Military News

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

USS Nimitz, Carrier Air Wing 11 Underway for Carrier Quals

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Peter Merrill and Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Andrew Jandik, USS Nimitz (CVN 68) Public Affairs

USS NIMITZ, At Sea (NNS) -- The aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11 began carrier qualifications July 12 off the coast of Southern California.

Carrier qualifications test both CVW 11 and the Nimitz crew.

"The Nimitz and Air Wing 11 team did a great job of refreshing flight deck currency," said Capt. Eric Wright, Nimitz's air department head. "These operations aren't always fast or error-free, but we operated deliberately and safely. It was a great first day back."

Nimitz and CVW-11 will continue to launch and recover aircraft throughout the week of July 12 to qualify and re-qualify pilots, extending Nimitz's flight deck certification.

According to Aviation Boatswains Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Marc Nielsen of air department's V-2 division, it is good for the crew to get back into a routine.

"Our job really only exists out to sea. This is where the action is," said Nielsen.

This is the first time aircraft have touched down on Nimitz's flight deck since returning from an eight-month deployment in March 2010.

"This is a good chance to knock the rust off." said Intelligence Specialist 1st Class (SW) Brandon Soileau, operations department division leading petty officer.

Both Soileau and Nielsen said conducting carrier qualifications also allows everyone on the ship to stay current with personal qualifications.

"A lot of people are getting a good chance to go do their jobs," said Soileau.

Nimitz is the flagship for Carrier Strike Group 11. Nimitz returned home to San Diego March 26 after completing a successful eight-month Western Pacific deployment.

Three AFPC Airmen become U.S. citizens

By Staff Sgt. Steve Grever
Air Force Personnel Center Public Affairs

RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE, Texas – Three Airmen from the Air Force Personnel Center here raised their right hands and pledged to defend and support the U.S. Constitution for the second time in their lives during a special naturalization ceremony July 9 in San Antonio. The first time they made this commitment was when they initially joined the Air Force, but this time it was to become U.S. citizens.

Airmen 1st Class Siarhei Marynin, Jourdan Castaneda and Abraham Flomo, Total Force Service Center sustainment apprentices, were three of six Air Force members to take the oath of allegiance and receive their naturalization certificates. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigrations Services office administered the ceremony for six Airmen and two Army soldiers in recognition of their commitment to defending America and the unique journeys each of them took to become American citizens.

Airman Castaneda was born in the Philippines and enlisted in the Air Force in November 2009 and said getting his citizenship will help him reach his goal of becoming a chief master sergeant some day.

“I really want to affect change at the enlisted level,” Airman Castaneda said.

Airman Marynin joined the Air Force in November 2009 from a small country called Belarus, which is nestled between Poland and Russia. He said his father was in the Russian military and he grew up in a military family.

“I joined the Air Force because it gives you an opportunity to have a good career and become an officer,” Airman Marynin said.

After the Airmen received their naturalization certificates, Airman Flomo, a native of Liberia, shared the experiences that lead him to become a U.S. citizen and join the Air Force.

"I come from a country where civil war is the norm,” Airman Flomo said. “Today, I stand here, proud to wear this uniform. We are now all Americans. I thank you.”

Double-Amputee Active Duty Soldier Takes Charge of Army Wounded Warrior Program

Arlington, VA —Today, Lt. Col. Gregory Gadson took over the leadership of the Army Wounded Warrior Program (AW2), a six-year-old program that provides personalized support to severely wounded, ill and injured soldiers and veterans, as well as their families. Gadson’s 22-year military career began at West Point with a field artillery commission and includes several combat tours, most recently as a battalion commander in Iraq, where an improvised explosive device (IED) resulted in the amputation of both his legs. Lt. Col. Gadson was recently selected for promotion to the rank of Colonel.

“As an alumni of AW2’s support, I know first-hand the value that the Army Wounded Warrior Program brings to the long term success of wounded soldiers. This is the perfect place for me to serve, and I am honored to have this mission,” said AW2 Director Lt. Col. Gregory Gadson. “For our severely wounded, ill and injured soldiers and veterans, AW2 provides an umbrella of expertise that helps foster the independence that leads to long-term success. For me, AW2's personalized support led to my continued service in the Army.”

AW2, a component of the U.S. Army Warrior Transition Command (WTC), provides each severely wounded soldier – such as those with amputations, burns, paralysis, vision loss, post traumatic stress disorder, or traumatic brain injury–with a local AW2 Advocate. The AW2 Advocate’s role is to foster the soldier’s independence as they learn to adapt to their injury and transition to life post-injury, whether that is back to duty or into civilian status. The AW2 Advocate connects the soldier with resources, benefits and information, and also provides a shoulder to lean on or motivation to keep them moving forward.

“Having served twice with Lt. Col. Gadson in Afghanistan, I know there is no better leader for this program. He understands soldiers, knows the challenges faced by our severely wounded, and is eager to build on AW2's proven success,” stated Brig. Gen. Gary Cheek, WTC commander.

WTC, a major subordinate command under the U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM), serves as the central comprehensive source for warrior care support across the Army. Its mission is to develop, coordinate and integrate the Army’s Warrior Care and Transition Program for wounded, ill and injured soldiers, veterans, and their families in order to promote future success in the force or in civilian live.

Col. Jim Rice, the outgoing AW2 director, will now serve as the Chief, Health Service Support Directorate on the Joint Staff. In this role he will coordinate medical support for all the services to combatant commanders around the world.

