7, 2007. CECOM Acquisition Center, Fort Monmouth, N.J., is the contracting activity (DAAB07-99-C-E003).

MaxFour-Weitz JV, Englewood, Colo., was awarded on Apr. 8, 2008, a $6,586,176 firm-fixed price contract for the construction of a child development center. Work will be performed at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., and is expected to be completed by Sep. 16, 2014. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Four bids were solicited on Feb. 13, 2008, and two bids were received. Corps of Engineers,
Kansas City, Mo., Is the contracting activity (W912DQ-07-D-0031).

BAE Systems, York, Pa., was awarded on Apr. 7, 2008, a $6,300,000 firm-fixed price contract for
fire suppression modification kits. Work will be performed in York, Pa., and is expected to be completed by Sep. 30, 2008. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. One bid was solicited on Mar. 17, 2008. U.S. Army TACOM, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-05-G-0005).

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

Outdoor Venture Corp., Stearns, Ky.*, is being awarded a maximum $35,816,675.00 fixed price with economic price adjustment, indefinite delivery contract for tent equipment. There are no other locations of performance. Using services are
Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. This proposal was originally Web solicited with four responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Date of performance completion is Dec. 15, 2009. The contracting activity is Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM1C1-08-D-1061).

Shamrock Foods Co., Commerce City, Colo., is being awarded a maximum $7,660,000 firm fixed price, indefinite quantity contract for full line food distribution. Other locations of service are Albuquerque, New Mexico. Using services are
Army, Air Force and Marine Corps. There were six proposals originally solicited withsix responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Date of performance completion is Apr. 11, 2009. The contracting activity is Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa. (SPM300-08-D-3220).

NAVY

Solpac Construction, dba Soltek Pacific Inc., San Diego, Calif., is being awarded $6,126,200 for firm-fixed-price Task Order #0002 under a previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple award construction contract (N62473-08-D-8609) for construction of a physical fitness center at area 33,
Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton. The work to be performed provides for a new single-story physical fitness center that will include racquetball and basketball courts, telescoping bleachers, aerobics, weight and cardiovascular training areas, restrooms, lockers, showers, saunas, laundry and administrative support areas, and will include all services, labor, materials and equipment necessary to complete the work as described in the request for proposal.

Work will be performed in
Oceanside, Calif., and work is expected to be completed by Jun. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Five proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity.

National Security Archive Update, April 9, 2008

FIGHTING THE WAR IN SOUTHEAST ASIA, 1961-1973

Air Force Histories Reveal CIA Role in Laos, CIA Air Strike Missions, New Evidence on Nuclear Weapons, Air Force Policy Disputes, During Vietnam War Years

http://www.nsarchive.org

April 9, 2008 - Previously secret U.S.
Air Force official histories of the Vietnam war published today by the National Security Archive disclose for the first time that Central Intelligence Agency contract employees had a direct role in combat air attacks when they flew Laotian government aircraft on strike missions and that the Air Force actively considered nuclear weapons options during the 1959 Laos crisis. Today's posting also includes analysis and commentary by noted Vietnam scholar and Archive senior fellow John Prados.

The newly declassified histories, which were released through Freedom of Information Act litigation by the National
Security Archive with the law firm James & Hoffman, include the Air Force's detailed official history of the war in northern Laos, written during the 1990s but hidden in classified form for years. Also declassified were Air Force historical studies on specific years of the Vietnam War, documenting in great detail the Air Force's role in planning and implementing the air war in North and South Vietnam.

Among other significant disclosures in these histories are:

Air Force interest in nuclear options during at least two flash points in the Southeast Asian conflict: Laos in 1959 and in 1968 during the battle of Khe Sanh.

CIA operational commitments for the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion hampered the Agency's ability to carry out Kennedy administration policy in Laos.

CIA proprietary Air America directed search and rescue missions in Laos in addition to its role in combat operations.

The U.S. ambassador in Laos served as the field commander of the so-called "secret war" there, a role that has been largely undocumented.

This briefing book was made possible through a lawsuit brought in March 2005 by the National
Security Archive after it discovered through its Freedom of Information Act audits that the Air Force had a pattern and practice of mishandling FOIA requests, including failing to process requests, destroying records, discouraging requesters, and excessive delays.

The Washington, D.C., law firm James & Hoffman successfully argued the case before federal Judge Rosemary Collyer, who in April 2006 granted partial summary judgment to the Archive. She found that "the
Air Force has indeed failed miserably to handle Archive FOIA requests in a timely manner." The court ordered the Air Force to resolve the Archive's requests--some pending as long as 18 years--as expeditiously as possible. The requests for the Laos history and the Vietnam War studies were originally filed in 1988 and 1990; the Air Force finally processed them pursuant to the court's order and released more than 500 pages of previously-classified histories.

