Military News

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

Progress Made in Southcom Region, Challenges Remain, Admiral Says

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

March 17, 2009 - The top U.S. military officer for Latin America and the Caribbean today reported positive developments in the region over the past year, from increased military-to-military cooperation to progress in confronting drug-related terrorism to a dramatic hostage rescue by the Colombian military. Navy Adm. James G. Stavridis told the Senate Armed Services Committee he's confident these trends will continue in 2009, with new milestones to be reached in strengthening security cooperation with partner nations.

Stavridis cited major accomplishments during 2008, including the safe return and repatriation of three U.S. defense contractors held hostage for five and a half years in Colombia by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.

The Colombian military executed a "very daring, audacious raid" that Stavridis called "a real example of the success in five and a half years of building partnership capacity."

"So I think Colombia is on the right track," he told the senators.

Meanwhile, Stavridis pointed to a "robust year" of military-to-military exercises that he said are building capacity within regional militaries and the cooperation needed to deal with cross-border threats. For example, this year's Panamax exercise, with 22 countries involved, constituted the world's largest military training exercise in terms of participation.

Other exercises that focus on everything from special operations to disaster relief are growing in scale, too, increasing capability in the region. Stavridis called this "very robust schedule of mil-to-mil contacts ... a big part of what we need to do in this region to maintain this positive military-to-military connection wherever we can."

One of Southcom's most gratifying missions last year, Continuing Promise, dispatched the USS Kearsarge and USS Boxer to the region to provide medical assistance. As the teams conducted 200,000 patient treatments ashore, they demonstrated U.S. compassion and competence, Stavridis said.

The mission is "a way we can connect with this region" while at the same time providing "great training" to U.S. forces, he said.

While emphasizing strides made, Stavridis cited the problem of the narcotics flow through the region, and the increased use of semi-submersible watercraft to transport them.

"Last year we were able to stop 230 tons of cocaine," he said, but he emphasized that the challenge is not just on the supply side, but also on the demand side in the United States. Working together with partners in Mexico and Central America, with the help of tracking and interception equipment and training provided through the U.S. Merida Initiative, is an important step in addressing this problem, he said.

Southcom is working to foil the proliferation of semi-submersibles -- submarine-like watercraft built in the Andean Ridge jungles that are difficult to track as they transport as much as 7 tons of cocaine -- the admiral told the committee. "We're focusing a lot of resources on interdicting those, and working with our partners to do so," he said.

Stavridis reminded the committee of the importance of Latin America and the Caribbean to U.S. security and U.S. interests.

"What happens south of us will influence what happens here in our own nation," he said.

Tankers Top Shopping List, Transportation Commander Says

By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service

March 17, 2009 - Acquiring a new fleet of Air Force tankers, known as KC-X until an airframe is chosen, is imperative, the commander of U.S. Transportation Command told the Senate Armed Services Committee today. "My top priority remains the recapitalization of our aging tanker fleet," Air Force Gen. Duncan J. McNabb told the senators. "The KC-X will be a game-changer."

The aircraft, designed to be a refueler with cargo-carrying capability, will revolutionize the mobility world the same way the C-17 did for in-theater and strategic airlift, the general said.

"It will be the ultimate mobility force multiplier," he said.

The Air Force selected Northrop Grumman/EADS for the tanker project last year, but rival bidder Boeing protested the decision. Bidding was reopened after a Government Accountability Office found flaws with the process.

McNabb also gave the senators an overview of Transcom's responsibilities and operations. All told, he said, Transcom aircrews fly 900 sorties per day.

"That's a takeoff and landing every 90 seconds – sometimes in the most austere areas like Antarctica, sometimes in the most dangerous, like a forward operating base in Afghanistan," he said.

McNabb also spoke about the newly developed supply routes open to Afghanistan via the northern distribution network. The supply network uses commercial rail and boat to ship nonlethal cargo to coalition forces operating in Afghanistan. The command ships food, fuel, building materials and other supplies from Europe and Central Asia.