Department of Defense’s Oldest and Largest Exchange Service to Mark 115 Years of Support

DALLAS – As the Army & Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES) readies to mark 115 years of service and support to America’s military, the military command’s mission remains basically the same: provide quality goods and services at competitively low prices and generate earnings to support Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) and Services programs.

Established July 25, 1895, when the War Department issued General Order number 46 directing post commanders to establish an Exchange at every post where practicable, AAFES continues to deliver a comprehensive and customer–focused benefit to troops and their families at installations throughout America, Europe, the Pacific and Middle East.

In addition to its flagship Exchange facilities, modern AAFES operations also include convenience stores, car care centers, military clothing sales stores, fast food restaurants, retail concession services such as flower shops and gift stores, vending, telecommunications support and a wide variety of personal services through more than 3,100 facilities in 25 countries, five US territories and all 50 states.

The scope of current operations goes well beyond the conventional offerings the War Department might have envisioned in the late 1800’s as AAFES today operates bakeries, water bottling activities and provides more than 22,000 meals a day to troops’ children at 91 Department of Defense Schools in nine countries.

Just like the merchants who supplied provisions to America’s troops in the late 19th century, AAFES associates continue to live and work alongside those they serve. In fact, more than 300 associates are currently deployed to Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom, actively delivering a slice of Americana to troops through 90 Exchange operations, 72 phone centers and 250 fast food restaurants scattered throughout the Middle East.

Closer to home, the largest and most senior Exchange service is focused on energizing outreach efforts to communicate the value, benefit and capabilities it brings to the military community. Recognizing the pivotal role National Guard and Reserve troops are playing as they transition from a strategic force to an operational force, AAFES is specifically reaching out to “Citizen Soldiers’” families to ensure they understand the value of their exchange benefit not only downrange, but also on the installation, online or over the phone. AAFES’ outreach efforts are further enhanced through social media channels such as Twitter, YouTube, Facebook and SalutetoYourService.com, that strengthen positive, long-term relationships with military shoppers.

“AAFES’ commitment to America’s troops is as strong as it’s ever been,” said Col. Virgil Williams, AAFES chief of staff. “Whether at their home station, deployed overseas, providing support in the wake of a natural disaster, or even in the hospital, AAFES is there.”

Keeping in the spirit of exceptional service and support, Exchanges and the Exchange Online Store are inviting authorized customers to “celebrate the savings” from Sunday, July 25 through Tuesday, July 27.

Shoppers who stop by CONUS exchanges during the three-day period can register to win a $5,000 Exchange shopping spree while runners-up will receive one of three Samsung LED TVs ranging from 40-55”. Exchange patrons in the U.S. can also enter to win a round trip for two to Hollywood to meet Mario Lopez and attend a taping of eXTRA.

Military shoppers stationed overseas who stop by the Exchange during the three-day period can register to win a $5,000 Exchange shopping spree, a backpack or set of luggage.

In addition to the giveaways and sweepstakes, Exchanges across the globe will offer a variety of great deals centered on AAFES’ 115th birthday. Shoppers using their MILITARY STAR® card, for example, will receive $15 off any purchase of $115 or more as well as 15 cents off a gallon of gas during the three-days of festivities. Additionally, several items at aafes.com, including a Bulova watch, diamond bangle bracelet, Voyager Bluetooth headset and Cuisinart Chef’s 10-piece cookware set, will be offered for just $115.

Since its establishment in 1895, AAFES has been involved in 14 major contingencies (to include the Spanish-American War, WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Grenada, Panama, the Balkans and Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom) and several dozen humanitarian and disaster relief contingencies.

AAFES is a joint command of the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force, and is directed by a Board of Directors who is responsible to the Secretaries of the Army and the Air Force through the Service Chiefs of Staff. AAFES has the dual mission of providing authorized patrons with articles of merchandise and services and of generating non-appropriated fund earnings as a supplemental source of funding for military MWR and Services programs.

Rules Change on Escorting Families During Duty Station Moves

By Wm. Cullen James, Navy Personnel Command Public Affairs

MILLINGTON, Tenn. (NNS) -- Service members traveling on indeterminate temporary duty (ITDY) orders are now authorized to escort their family members to and from an alternate location at government expense, according to NAVADMIN 227/10, which was released July 9.

The message announced the change in the Joint Federal Travel Regulations (JFTR) law that went into effect March 15.

The new policy adds an escort entitlement for Sailors to accompany their family during an authorized move. There is no change to family member travel.

ITDY is similar to temporary duty (TDY), which the Navy calls temporary additional duty (TAD), but there is no specified time period and no end-date in the orders. A modification or follow-on orders are required for the member to go to their permanent duty station (PDS).

According to Cmdr. Carl Chaffin, distribution management and procedures branch head, this change in policy is the culmination of more than two years of work that was initiated at the direction of the Task Force Individual Augmentee (IA) Conference held in the fall of 2007.

"To allow service members returning from IA assignments to reunite with their families was a major issue of that conference," said Chaffin. "Reducing the requirement from 365 to 210 days to be eligible for ITDY orders and the escort entitlement were the courses of action taken to meet that issue."

To apply for escort entitlement, the member must be on ITDY orders dated March 15 or later. Orders dated prior to March 15 can be modified, but this modification does not grandfather in prior travel.

