Military News

Thursday, September 18, 2008

By Army Staff Sgt. Michael J. Carden
American Forces Press Service

Sept. 18, 2008 - A
military's most valuable resources are its people and the experienced leaders who mentor and train them, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff told senior noncommissioned officers here today during a visit to the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy. "You are serving in an extraordinary time in our country's history," Navy Adm. Mike Mullen said. "Right now [the military has] the best soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines we've ever had, and it's that way, in great part, because of your service."

Mullen spoke to a group of nearly 700 of the U.S. military's top enlisted troops, congratulating them for being selected to attend the academy and thanking them for their service. He commended them for the
leadership and the knowledge they represent.

Because of the high tempo of today's
military, Mullen said it's important for the more-seasoned troops to focus on leadership, mentoring and sharing their experiences with new and junior recruits. Although the individual servicemember is the military's number one asset, the chairman said they're no good without strong leadership.

The admiral also praised the families for their support. The pace of deployment rotations may be hard on the spouses and children, he said, but their positive support allows the troops to focus on their mission.

"We have the most combat-hardened, most capable, fastest changing military that I've ever seen," he said, "and we could not do that without the support of our family."

In fact, Mullen gives
military families much credit for the past year's success in Iraq. Violence there is at its lowest levels in nearly five years. Iraqi forces have grown more competent and self-sufficient, and some U.S. units have already redeployed without replacements.

"Family support has never been better," he said. "We've been unbelievably successful in Iraq. The change from a year ago is absolutely spectacular. [Success in Iraq] is still reversible, and it's still fragile, but the families made that possible."

Mullen concluded his visit with the academy by reiterating the importance of
leadership in today's force and senior leaders to pass on their experiences to troops as they progress through the ranks.

"
leadership is the most important part of your job as senior non-commissioned officers," he said. "You are a key group for our future, and our future rests on your shoulders."

Gates Urges NATO Unity on Russia Problem

By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service

Sept. 18, 2008 - NATO must take a middle ground in response to Russia's actions against Georgia, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates told American and British reporters before attending a NATO meeting here today . Various NATO member states have urged different courses of action to punish Russia for its invasion of Georgia – a nation with NATO aspirations. Generally, NATO members in Eastern Europe and on the Baltic Sea want stronger sanctions than nations farther west.

"I think there is a middle ground, in which I suggest where we do some prudent things that are consistent with the kinds of activities NATO has been engaged in for 60 years in terms of planning, in terms of exercises and so on," Gates said. These signals are not provocative and don't tend to draw any firm lines or send signals that are unwanted, he said.

"At the same time, it sends some reassurance to the allies in Eastern Europe and the Baltic states that we're mindful of their concerns," he said.

Gates said he does not fear a direct
military challenge from Russia. "It's hard for me to imagine that those who are currently in NATO feel a real military threat coming from Russia," he said. "To the degree there is a sense of concern, my guess is that it has more to do with pressure and intimidation than a prospect of any military action."

NATO must continue to subscribe to the territorial integrity of Georgia, Gates said. "I think what has been important here is the unity of the United States and Europe in addressing what Russia has done," he said. He praised French President Nicolas Sarkozy's
leadership, calling it "very constructive and very positive."

The meeting Gates will attend will focus on the transformation of NATO. He will be discussing continued development of expeditionary capabilities for the alliance, more necessary capabilities such as airlift, and the reform of NATO headquarters.

Gates also addressed the status-of-forces negotiations with Iraq during the roundtable. He said the American negotiation team is back in Baghdad and has some ideas that should satisfy Iraqi concerns. The Iraqi government is concerned about jurisdiction and detainee issues. The United Nations authorization for U.S. forces in Iraq runs out Dec. 31, and the United States and Iraq must agree on a follow-on plan.

Finally, Gates said the United States is keeping a wary eye on North Korea following reports that its leader, Kim Jong Il, is seriously ill.