But as important as equipment is to the command, McNabb said, it is Transcom's 136,000 men and women, civilian and military, private and public, who are the true treasures to the nation. Success, he said, is due to the dedicated logistics professionals finding new ways to ensure warfighters have what they need.

Transcom logisticians work long hours, often in dangerous conditions, McNabb said. Aircrews fly night-vision approaches to unimproved airfields or airdrop supplies to troops in Afghanistan. Air refuelers deliver 5 million pounds of fuel "flying every day and night, in the weather, extending the reach of our joint force and coalition partners," he said.

On the sea, merchant mariners and military and civilian port operators load and operate 35 ships every day in support of warfighters. Terminal operators move thousands of containers, domestic freight and rail shipments throughout the world.

The command also provides contingency response groups and port-opening experts "to open up the flow in contingency or disaster relief operations in support of the warfighting commander," the general said. Transcom also provides medical crews and critical care teams that tend to wounded warriors and quickly transport them from the battlefield to world class care.

The command could not accomplish its mission without commercial airlift and sealift partners opening new avenues of supply into Afghanistan or supporting the nation in times of surge, McNabb said.

"The logistics team is responsible for giving the United States unrivalled global reach," the general said. "We are committed to serving our nation's warfighters by delivering the right stuff to the right place at the right time. Whether sustaining the fight, providing disaster relief or moving six brigades simultaneously, we are there."

McNabb thanked the senators for providing the command with the equipment needed to maintain the logistics carriers. He pointed to the large medium speed, roll-on, roll-off ships and upgrades to the ready reserve fleet that were key to the command's success over the past seven years. "The new joint high-speed vessels will give us even greater flexibility," he said.

He also praised the performance of the C-130J and C-17 airlifters. The airframes "have come of age since 9/11 and have allowed us to change how we support the combatant commanders by air," he said. "The current C-5, C-130 and KC-10 modernization programs will make an enormous difference in our capability and reliability."

U.S. Africom Promotes Stability, Security on Continent

By John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service

March 17, 2009 - The nascent U.S. Africa Command is promoting stability and security on the continent through military-to-military activities and a host of other programs, the Africom commander said today. Army Gen. William E. "Kip" Ward spoke about the Africom mission at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing.

"We work in concert with other U.S. government agencies and international partners to ensure that our activities are harmonized," he told the Senate panel. "Our strategy is based on military-to-military efforts to enhance the security capacity and capability of our African partners."

In his dealings with African leaders, Ward said, he receives one common message. "The consistent message they give me is for their intent for their nations to provide for their own security," he said.

Ward said most heads of African states welcome Africom's assistance in reaching their goals for establishing legitimate and professional security forces. Further, he said, most perform operations with integrity and are increasingly able to support the mission in support of international peace.

The U.S. mission in Africa has assumed an interagency approach that combines efforts by the American military and the State Department and the U.S. Agency for International Development, as well as the departments of Treasury, Commerce, Homeland Security, Agriculture and other agencies doing work on the continent, he said.

"Similarly, we reach out to international partners, including Europeans, international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, private enterprises and academia," he said. "Their perspectives on the situation in Africa are valuable."

Currently, Africom – which officially stood up Oct. 1 -- is engaged in military training, education, sustainment operations, and provides logistics support. One activity of note is the International Military Education and Training program, or IMET.

IMET is a State Department-led foreign-assistance program that provides education and training for foreign military and civilian personnel and is critical to building long-term relationships, according to an Africom news release.

Officers and enlisted leaders who received U.S. IMET training fill key positions in many partner African nations. As of last year, for example, 11 of 14 general officers in the Botswana Defense Force, as well as the BDF command sergeant major, were U.S. IMET graduates.

Ward said he anticipates 46 African countries will participate in IMET.

"The International Military Education and Training program, I think, provides long-term benefits for our national interests as well as transforming those militaries in positive ways," he said. "Those programs that deal with training and equipping our partner nations to better enable them to conduct counter-terror activities, to have better abilities to control their internal border, are very valuable."