"ITDY orders are issued to service members going on temporary duty when the return date is unknown," said Chaffin. "To qualify for ITDY orders, the Navy has reduced the estimated minimum number of days on assignment to 210 days. ITDY orders extend the same entitlements as TDY orders, plus additional entitlements for moving family members to an alternate place. The escort option only applies to the member when assisting family members such as for the purpose of concurrent travel."

Under the new rules, service members must request approval of their itinerary prior to starting travel. Travel is either from the PDS to the ITDY location or from the ITDY location to the PDS. Service members currently on Global War on Terrorism Support Assignments (GSA) cannot be reimbursed retroactively for previous travel, but may make a request for their return travel.

Some typical scenarios:

• A service member accompanies family members from an alternate location en route to the old PDS upon return from an individual augmentee assignment when the servicemember does not have follow-on permanent change of station orders.

• The member escorts family members to an alternate location and returns to the Sailor's PDS prior to departing for an IA/GSA.

• When the servicemember has follow-on PCS orders, travel from the ITDY location to the old PDS (if family members elected to stay there) and travel to new PDS when returning from a GSA.

The government will not pay for escort travel when:

• The member wants to use it to arrange for household goods or privately owned vehicle shipments, take leave or any other personal convenience.

• The member does not have ITDY orders. Any travel prior to having written orders is not reimbursable.

• The member has already reported to the new PDS.

Sailors Shine in Yorktown Waterman's Heritage Festival

By Mark O. Piggott, Naval Weapons Station Yorktown Public Affairs

YORKTOWN, Va. (NNS) -- Sailors from Naval Weapons Station (NWS) Yorktown enjoyed the fun and festivities of the 2010 Yorktown Waterman's Heritage Festival at the Yorktown Waterman's Museum in Yortown, Va., July 11.

The festival is held annually to honor watermen who fish on the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries and the men and women of the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard who protect them.

The festival features waterman's boat races, maritime and environmental educational displays, arts and crafts vendors and various military units. Sailors from the NWS Yorktown's Security Department brought a 45-foot harbor security boat and patrol cruiser to display for festival patrons.

Other military elements included a U.S. Coast Guard patrol boat from U.S. Coast Guard Training Center Yorktown and Marine Corps humvees from 2nd Fleet's Anti-Terrorism Security Team (FAST) at NWS Yorktown.

"The military's participation is always a big part of the festival every year," said David Niebuhr, executive director for the Yorktown Waterman's Museum. "We can't do enough to thank them for their service to our country and for their support of the Yorktown community."

The highlight of the festival is the annual waterman boat races. Each year, the local watermen try to win honors and bragging rights for the next year. From outboard motors to big diesel engines, the boats put on quite a show for all the spectators to see.

"It's amazing to see what these workboats are capable of," said Capt. Chuck Marks, NWS Yorktown's commanding officer. "These men take pride in their work and show it by maintaining their boats in a high state of readiness. That's the mark of a true seaman."

Throughout the day, people who wandered the festival grounds got a chance to see military hardware up close and interact with Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen. The festival gives the local community the opportunity to see their military neighbors outside the fence line.

"Our mission of fleet ordnance support requires intense security and some restrictions, especially when it comes to the base operations," said Marks. "We welcome opportunities like the Waterman's Festival to bring us a little bit closer to the community we call home."

"I know we can always rely on the military to help us in any way, shape or form," said Niebuhr. "They add significantly to the Waterman's Museum goal of educating people on the resources and history of the York River."

The festival concluded with a rousing performance by the U.S. Fleet Forces Band "Four-Star Edition" playing top rock, pop and country hits.

MILITARY CONTRACTS July 13, 2010

NAVY

ITT Electronic Systems, Integrated Electronic Warfare Systems, Clifton, N.J., is being awarded a $42,498,896 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for technology maturation efforts in support of the next-generation jammer, which will replace the ALQ-99 tactical jamming system. Technology maturation efforts include research in support of future development of airborne electronic attack capability from a tactical-size airborne stand-off/mod-escort platform. Specifically, the contractor will mature and provide a concept demonstrator (CD) design and mature critical technology elements required to support CD design. Work will be performed in Clifton, N.J. (44 percent); St. Louis, Mo. (38 percent); and North Amityville, N.Y. (18 percent). Work is expected to be completed in April 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via Broad Agency Announcement, with four proposals received. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity (N00019-10-C-0071).

Raytheon Co., Space and Airborne Systems, Electronic Warfare Systems, Goleta, Calif., is being awarded a $41,987,101 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for technology maturation efforts in support of the next-generation jammer, which will replace the ALQ-99 Tactical jamming system. Technology maturation efforts include research in support of future development of airborne electronic attack capability from a tactical-size airborne stand-off/mod-escort platform. Specifically, the contractor will mature and provide a concept demonstrator (CD) design and mature critical technology elements required to support CD design. Work will be performed in Goleta, Calif. (25 percent); El Segundo, Calif. (25 percent); Dallas, Texas (25 percent); Fort Wayne, Ind. (10 percent); Indianapolis, Ind. (7 percent); Torrance, Calif. (5 percent); Fairfax, Va. (2 percent); and Anacortes, Wash. (1 percent). Work is expected to be completed in April 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via Broad Agency Announcement, with four proposals received. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity (N00019-10-C-0073).