"We are watching it very closely," he said. "We are concerned about instability. I think all of North Korea's neighbors are concerned about instability, in no small part because of the possibility of large flows of refugees. We are looking at that, but at this point it's not entirely clear how seriously ill he is, or what the circumstances are. We, with our friends, are just watching at this point."

Chairman Notes Air Force's 61st Birthday

American Forces Press Service

Sept. 18, 2008 -
Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, issued the following message to the nation's airmen to commemorate the United States Air Force's 61st birthday today: Leonardo DaVinci said, "Once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward." When it comes to flying and fighting, no one knows this more ... nor does it better ... than the United States Air Force.

On this, your 61st birthday, we pause to say thanks to all Active Duty, National Guard, Reserve and Civilian Airmen who are always looking up – and looking out – to protect America in the great spaces of the sky. Every day air, space and missile crews ... security, medical and mission support forces ... constantly stand freedom's watch.

Airmen like you and your families serve a cause greater than yourselves ... you make all the difference. When Americans look up, they see thousands of contrails carrying freedom and hope across the globe. And when Americans look up, they see the greatest
United States Air Force the world has ever known!

On behalf of the Joint Chiefs, and every man and woman in uniform, I offer my gratitude and congratulations to you and your families. Happy birthday!

MILITARY CONTRACTS September 18, 2008

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

SupplyCore, Inc., Rockford, Ill. is being awarded a maximum $525,000,000 fixed price with economic price adjustment, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contract for Maintenance, Repair and Operation for Supplies. There are no other locations of performance. Using services are
Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, federal civilian agencies and Defense Logistics Agency. This proposal was originally Web solicited with 11 responses. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Sept. 18, 2009. The contracting activity is Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM500-02-D-0122).

Valero Marketing & Supply Co.,
San Antonio, Texas is being awarded a maximum $381,048,496 fixed price with economic price adjustment, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contract for aviation fuel. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Defense Energy Support Center. There were originally 69 proposals solicited with 16 responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Oct. 30, 2009. The contracting activity is Defense Energy Support Center, Fort Belvoir, Va., (SP0600-08-D-0502).

Tesoro Hawaii Corp., Kapolei, Hawaii is being awarded a maximum $198,914,133 fixed price with economic price adjustment, partial set-aside, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contract for aviation fuel. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Defense Energy Support Center. This proposal was originally Web solicited with 16 responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Oct. 30, 2009. The contracting activity is Defense Energy Support Center, Fort Belvoir, Va. (SP0600-08-D-0512).

Petro Star Inc., Anchorage, Ala., is being awarded a maximum $158,669,053 fixed price with economic price adjustment, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity for aviation fuel. Other location of performance is Valdez, Ala. Using service is Defense Energy Support Center. There were originally 69 proposals solicited with 16 responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Oct. 30, 2009. The contracting activity is Defense Energy Support Center, Fort Belvoir, Va., (SP0600-08-D-0507).

U.S. Oil Trading LLC, Tacoma, Wash., is being awarded a maximum $103,462,873 fixed price with economic price adjustment, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contract for aviation fuel. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Defense Energy Support Center. There were originally 69 proposals solicited with 16 responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Oct. 30, 2009. The contracting activity is Defense Energy Support Center, Fort Belvoir, Va., (SP0600-08-D-0501).

Chevron Global Aviation, Houston,
Texas is being awarded a maximum $87,998,492 fixed price with economic price adjustment, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contract for aviation fuel. Other location of performance is Salt Lake City, Utah. Using service is Defense Energy Support Center. There were originally 69 proposals solicited with 16 responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Oct. 30, 2009. The contracting activity is Defense Energy Support Center, Fort Belvoir, Va., (SP0600-08-D-0505).

Sinclair Oil Corp., Salt Lake City, Utah is being awarded a maximum $59,710,349 fixed price with economic price adjustment, partial set-aside, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contract for jet fuel. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Defense Energy Support Center. This proposal was originally Web solicited with 16 responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Oct. 31, 2009. The contracting activity is Defense Energy Support Center, Fort Belvoir, Va. (SP0600-08-D-0511).