Meanwhile, Ward said, Africom also is involved in providing training, education and civil military assistance in the Horn of Africa and supporting counterterrorism efforts in North and West African nations. It also is aiding the State Department-led training of roughly 20 battalions of peacekeepers per year and assisting coast guards of the maritime nations in East Africa.

The general said he is honored to serve with Defense Department military and civilian personnel and interagency teammates and make a difference on the continent every day.

"Their dedicated efforts are a testament to the spirit and determination to the American people and our commitment to contributing to the well-being and security of our nation and the people of Africa," he said.

Gates Pays Respects to Fallen Servicemembers at Dover

By Gerry J. Gilmore
American Forces Press Service

March 17, 2009 - Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates traveled to Dover Air Force Base, Del., last night to pay his respects to four servicemembers killed recently in Afghanistan, a senior Pentagon official said here today. Gates "wanted to personally honor the sacrifice" of the three soldiers and one airman who died last weekend in a roadside bomb attack near Jalalabad, Afghanistan, Press Secretary Geoff Morrell told reporters.

Jalalabad is located between the Afghan capital of Kabul and the Pakistani city of Peshawar.

The secretary's visit to Dover last night "was a very moving experience for him," Morrell said.

Gates has wanted to visit the facilities at Dover for some time, Morrell said. Dover's Charles C. Carson Center for Mortuary Affairs is the Defense Department's largest joint-service mortuary facility, and the only one in the continental United States. Dover also is the U.S. military's largest air terminal.

"The secretary was enormously impressed by the professionalism of the aircrew, the honor guards, the mortuary affairs personnel, and really everyone involved in this process," Morrell said. "He very much appreciates their steadfast commitment to treating our returning war dead as the fallen heroes they truly are."

There was no media presence during Gates' visit to Dover, Morrell said.

"We did not travel even with an official photographer," Morrell said, noting the trip was "merely a personal visit of the secretary's."

Meanwhile, Morrell said, a Defense Department working group probably is within weeks of presenting its recommendations for implementing a change in policy to allow the news media to photograph the flag-draped caskets of returning fallen servicemembers with their families' permission. Gates announced the policy change Feb. 26.

"There is still some additional work to do, and the secretary has to sign off on the final recommendations of the working group, in terms of how this is going to all take place," Morrell said.

Stratcom Prepares for Future Capabilities, General Says

By Army Staff Sgt. Michael J. Carden
American Forces Press Service

March 17, 2009 - The global financial crisis and the threat of nuclear proliferation and persistent warfare in the Middle East and Central Asia are playing a major role in determining future national security capabilities, the commander of U.S. Strategic Command told Congress here today. Air Force Gen. Kevin P. Chilton told the House Armed Services Committee's subcommittee on strategic forces that "2009 is an especially noteworthy year" because of the unique security challenges America faces.

Those challenges, along with the ever-changing rate of technology "often outpaces capabilities and policies," Chilton said. He added that he is looking forward to the upcoming Congressional Commissions Report on the Strategic Posture of the United States, as well as this year's Defense Department Quadrennial Defense Review and Nuclear Posture Review.

"The recommendations made in these studies will shape our national security capabilities long into the future," he said.

This year will be an important year for Congress to act on the issue of the aging U.S. nuclear stockpile, Chilton said. The stockpile, nuclear infrastructure and human capital are the most urgent concerns for the U.S. nuclear enterprise, he said. Modernization, he added, will "relieve growing uncertainty about the stockpile's future reliability and sustainability."

Credible deterrence operations depend on a reliable stockpile of nuclear weapons, Chilton said. And although U.S. nuclear weapons deployment, production, and testing have reduced substantially since the Cold War, many allies rely on the United States for those capabilities, he noted.

"Deterrence remains as central to America's national security as it was during the Cold War," Chilton said, "because, as ever, we would prefer to prevent war rather than to wage it."