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Integrated Systems - Eastern Region, Bethpage, N.Y., is being awarded a $41,976,091 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for technology maturation efforts in support of the next-generation jammer, which will replace the ALQ-99 tactical jamming system. Technology maturation efforts include research in support of future development of airborne electronic attack capability from a tactical-size airborne stand-off/mod-escort platform. Specifically, the contractor will mature and provide a concept demonstrator (CD) design and mature critical technology elements required to support CD design. Work will be performed in Linthicum, Md. (60 percent); Bethpage, N.Y. (34 percent); Rockledge, Fla. (5 percent); and Mojave, Calif. (1 percent). Work is expected to be completed in April 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via Broad Agency Announcement, with four proposals received. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity (N00019-10-C-0072).

BAE Systems, Information and Electronic Systems Integration, Inc., Nashua, N.H., is being awarded a $41,748,137 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for technology maturation efforts in support of the next-generation jammer, which will replace the ALQ-99 tactical jamming system. Technology maturation efforts include research in support of future development of airborne electronic attack capability from a tactical-size airborne stand-off/mod-escort platform. Specifically, the contractor will mature and provide a concept demonstrator (CD) design and mature critical technology elements required to support CD design. Work will be performed in Nashua, N.H. (32 percent); Cincinnati, Ohio (27 percent); Lansdale, Pa. (25 percent); and Melbourne, Fla. (16 percent). Work is expected to be completed in April 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via Broad Agency Announcement, with four proposals received. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity (N00019-10-C-0070).

Bell-Boeing Joint Project Office, Amarillo, Texas, is being awarded a $12,099,188 modification to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N00019-07-C-0007) for the procurement of various obsolete parts for MV-22 and CV-22 aircraft, including both life-of-type and bridge buys. The associated obsolete parts are for the Display Electronics Unit II; Dual Digital Map System; Air Data Unit; Slim Multi Functional Display; and Thermoelectric Cooler Modular Unit. Work will be performed in Fort Worth, Texas (95 percent); Vergennes, Vt. (3 percent); and Albuquerque, N.M. (2 percent). Work is expected to be completed in October 2014. Contract funds in the amount of $10,124,259 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

HDR Architecture, Inc., Chicago, Ill., is being awarded a $10,000,000 modification to previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N40083-08-D-0065) to exercise Option 2 for architectural and engineering services at Naval Station Great Lakes. The work to be performed provides for partial design packages; total design packages; design-build request for proposal packages; repairs and alterations to existing facilities; collateral equipment lists; project preliminary hazard analysis; obtaining permits and regulatory approvals; surveys, topographic and boundary; soil investigations; comprehensive interior design; contractor submittal review; construction inspection, observation and consultation; operations and maintenance support information; environmental assessments; fire protection; anti-terrorism/force protection evaluation and design; designs for phased construction; and as-built drawing preparation. The current total estimated contract amount after exercise of this option will be $30,000,000. Work will be performed in Great Lakes, Ill., and work for this option period is expected to be completed July 15, 2011. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Midwest, Great Lakes, Ill., is the contracting activity.

Raytheon Co., Tucson, Ariz., is being awarded a $9,598,456 modification to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N00019-09-C-0007) for the procurement of 20 Tomahawk Block IV mid-body range safety system kits and flight test kits. These components will be installed in each Tomahawk Block IV flight test missile to provide telemetry and safety-related communications between the missile and either ground or airborne safety controllers. Work will be performed in Tucson, Ariz. (45 percent); Bristol, Pa. (15 percent); San Diego, Calif. (14 percent); Westminster, Colo. (12 percent); Berryville, Ark. (5 percent); Lancaster, Pa. (2 percent); Huntsville, Ala. (1 percent); Joplin, Mo. (1 percent); Tulsa, Okla. (1 percent); Ontario, Calif. (1 percent); and miscellaneous locations throughout the U.S. (3 percent). Work is expected to be completed in May 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

Y. Hata & Co., Ltd.*, Honolulu, Hawaii, is being awarded a maximum $40,500,000 fixed-price with economic price adjustment, sole-source contract for full-line food distribution. There are no other locations of performance. Using services are Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. There was originally one proposal solicited with one response. The date of performance completion is April 14, 2011. The Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., is the contracting activity (SPM300-09-D-3295).

Y. Hata & Co., Ltd.*, Honolulu, Hawaii, is being awarded a maximum $10,125,000 fixed-price with economic price adjustment, sole-source contract for full-line food distribution. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Navy. There was originally one proposal solicited with one response. The date of performance completion is April 14, 2011. The Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., is the contracting activity (SPM300-09-D-3294).

Adanac Industries, Inc.*, Eastlake, Ohio, is being awarded a maximum $8,856,000 firm-fixed-price with indefinite-quantity for antifriction bearing housing. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Air Force. The original proposal was solicited via the Defense Logistics Agency Internet Bid Board System Web site with two responses. The date of performance completion is Dec. 24, 2011. The Defense Supply Center Richmond, Richmond, Va., is the contracting activity (SPM4A7-10-D-0237).

Adanac Industries, Inc.*, Eastlake, Ohio, is being awarded a maximum $8,856,000 firm-fixed-price with indefinite-quantity for antifriction bearing housing. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Air Force. The original proposal was solicited via the Defense Logistics Agency Internet Bid Board System Web site with two responses. The date of performance completion is Dec. 29, 2011. The Defense Supply Center Richmond, Richmond, Va., is the contracting activity (SPM4A7-10-D-0251).