Sargent & Greenleaf, Inc., Nicholasville, Ky., is being awarded a maximum $25,000,000 fixed price with economic price adjustment, indefinite quantity contract for high security padlocks. There are no other locations of performance. Using services are
Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and federal civilian agencies. This proposal was originally Web solicited with one response. This contract has two year base period and three one-year option periods. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Sept. 17, 2010. The contracting activity is Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa. (SPM5L5-08-D-0264).

ConocoPhillips, Bartlesville, Okla., is being awarded a maximum $7,121,381 fixed price with economic price adjustment, partial set-aside, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contract for jet fuel. Other location of performance is Commerce City, Colo. Using service is Defense Energy Support Center. This proposal was originally Web solicited with 16 responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Oct. 30, 2008. The contracting activity is Defense Energy Support Center, Fort Belvoir, Va. (SP0600-08-D-0509).

Caterpillar Inc., Mossville, Ind., is being awarded a maximum $6,681,190 firm fixed price contract for backhoe loaders. Other location of performance is N.C. Using service is
Marine Corps. There were originally four proposals solicited with three responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal years. The date of performance completion is Apr. 24, 2009. The contracting activity is Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM500-01-D-0059-0215).

Air Force

AAR Manufacturing, Inc., DBA AAR Mobility Systems, of Cadillac, Mich., is being awarded a firm fixed price contract for a maximum of $137,959,200. This action will provide depot-level repair of 463L pallets. A maximum quantity for 120,000 each for the two year basic plus three option years with a maximum quantity of 60,000 each per year. At this time no funds have been obligated. 642 CBSG/GBKBA, Robins AFB, Ga., is the contracting activity (FA8519-08-D-0008).

The
Air Force is modifying a cost plus award fee contract with Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co., of Littleton, Colo., not to exceed $30.7 million. The purpose of this modification is to provide a program for the development and implementation of a Global Position System metric tracking to include a detailed program acquisition/execution plan and Integration Master Schedule supporting a Sept. 2011 IOC (Atlas configurations) and 2012 (Delta configuration) availability. Identified milestones will be evaluated at the time the individual Statements of work are resubmitted. This is an initial study that will lay the foundation for the actual development of the launch requirements. At this time $17,320,801 has been obligated. Space and Missile Systems Center, Space Launch and Range Systems Material Wing, El Segundo, Calif., is the contracting activity (FA8816-06-C-0002, P00097).

The
Air Force is modifying a cost plus fixed fee contract with Boeing Launch Services of Huntington Beach, Calif., for $6,279,686. Launch Services for NASA Kepler mission. This contractor will plan, organize, control, integrate, and execute the Medium Launch Vehicle (MLV) III program to meet the requirements, as defined in the MLV III Statement of Work and Kepler SOW. At this time all funds have been obligated. Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC), Launch and Range Systems Wing, Los Angeles AFB, El Segundo, Calif., is the contracting activity (F04701-93-C-0004, P00377).

Wyle Laboratories, Inc., of Huntsville, Ala., is being awarded a cost plus fixed fee contract for an estimated $38,647,319. This contract action is for the Reliability Information Analysis Center to research, develop, review, and evaluate data lists and technical data packages as well as develop specialized prototypes of integrated avionics, Integrated Weapon Systems, and aircraft platform systems/subsystems. At this time $289,855 has been obligated. 55th Contracting Squadron, 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt AFB, Neb., is the contracting activity (HC1047-05-D-4005, DO: 0080).

The
Air Force is modifying a firm fixed price contract with the Boeing Co., Integrated Defense System, of Wichita, Kan., for an estimated $35,660,000. This modification is to provide additional contract funding in support of the fourth year of a five-year Contractor Logistics Support contract for the VC-25A aircraft. 727 ACSG/PKB, Tinker AFB, Okla., is the contracting activity (FA8106-04-C-0006 / P00086).