On space operations, Chilton said space-based capabilities give the nation essential, but often unnoticed, capabilities. However, the satellites that carry those capabilities require more and careful attention to eliminate possibly lethal delays in missile defense launches.

"We have made progress in space situational awareness, but capability gaps remain, and require sustained momentum to fill," he said, noting last month's collision between the U.S. Iridium communication satellite and Russia's decommissioned military satellite.

Cyberspace, another key aspect of Stratcom's mission, has become increasingly important to the warfighter, Chilton said. He remains concerned about growing threats on computer networks and is calling for changes within the Defense Department's "fundamental network of culture, conduct and capabilities to address this mission," he said.

"We also endeavor to share our best [networking] practices with partners across the government," he said. "Still the adequate provisioning of cyber missions, especially with manpower, remains our greatest needs."

Stratcom continues to be proficient in executing operations in the realms of space, cyberspace and deterring war, Chilton said. He praised his command for its ability to provide "a unique global perspective in advocating for" missile defense, information operations, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance – capabilities the country needs to ensure national security, he said.

"In this uncertain world, [Congress's] support is critical to enabling successful execution across the command's assigned missions," he said, "and in realizing [the U.S.] vision to be leaders in strategic deterrence and preeminent global war fighters in space and cyberspace."

MILITARY CONTRACTS March 17, 2009

NAVY

Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding (NGSB), Inc., Pascagoula, Miss., is being awarded a $31,800,000 Basic Ordering Agreement for Post-Shakedown Availability (PSA) for DDG 51 class destroyers. The orders to be issued are for PSA planning and support services and will include advance planning, engineering support, on-site engineering liaison, craft assistance, the ordering and processing of required material in support of PSAs, and the accomplishment of emergent industrial availabilities. Emergent industrial availabilities include, but are not limited to, restricted availabilities, drydocking availabilities, and technical availabilities which may be required from time of ship's delivery through the SCN obligation work and limiting date. If necessary, orders may be issued to NGSB for PSA planning and support and emergent industrial availabilities for DDG 51 class destroyers built by Bath Iron Works Corporation (BIW) if BIW is unable to perform the work. Work will be performed in Pascagoula, Miss. (40 percent) and in the ships' homeport (60 percent), which may include Norfolk, Va.; San Diego, Calif.; and Mayport, Fla., and is expected to be completed by September 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00024-09-G-2305).

Jacobs Technology, Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., is being awarded a $10,969,384 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N68936-06-D-0001) to provide for design and development engineering, test and evaluation, transition engineering, and management support services for the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division. Work will be performed in China Lake, Calif. (83 percent) and Point Mugu, Calif. (17 percent), and is expected to be completed in June 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake, Calif., is the contracting activity.

BAE Systems Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, is being awarded a $9,982,999 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-06-C-4408) for repairs and maintenance to various shipboard systems on the USS Port Royal (CG-73). Work will be performed in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Contract funds in the amount of $11,140 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is the contracting activity.

Harper Construction Co., San Diego, Calif., is being awarded $8,197,536 for firm-fixed-price task order #025 under a previously awarded multiple award construction contract (N62473-06-D-1056) for design, repair, and renovation of BEQ Bldg 530529 and Utility Bldg 530530, Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif. This task order also contains three unexercised options, which if exercised would increase the cumulative contract value to $10,277,265. Work will be performed in Oceanside, Calif., and is expected to be completed by March 2010. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Three proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity.

L-3 Communications, Electron Devices Division, Williamsport, Pa., is being awarded a $6,313,780 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for repair of cross field amplifier electron tubes for the AN-SPY-1 radar program. Work will be performed at Williamsport, Pa., and work is expected to be completed by August 2010. Contract funds will not expire before the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Inventory Control Point is the contracting activity (N00104-09-D-D010).

AIR FORCE

The Air Force is modifying a cost type contract with Lockheed Martin Corporation of Cherry Hill, New Jersey for $11,449,845. The objective of the Integrated Crisis Early Warning System program is to develop a prototype system of integrated computational, social and political science models that forecast the occurrence and level of intensity of various conflict events of Interests of associated with country instability. At this time, $9,600,000 has been obligated. Det 1 AFRl/PKDA, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8650-07-C-7749, P00004).