ARMY

Raydon Corp., Daytona Beach, Fla., was awarded on July 9 a $36,355,550 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract is for 11 Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicle virtual trainers for the Army National Guard. Work is to be performed in Daytona Beach, Fla., with an estimated completion date of Nov. 30, 2011. Over 50 bids were solicited with one bid received. National Guard Bureau, ZC-AQ, Arlington, Va., is the contracting activity (W9133L-10-F-0130).

Conti Federal Services, Inc., South Plainfield, N.J., was awarded on July 7 a $7,027,043 firm-fixed-price contract. T his contract is for the construction of "Westbank and Vicinity, New Orleans, LA Hurricane Protection Project, WBV-09C Hero to Oakville HWY 23 Crossing; Plaquemines Parish, La." Work is to be performed in Plaquemines Parish, La., with an estimated completion date of May 23, 2010. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with four bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans District, New Orleans, La., is the contracting activity (W912P8-10-C-0095).

Science Application International Corp., San Diego, Calif., was awarded on July 9 a $5,549,168 firm-fixed-price contract for non-personal services in support of the "Advanced Electronic Magnetic Pulse Test & Technical Assistance In Accordance with Statement of Work." Work is to be performed in Fort Belvoir, Va., with an estimated completion date of Oct. 31, 2013. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, R&D Enterprise Contracts, BE-BCRB, Fort Belvoir, Va., is the contracting activity (DTRA01-03-D-0005).

AIR FORCE

New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, N.M., was awarded a $5,892,639 contract which will establish an educational outreach program that will develop, implement and maintain an integrated education recruitment and professional development system. At this time, $240,000 has been obligated. AFRL/RVKE, Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M., is the contracting activity (FA9451-10-2-0259).

Boeing Co., Fort Walton Beach, Fla., was awarded a $7,000,000 contract which will support the 40mm gun requirement for the AC-130 Plus Four program. At this time, $1,173,207 has been obligated. 782 CBSG/GBKAA, Robins Air Force Base, Ga., is the contracting activity (FA8520-10-D-0010).

No More C-17s, Defense Officials Tell Congress

By Lisa Daniel
American Forces Press Service

July 13, 2010 - The military has more than enough large transport planes, and the appropriation of any more in the next budget year will force some into premature retirement, Defense Department officials told a congressional panel today.

"We have enough C-17s," Mike McCord, principal deputy undersecretary of defense (comptroller), said. "Money spent on things we don't need takes away from those we do need."

Along with McCord, Air Force Maj. Gen. Susan Y. Desjardins, director of strategic plans for Air Mobility Command, and Alan Estevez, principal deputy assistant secretary of defense for logistical and materiel readiness, repeated Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates' position against the purchase of more C-17s to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs' federal financial management ubcommittee.

All three defense officials agreed with the subcommittee's leaders, Sens. Thomas Carper and John McCain, that the C-17, in addition to the C-5, has been critical to airlift in and out of Iraq and Afghanistan. However, they said, the military's current fleet of 223 C-17s and 111 C-5s is more than enough airlift capability for years to come.

A department study that concluded in February was consistent with two other studies that found that the current fleet is sufficient "even in the most demanding environments" to take the military through 2016, McCord said. The oldest plane in the transport fleet, Lockheed's C-5A Galaxy, will be viable until 2025, and the fleet as a whole should last until 2040, he said.

The department has not requested C-17s, built by Boeing, since the fiscal 2007 budget, yet Congress has added them every year since, spending about $1.25 billion on C-17s "that we don't want or need," said McCord, a 21-year staff member of the Senate Armed Services Committee before his current appointment.

Any additional appropriation for C-17s will have to be offset by retiring some of the military's older – but still viable -- transport planes, the defense officials said.

And, the defense officials said, adding force structure such as aircraft always entails additional costs in training, maintenance, and infrastructure, such as new hangars, bases and tooling. The department spends about $50,000 per aircraft per year to store aircraft where spare parts are available, Desjardins said.

"It's the gift that keeps on giving, because if you give it to us, we'll maintain it," Estevez said.

It would be more cost-effective, the defense officials said, to modify the C-5M for longer viability to continue to work in conjunction with the C-17.

Desjardins called the C-17 the "backbone" of the air mobility fleet, and said the C-5's combination of long range, high capacity and capability to carry outsize cargo is unequaled. Together, she said, "they meet the needs for cargo and capacity anywhere in the world."

Retiring the least-capable C-5s would save about $320 million, Desjardins said.

"Making tradeoffs of two types of aircraft when we already have more than enough of both is not going be cost effective," McCord said.

Asked what the department would cut to accommodate any new C-17s, McCord said that would depend on how many new C-17s were bought. "You and Congress would decide that," he said, "because you would cut from our budget about $300 million for every C-17 added."

"We have a good mix right now," Estevez said. "Replacement is definitely not the most cost-effective way. Buying more to retire more is certainly not the way the department needs to balance its resources."

The defense secretary has made that case to Congress, and President Barack Obama has promised to veto any legislation that provides for more C-17s.

Wisconsin Air Guard to support gulf oil spill response efforts

Date: July 13, 2010

Four Airmen with the Wisconsin Air National Guard are expected to depart this week to support response operations in the Gulf of Mexico.

The Airmen - all noncommissioned officers - will work in an Air Force North secondary air operations center to manage the airspace in the area of the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill recovery effort. Three of the Airmen hail from the 128th Air Refueling Wing; Tech. Sgt. Jill Hofstetter, Reeseville is an air surveillance technician with the 128th Air Control Squadron, a position she's held the past two years. Prior to that, she served eight years in the active Air Force.