THE NATIONAL
SECURITY ARCHIVE is an independent non-governmental research institute and library located at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. The Archive collects and publishes declassified documents acquired through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). A tax-exempt public charity, the Archive receives no U.S. government funding; its budget is supported by publication royalties and donations from foundations and individuals.

Williams, Hatley and Capwell

Editor's Note: One of the authors is a former servicemember.

April 8, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three
law enforcement officials.

Howard Williams began his 30 year law enforcement career as a cadet for the Austin Police Department (Texas). Working a variety of assignments he rose through the ranks of the department to become the commander of the Organized Crime Division in 2002. In 2003, Howard Williams accept the position as Chief of Police for the San Marcos Police Department (Texas).

Howard Williams completed his Master’s Degree in Criminal Justice from Southwest Texas State University in August 2002 and a Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences in August 2000. Howard Williams is the author of Asset Forfeiture: A Law Enforcement Perspective.

According to the book description of Asset Forfeiture: A
Law Enforcement Perspective, it “reviews the myriad statutes, rules, regulations, confusing and often contradictory judicial decisions, and detailed processes to outline forfeiture procedures for law enforcement administrators, investigators, and officers. The text consists of three principal sections: the development of modern asset forfeiture policy, asset forfeiture law, and administering forfeiture programs.”

Allen Hatley was a freelance writer and twice elected constable in Bandera County (Texas). Allen Hatley served in the US Army and saw service in Korea from 1951 to 1952. He holds a BS and MS in Geology and an Advanced Peace Officer Certification from the State of Texas. In addition to his 30 year career in the petroleum industry, Allen Hatley has an active and varied law enforcement career.

In 1988, he graduated from the Middle Rio Grande
Law Enforcement Academy and received his Basic Peace Officer Certificate. He worked as a criminal investigator for the district attorney’s office and as a narcotics agent in the Southwest Narcotics Task Force. In 1993, he was elected as Constable, Precinct Number 4, Bandera County and re-elected in 1997. He retired in 1998. Allen Hatley is the author of Bringing the Law to Texas: Crime and Violence in Nineteenth Century Texas; The Oil Finders: A Collection of Stories About Exploration; Early Texas Indian Wars 1822-1835; The First Texas Legion During the American Civil War; The Indian Wars in Stephen F. Austin's Texas Colony, 1822-1835; Reluctant Rebels: The Eleventh Texas Cavalry Regiment; The First Texas Legion; and, Texas Constables: A Frontier Heritage.

According to the book description of Texas Constables: A Frontier Heritage, “Though a host of Texas Rangers, U.S. marshals, and even town marshals populate the legends and annals of law enforcement, the stories and exploits of constables, an equally significant group of peace officers, have gone mostly unheralded. In a long-overdue examination,
Allen Hatley traces Texas constables to their roots in medieval England and colonial America and chronicles a rich history from January 1823, when a constable was appointed as the first law-enforcement officer in Stephen F. Austin's colony.”

Allen Capwell is the former sheriff of the Wyoming County (New York). Allen L. Capwell is the author of The Sheriff of Wyoming County: 150 Years of Protection and Service.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 951 police officers (representing 400 police departments) and their 2024 police books in 34 categories, there are also listings of United States federal
law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

America Supports You: Group Rides to Support Wounded Vets

By Samantha L. Quigley
American Forces Press Service

April 9, 2008 - Wounded veterans recovering in some California Veterans Affairs facilities hear some of their visitors long before they see them. Blue Star Riders is a group of motorcycle enthusiasts who visit with veterans recovering at the
Palo Alto, Livermore, Martinez and San Francisco Veterans Affairs facilities at least once a month, said Richard Hamilton, the group's founder and president.

"(Blue Star Riders) are dedicated to supporting our troops and veterans, as well as honoring all wounded troops and fallen heroes," said Hamilton, a former
Marine and Vietnam veteran.

Members of the group visit with as many veterans as possible during each of their visits. "If there is family present, we ... ascertain whether there is anything they need," he said.

Often, when veterans move to California from
military medical facilities on the East Coast, their families have used up many of their resources or are unable to get around, Hamilton explained. Blue Star Riders help in any way they can, including providing transportation, he said.

The group also sends requested items to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, in Germany.

Blue Star Riders is a new supporter of America Supports You, a Defense Department program connecting citizens and companies with servicemembers and their families serving at home and abroad.

The group hopes its affiliation with America Supports You will increase awareness that hospitalized veterans would enjoy having visitors, Hamilton said, and that the affiliation will "bring a focus on the families of our wounded active
military and their sacrifices while attending to their loved ones, and their need for support."