Defense Department Releases Sexual Assault Statistics

By John J. Kruzel and Army Staff Sgt. Michael J. Carden
American Forces Press Service

March 17, 2009 - The Defense Department today released a congressional report that examines sexual assault allegations in the military services and sets policies for reducing incidents. Key components of the annual analysis include a finding that indicates a rise in the number of incidents reported in fiscal 2008 and details of department-led initiatives aimed at preventing sexual assault and increasing the accountability of offenders.

"Given the fear and stigma associated with the crime, sexual assault remains one of our nation's most under-reported crimes in both the military and civilian community," Dr. Kaye Whitley, the director of the Defense Department's Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office, said during a Pentagon news conference here today. "The department has been aggressively pursuing efforts to increase reporting and convince more victims to seek care and support services."

The analysis found 2,908 sexual assault "reports" in fiscal 2008, which is roughly an 8 percent increase compared to fiscal 2007. But officials cautioned that the rise in reporting -- a figure that represents the total number of sexual assaults reported -- is not necessarily indicative that more incidents occurred.

One possible explanation for the increase could be that higher numbers of victims are reporting incidents as people become more aware of sexual assault in general, and the military's robust support network, Whitley said.

"This does not mean sexual assaults have gone up," she said. "This means that reports have gone up, which we see as very positive. The increase of reports means the department's policy of getting victims to come forward is making a difference."

Defense officials said during a briefing yesterday that the aggregate number of reports combines incidents that vary in the degree of offense committed. About 63 percent represent rape or aggravated assault. Also, 251 incidents occurred in combat areas, with 141 in Iraq and 22 in Afghanistan. Those numbers increased from fiscal 2007, Whitley said.

Speaking on sexual assault prevention, Whitley said the department seeks to establish a military culture that calls on bystanders to play a more active role in preventing assaults.

She said the spirit of the effort was partly inspired by a campaign launched to curb drunk driving, in which friends were encouraged to dissuade their peers from getting behind the wheel while intoxicated. There are parallels between the programs as many cases of sexual assault involve alcohol.

"If you see one of your buddies serve drinks to somebody to get them drunk, maybe what you do is step up and say, 'Why don't you wait until she's sober?'" Whitley said in an interview last week, illustrating an example of bystander intervention.

As part of the department's social marketing prevention campaign, a public service announcement is set to launch worldwide next month, which will promote bystander intervention. The 20-second video shows still pictures of male and female servicemembers with a dubbed, male voice saying, "preventing sexual assault is part of my duty."

"Our goal is to strengthen the knowledge and the skills of servicemembers and empower them to identify and safely intervene in situations that may lead up to sexual assault," Whitley said.

The department's multipronged approach to tackling the subject acknowledges that not all incidents are preventable. Another component of the policy is raising awareness that victims have a strong support network should they seek help.

Whitley said an average of one in six women and one in 32 men in the United States experience some form of sexual assault in their lifetime.

But the department hopes its robust approach to caring for victims will encourage them to alert the proper authority -- the sexual assault response coordinator based on every military installation and dedicated to providing such assistance -- when incidents occur.

"We have a 24-hour system in place to respond to sexual assaults," she said, adding that the response coordinator supports the victim through every step of the process, including medical care counseling and other services.

Those who are victimized by sexual assault can report the incident one of two ways: they can file an unrestricted or restricted report, the latter of which protects the anonymity of the victim and does not lead to a criminal investigation.

Of the 2,908 reports of sexual assault in fiscal 2008, 2,155 were unrestricted, while 753 were restricted, according to the congressional report.

The Defense Department understands the need to balance victims' anonymity vs. pursuing justice against the perpetrator, Whitley said, adding that the department will always support the victim's right to choose which course of reporting with which they're most comfortable.