"This will be a change of pace," she explained while outprocessing at the 115th Fighter Wing. "It's been two years - I miss the active duty pace."

The Wisconsin Airmen will be among 57 National Guard members to staff the command center. Those Guard members will include pilots, navigators, air battle managers and air traffic controllers, and intelligence. The duty is expected to last up to 120 days. According to Maj. David May, deputy director of operations for the Wisconsin National Guard joint staff, additional Airmen from Wisconsin may be called upon to support this mission. While these would be the first Guard members from Wisconsin to assist in the gulf oil spill recovery operations, National Guard Soldiers and Airmen from the gulf states and others have been on active state duty to help combat the oil spill since early May.

USS Chafee Returns to Pearl Harbor

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Robert Stirrup, Commander, Navy Region Hawaii Public Affairs

PEARL HARBOR (NNS) -- More than 250 Sailors aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Chafee (DDG 90) returned to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH) after a three-month deployment in the Western Pacific July 12.

Chafee departed JBPHH April 5 for an independent deployment, operating in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility.

"This was a very productive deployment," said Cmdr. Chase Patrick, commanding officer of Chafee. "We never had a bad day at sea, we had a lot of fun and we got a lot of work accomplished."

While on deployment, Chafee took part in Exercise Malabar 2010, a week-long bilateral military exercise hosted by the Indian Navy to promote the interoperability between the United States and India.

Chafee also participated in operations supporting Commander Task Force 70 and trained alongside the Malaysian Navy.

Patrick spoke about how well the crew performed during the deployment.

"The crew performed great. They were very proficient from the navigation detail down to the engineers," said Patrick. "They did their jobs exceedingly well."

Friends and families were excited to see their Sailors return home as they waited at the pier.

Guided-missile destroyers are multimission surface combatants, capable of anti-air warfare, anti-submarine warfare and anti-surface warfare missions. They operate independently for support of carrier and expeditionary strike groups.

Third-Generation Officer Takes Oath

By Air Force Senior Airman William A. O'Brien
Joint Task Force 435

July 13, 2010 - One of the Navy's newest officers joined the ranks in a unique way July 9 when he received his commissioning oath via video teleconference from his uncle, a Navy vice admiral who commands a joint task force in Afghanistan. The commissioning of Ensign Ian Kriegish by Vice Adm. Robert S. Harward, Joint Task Force 435 commander, marked the beginning of the third generation of his family to serve as an officer in the Navy.

"We are all very proud of you -- proud of you for what you're doing," Harward told his nephew. "You're taking on this obligation when we're at war, and you'll serve while we're at war. There's no greater purpose that you could have in life, so go out and serve the fleet well."

Harward introduced Kriegish to the Navy. As a recent honors graduate from Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., Kriegish was undecided about his future. But a visit to his uncle's home in Norfolk, Va., changed that.

"When he was visiting me in Norfolk, he didn't know what he wanted to do," Harward said. "I live near the [aircraft] carrier, so we just walked over and walked on some of the ships. We talked to some young kids who were just junior officers. He decided that joining seemed interesting, so he applied."

After finding out that he had aced the entry test and had been accepted to become an intelligence officer, Kriegish began Officer Candidate School.

"When he applied, he wanted intel, so he was excited to be accepted by them and to have that be what he's going to do for the next few years," Harward said.

After receiving his commission, Kriegish was congratulated by his attending family and his video-teleconferencing uncle. "Congratulations, Ensign Kriegish," the admiral said. "I just wish I could be there to be your first salute."

After a small talk with the family, Harward offered a parting, "Go get 'em, Ensign Kriegish," as he sent his nephew to join the fleet.

Joint Task Force 435 assumed responsibility for U.S. detention operations -- including the care and custody of detainees at the detention facility in Parwan -- oversight of detainee review processes, programs for the peaceful reintegration of detainees into society, and coordination with other agencies and partners for the promotion of the rule of law in Afghanistan.

AF attends International Bowl Expo

Air Force Personnel Center Public Affairs

LAS VEGAS – Air Force bowling representatives learned marketing tips and how to make Air Force bowling centers more innovative during the recent Military Training Program at the 2010 International Bowl Expo here.

According to Air Force Services Agency officials, the annual expo brings together bowling professionals from around the world to collaborate and share ideas. The Air Force also provides hands-on training, certifications and educational seminars for bowling managers and coaches.

Educational topics included technology, marketing/promotions, best practices, food and beverage operations, pro shop operations, entertainment income, business planning and coaching. The expo showcased new products and recreational simulators Air Force bowling managers can introduce to their bowling centers.

“This is the one time of year when the entire industry comes together to network and share ideas,” said Don Freund, Air Force bowling program manager. “There are several ideas we can take from industry experts that open our minds on how we can better serve our Airmen and families.”

According to Mr. Freund, training was successful. The majority of attendees took interest in an advanced management course that focused on marketing and demographics. By the end of the course, bowling managers developed extensive summer plans to be implemented at their installations.

“We will continue to focus on program development, center operations and work closely with the industry experts to improve management education to benefit Airmen and their families,” Mr. Freund said.

Bowling centers already offer Airmen and families programs such as:

Hook up the Bowling: A new player development course taught by a U.S. Bowling Congress-certified coach that teaches novice bowlers the basics in the sport, bowling courtesy and rules of the game. Students leave the course with their own bowling ball and bag. Interested participants should check with their local bowling center to sign up for a class.

Summer program/specials: Every bowling center that registers receives support from the Air Force Services Agency to develop summer programs to support the wants and needs of their community. Customers can find anything from open play specials, summer leagues and/or summer youth camps. Most of these programs include bowler incentives that reward the player for participation.

For more information on what individual bowling centers offer, visit local Force Support Squadron “FSS.com” websites or visit the U.S. Air Force Services website at www.usafservices.com.

DOD Announces Recruiting and Retention Numbers for June 2010

The Department of Defense announced today its recruiting and retention statistics for the active and reserve components for June 2010.

Active Component.

Recruiting. All four active services met or exceeded their accession goals for June 2010.

• Army – 7,438 accessions with a goal of 7,328; 102 percent

• Navy – 3,209 accessions with a goal of 3,209; 100 percent

• Marine Corps – 4,048 accessions with a goal of 4,046; 100 percent

• Air Force – 1,935 accessions with a goal of 1,931; 100 percent

Retention. Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force retention are at or above the fiscal year-to-date goals for the first nine months of the year.

Reserve Component.

Recruiting. Four of the six reserve components exceeded their accession goals for June 2010. Both the Army and Air National Guard intentionally slowed June accessions because they are exceeding their fiscal year-to-date recruiting goal.

• Army National Guard – 4,544 accessions with a goal of 4,825; 94 percent

• Army Reserve – 1,865 accessions with a goal of 1,690; 110 percent

• Navy Reserve – 694 accessions with a goal of 694; 100 percent

• Marine Corps Reserve – 1,296 accessions with a goal of 1,183; 110 percent

• Air National Guard – 501 accessions with a goal of 507; 99 percent

• Air Force Reserve – 778 accessions with a goal of 754; 103 percent

Attrition. Losses in all reserve components are within acceptable limits.

Detailed information on specific recruiting data can be obtained by contacting the individual military recruiting commands at 502-626-0164 for Army, 210-565-4678 for Air Force, 703-784-9454 for Marine Corps and 901-874-9049 for Navy. The reserve components can be reached at the following numbers: National Guard Bureau 703-607-2586; Army Reserve 404-464-8490; Air Force Reserve 703-697-1761; Navy Reserve 757-322-5652; and Marine Corps Reserve 504-678-6535.

F-22 Raptor rolls out in Hawaii

by Tech Sgt. Cohen A. YoungDefense Media Activity - Hawaii News Bureau

7/12/2010 - JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM, Hawaii (AFNS) -- Top military and local community leaders gathered here July 9 for a dedication service for the F-22 Raptor.

Hundreds of onlookers gathered with members of the 199th Fighter Squadron, 154th Wing, Hawaii Air National Guard and people from Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to welcome the F-22, a fifth generation fighter, which replaces the F-15 Eagle that the squadron has flown since 1987. The 199th FS is the first guard unit to receive the F-22.

"The 199th (FS members prove) that National Guard forces are capable of maintaining a strategic presence with its active duty association and providing a great value to our nation and the state of Hawaii," said Gen. Craig R. McKinley, the chief of the National Guard Bureau.

The F-22, a single-seat, twin engine aircraft that utilizes stealth technology, was originally designed primarily as an air superiority fighter.

"These F-22 Raptors are the state of the art air superiority fighter and couldn't be located at a better place," General McKinley said.

Many of the guard members will serve as the lead in a "total force" concept that is already in use at JB Hickam. The 19th FS, 15th Air Wing will fly and help maintain the F-22s that bring a new capability to the HIANG, as well as the Air Force.

"The Air Force is a seamless total force. Along with our Air Force Reserve and civilians, the National Guard and our active duty component form a very severe fighting force that can get the job done," Gen. McKinley said.

Final MC-12 deployed to USCENTCOM AOR

by Master Sgt. Russell Petcoff
Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs

7/12/2010 - WASHINGTON (AFNS) -- The 30th MC-12 Liberty was recently deployed to the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility completing the initial deployment plan, an Air Force official announced July 9.

"We mobilized a significant industry base and every resource at our disposal, and delivered the first Federal Aviation Administration-certified aircraft in six months and three weeks," said Lt. Gen. David A. Deptula, the deputy chief of staff for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance at Headquarters Air Force. "It began flying combat sorties in less than eight months."

"This was an extraordinary team effort by a hand-picked, incredibly dedicated industry and Air Force team," General Deptula said. "The MC-12W is the fastest weapons system delivered from concept to combat since the P-51 Mustang in World War II."

The MC-12W is a medium- to low-altitude, twin-engine turboprop aircraft. Its primary mission is providing ISR support directly to ground forces.

The aircraft has had a positive impact in the AOR, General Deptula said. It has assisted in the capture of hundreds of insurgents, and the discovery of weapons caches and improvised explosive devices.

The MC-12 fleet has flown more than 5,000 combat sorties and taken more than 22,000 hours of full-motion video and more than 40,000 images to date.

"This project is an unqualified success, and the model for how we should develop and deliver quick-reaction ISR capabilities," General Deptula said.

The aircraft are military versions of the Hawker Beechcraft Super King Air 350 and Super King 350ER. They are equipped with an electro-optical infrared sensor, and other sensors as the mission requires. The EO/IR sensor also includes a laser illuminator and designator in a single sensor package. A fully operational system consists of a modified aircraft with sensors, a ground exploitation cell, line-of-sight and satellite communications data-links, and a robust voice communications suite.