Neither the victim's command nor the police are notified in cases of restricted, or anonymous, reporting. But victims are permitted to have a voluntary forensic examination performed soon after the incident, with the results being saved for up to a year, should an investigation be launched later.

Whitley noted that last year, 110 incidents that began as restricted reports were decided by the victims to be transferred to unrestricted.

"What we hope is that the victim will feel that they've gained a sense of control back and maybe they'll begin to develop confidence in our system and later switch to unrestricted so we can hold that offender accountable," Whitley said.

Oftentimes, taking the first step -- reporting the incident -- proves difficult. According to defense officials, of the 6.8 percent of women and 1.8 percent of men who indicated they experienced unwanted sexual contact, the majority -- 79 percent of women and 78 percent of men -- chose not to report it.

The most frequently cited reasons for not reporting the incident include:

-- Felt uncomfortable making a report (58 percent of women and 51 percent of men);

-- Thought they would be labeled a troublemaker (56 percent of women and 41 percent of men);

-- Did not want anyone to know about the incident (56 percent of women and 47 percent of men);

-- Did not think anything would be done (53 percent of women and 44 percent of men);

-- Feared retaliation (50 percent of women and 38 percent of men);

-- Not important enough to report (48 percent of women and 60 percent of men);

-- Thought they would not be believed (41 percent of women and 35 percent of men);

-- Thought reporting would take too much time and effort (36 percent of women and 46 percent of men); and

-- Did not report because they did not know how (18 percent of women and 26 percent of men).

"It is my hope today that when [servicemembers] see this report or press conference, that they will be encouraged and come forward to report sexual assault and receive care," Whitley said. "Sexual assault harms our people and erodes our mission readiness. The department remains committed to aggressively pursuing increased reporting of sexual assault, providing first-class care and preventing this crime before it occurs."

Caring for Veterans Is Matter of American Honor, Obama Says

By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service

March 16, 2009 - Caring for veterans is a responsibility and duty for all Americans, and the employees at the Department of Veterans Affairs are those who are charged with repaying "that debt of honor," President Barack Obama said during a ceremony here marking the department's 20th anniversary today. The president promised the VA employees that he will make good on his promise to create a 21st-century department.

VA, formerly called the Veterans Administration, became a cabinet-level department in 1989. The employees are charged with providing education, training benefits, health care, home loans and cemeteries for American veterans. "It's a commitment that lasts from the day our veterans retire that uniform to the day that they are put to rest, and it continues on for their families," the president said.

U.S. servicemembers are the country's best and brightest, Obama said. "They are our bravest, enlisting in a time of war, enduring tour after tour of duty, serving with honor under the most difficult circumstances and making sacrifices that many of us cannot begin to imagine," he said. The department must take care of these people and of their families, he added.

The VA mission always is vital, Obama said, but it is even more so during long and difficult conflicts like today's. "Last month, I announced my strategy for ending the war in Iraq, and I made it very clear that this strategy would not end with the military plans and diplomatic agendas, but would endure through my commitment to upholding our sacred trust with every man and woman who has served this country," the president said. "And the same holds true for our troops serving in Afghanistan."

The president has requested an extra $25 billion for the department over the next five years. The agency – under the leadership of retired Army Gen. Eric K. Shinseki, former Army chief of staff – is reviewing its operations.

"With this budget, we don't just fully fund our VA health care program," the president said. "We expand it to serve an additional 500,000 veterans by 2013, to provide better health care in more places and to dramatically improve services related to mental health and injuries like post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury."

Obama said technology also will help to cut red tape and ease the transition from active duty. He promised new help for homeless veterans, "because those heroes have a home."

"It's the country they served -- the United States of America," he said. "And until we reach a day when not a single veteran sleeps on our nation's streets, our work remains unfinished."

He called on VA employees to help to implement the GI Bill for the 21st century. Just as the veterans of World War II formed the backbone of the progress after that war, the veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan too, can be the catalyst for progress. The deadline for putting the rules for the new GI Bill in place is Aug. 1.