The MC-12 capability supports all aspects of the Air Force Irregular Warfare mission -- counter insurgency, foreign internal defense and building partnership capacity -- and is capable of worldwide operations.

In April 2008, Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates established a Department of Defense-wide ISR Task Force to identify and recommend solutions for increased ISR in the CENTCOM AOR. Secretary Gates tasked Air Force officials July 1, 2008, to acquire 37 "C-12" class aircraft to augment unmanned systems. It was less than eight months from funding approval to the delivery of the first aircraft in theater.

"The entire Project Liberty team worked seamlessly to get this airborne ISR capability to the AOR as quickly as possible," said Lt. Gen Craig Koziol, the DOD ISR Task Force director. "From concept to all the sensor integration efforts required to get this platform deployed, the team demonstrated superb focus to get this quick reaction, airborne ISR capability fielded to support (Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom)."

The entire operational fleet of 30 aircraft was deployed in only 13 months.

Iwo Jima Deploys in Support of Continuing Promise

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Morgan E. Dial, USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) departed Naval Station Norfolk July 12 in support of Continuing Promise 2010 (CP10).

Continuing Promise is an annual humanitarian civic assistance operation that provides opportunities to establish new partnerships with other nations, non-government organizations (NGOs), international government organizations and learn from host nations and civilian experts.

During the scheduled four-month surge, relief operations will be conducted in Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Panama and Suriname.

CP10 is a U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) directed operation implemented by U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F).

There are more than 1,600 Sailors, Marines, Soldiers, Airmen and civilians including Commander Amphibious Squadron 6, Fleet Surgical Team 2, Navy Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202, Maritime Civil Affairs Team 206, Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force (SPMAGTF), CLR-25 Medical Detachment and contingents of medical personnel from the armed forces of The Netherlands, Canada and Germany and various other satellite commands embarked on board Iwo Jima.

Iwo Jima's medical team will work alongside Central American, South American and Caribbean medical teams as well as NGOs. Together, the teams are capable of providing general surgical care, primary and consultative care, ophthalmologic services, optometric services, preventative and environmental health, dental screenings and treatment, public health training and veterinary services.

"Iwo Jima has the optimal blend of medical, surgical and dental capabilities," said Capt. Michael T. Hopkins, Iwo Jima's senior medical officer. "In addition, we have more capability to transport people and supplies from the flight deck and well deck than the USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) during their deployments."

Seabees from CBMU 202 in Norfolk will be supporting the civic action programs along with detachments from Jacksonville and Key West, Fla., and Kings Bay, Ga. They will provide local communities with building repairs and improvements, new small construction projects, utility system repairs and other projects depending on the host nation's needs.

SPMAGTF will also provide medical and engineering support to this humanitarian civic assistance by conducting subject matter expert exchanges with specified partner nations. In addition, they will provide air and ground transportation for nearly all of the medical, engineering and community relation sites.

"I am so very proud of this crew. Since I took command in 2008, all tasks that have been put in front of them, they have simply knocked them out of the park," said Capt. Jeff Amick, Iwo Jima commanding officer. "These great Americans have exceeded every expectation throughout a very challenging year and a half. I am extremely confident that this humanitarian mission is going to really showcase this ship, these Sailors and Marines and our Navy's ability to respond to any situation when tasked. This crew is ready to respond and could not be more ready to deliver."

COMUSNAVSO is the naval component command for USSOUTHCOM and is responsible for all Naval personnel and assets in the area of responsibility.

COMUSNAVSO conducts a variety of missions in support of the U.S. Maritime Strategy, including theater security cooperation, relationship building, humanitarian assistance and disaster response, community relations and counter-illicit trafficking operations.

Milwaukee-based security forces Airmen prepare to deploy

Date: July 12, 2010
By Senior Airman Ryan Kuntze
128th Air Refueling Wing

Seventeen Airmen assigned to the Wisconsin Air National Guard's 128th Air Refueling Wing Security Forces Squadron have completed combat skills training at Fort Dix, N.J. The training is part of a 180-day deployment to the Transit Center at Manas, where the members will provide air base security for the 376th Air Expeditionary Wing.

The Airmen received a send-off June 23 from their families, Wing senior leadership officials and other security forces team members at Sijan Hall. Four members have already left for the Transit Center at Manas, while the remaining members will deploy later this month.

"I'm proud of them for being willing to go again," said Maj. Glenn Evenson, the 128th Air Refueling Wing security forces' commander.

Evenson's comment underscores the volunteer status of the team members.

Security forces team members are able to sign up for deployments, rather being ordered to go overseas, according to Master Sgt. Mark Warner, the 128th Security Forces Squadron training manager.

"This is what we do," Warner said.

The 128th Air Refueling Wing family support office is prepared to help the family members who stay behind while their loved ones go overseas.

"It's a challenging time for families," said Elaine Schachelmayer, the Airman and Family Program manager. "I just want to remind [the families] that we're here. We'll walk the walk with them."

The security forces team members spent approximately one month at Fort Dix to complete their combat skills training prior to deploying overseas. Combat skills training is a mandatory program for all service members, designed to reinforce war fighting skills, teach battlefield first aid techniques and hone necessary attributes for enduring a lengthy stay in hostile environments.