"That's how we'll show our servicemen and women that when you come home to America, America will be here for you," Obama said. "That's how we will ensure that those who have borne the battle, and their families, will have every chance to live out their dreams."

Transforming the agency is a tall order, Obama said, but he added that he has the fullest confidence that the men and women of the department can do it.

The United States will "fulfill our sacred trust and serve our returning heroes as well as they've served us," he said.

MILITARY CONTRACTS March 16, 2009

NAVY

Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding (NGSB), Inc., Pascagoula, Miss., is being awarded a $31,800,000 basic ordering agreement for Post-Shakedown Availability (PSA) for DDG 51 Class Destroyers. The orders to be issued are for PSA planning and support services and will include advance planning, engineering support, on-site engineering liaison, craft assistance, the ordering and processing of required material in support of PSAs, and the accomplishment of emergent industrial availabilities. Emergent industrial availabilities include, but are not limited to, Restricted Availabilities, Drydocking Availabilities, and Technical Availabilities which may be required from time of ship's delivery through the SCN Obligation Work and Limiting Date. If necessary, orders may be issued to NGSB for PSA planning and support and emergent industrial availabilities for DDG 51 Class Destroyers built by Bath Iron Works Corp. (BIW) if BIW is unable to perform the work. Work will be performed in Pascagoula, Miss. (40 percent) and in the ships' homeport (60 percent), which may include Norfolk, Va.; San Diego, Calif.; and Mayport, Fla., and is expected to be completed by September 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00024-09-G-2305).

Jacobs Technology, Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., is being awarded a $10,969,384 modification to a previously awarded cost plus fixed fee, indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity contract (N68936-06-D-0001) to provide for design and development engineering, test and evaluation, transition engineering, and management support services for the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division. Work will be performed in China Lake, Calif. (83 percent) and Point Mugu, Calif. (17 percent), and is expected to be completed in June 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake, Calif., is the contracting activity.

BAE Systems Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, is being awarded a $9,982,999 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-06-C-4408) for repairs and maintenance to various shipboard systems on the USS Port Royal (CG-73). Work will be performed in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Contract funds in the amount of $11,140 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is the contracting activity.

Harper Construction Co., San Diego, Calif., is being awarded $8,197,536 for firm fixed price task order #025 under a previously awarded multiple award construction contract (N62473-06-D-1056) for design, repair, and renovation of BEQ Bldg 530529 and Utility Bldg 530530, Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif. This task order also contains three unexercised options, which if exercised would increase the cumulative contract value to $10,277,265. Work will be performed in Oceanside, Calif., and is expected to be completed by March 2010. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Three proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity.

L-3 Communications, Electron Devices Division, Williamsport, Pa., is being awarded a $6,313,780 firm fixed price, indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity contract for repair of cross field amplifier electron tubes for the AN-SPY-1 radar program. Work will be performed at Williamsport, Pa., and work is expected to be completed by August 2010. Contract funds will not expire before the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Inventory Control Point is the contracting activity (N00104-09-D-D010).

AIR FORCE

The Air Force is awarding an indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity contract to University of Dayton Research Institute of Dayton Ohio for a Maximum of $9,880,000. The advanced behavior and Life Precision of Aerospace Materials program will perform research and development to address the Air Force need to develop a comprehensive understanding of the physics behind damage accumulation and failure of aerospace materials under a wide range of service conditions. At this time, $757,311 has been obligated. Det 1 AFRl/PKMM, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity. (FA8650-09-D-5223)

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

Southeast Power Systems of Orlando, Orlando, Fla.* is being awarded a maximum $7,936,008 firm fixed price contract for pump, fuel and metering support of multi-purpose wheeled vehicles. There are no other locations of performance. There were originally 2 proposals solicited with 1 response. Using service is Army. The date of performance completion is March 13, 2014. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency, Warren (DLA-Warren), Warren, Mich. (SPRDL1-09-D-0005).