Honeywell
Technology Solutions Inc., of Colorado Springs, Colo., is being awarded a firm fixed price contract for $29,772,521. This delivery order will procure the Transportable Remote Tracking Station, part of the Satellite Contact Network. The Transportable will be designed to operate in three scenarios: 1) a stand-alone satellite tracking station that can completely replace a fixed site tracking station; 2) a stand-alone antenna subsystem that can replace a fixed site's antenna (only); and 3) a stand-alone computer electronics subsystem that can replace a fixed site's computer electronics suite (only). This ability to split the Transportable into separate stand-alone parts will give the Air Force the flexibility to fix specific problems at specific satellite tracking sites simultaneously. The Transportable will also be used to provide extra satellite communications support in "hot spots" around the world without having to build costly permanent satellite tracking sites. At this time $16,375,782 has been obligated. Space and Missile Systems Center Satellite Control Network Group/PK, El Segundo, Calif., is the contracting activity (F04701-02-D-0006; DO: 0127).S

Navy

Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corp.,
San Francisco, Calif., is being awarded a cost plus fixed fee contract for Naval Nuclear Propulsion work. This contract includes options which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to an estimated $9,723,700,000. Work will be performed in Schenectady, N.Y. (30 percent); Idaho Falls, Idaho, (15 percent); and Pittsburgh, Pa., (55 percent). Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured with three offers received via the U.S. Department of Energy's Industry Interactive Procurement System. No work completion date or additional information is provided on Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program contracts. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington Navy Yard, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00024-08-C-2103).

Parsons Infrastructure &
Technology Group, Inc., Pasadena, Calif., is being awarded $59,923,547 for firm-fixed price task order #WE01 under a previously awarded multiple award Seaport-e contract for engineering and program support for Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC), Mid-Atlantic. The work to be performed provides for technical, project management and data management support services to the Capital Improvements Business Line Government workforce at NAVFAC Mid-Atlantic. Work will be performed in Va., (70 percent) and N.C., (30 percent), and is expected to be completed by Sept. 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Five proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (N00178-05-D-4487).

DCK Pacific Guam, LLC, Barrigada, Guam, is being awarded a $15,399,603 firm fixed price contract for repair and alteration of existing facilities to administrative offices for the Joint Region Marianas Headquarters at Nimitz Hill. The work to be performed provides for the repair and alteration of existing reinforced concrete facilities to administrative offices for the Joint Region Marianas Headquarters. Work includes repair and alteration of administrative buildings and a generator building. The facilities will include administrative spaces, operations center, and conference rooms for approximately 300 personnel. The contract also contains one option, which if exercised, would increase cumulative contract value to $18,649,630. Work will be performed in Nimitz Hill, Guam, and is expected to be completed by Mar. 2010. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the
Navy Electronic Commerce Online website, with three proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Marianas, Guam, is the contracting activity (N40192-08-C-1316).

McDonnell Douglas Corp., St. Louis, Mo., is being awarded a $14,580,005 ceiling-priced delivery order contract for spares in support of the E/A-18 G Growler aircraft. Work will be performed at St. Louis, Mo., and work is expected to be completed by Mar. 2011. The contract funds will not expire before the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Inventory Control Point is the contracting activity.

McDonnell Douglas Corp., St. Louis, Mo., is being awarded a $13,000,000 ceiling priced modification to delivery order #0004 under previously awarded contract (N00383-06-D-001J) for support equipment and engineering support for the E/A-18 G Growler aircraft. Work will be performed at St. Louis, Mo., and work is expected to be completed by Apr. 2010. Contract funds will not expire before the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Inventory Control Point is the contracting activity.

Northrop Grumman Corp., Integrated Systems Western Region, San Diego, Calif., is being awarded a $12,629,951 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus fixed fee contract (N00019-05-C-0057) for operations and maintenance support for the Global Hawk Maritime Demonstration (GHMD), including operation and sustainment, logistics support and sustaining engineering throughout the demonstration. Work will be performed in Patuxent River, Md., (90 percent) and San Diego, Calif., (10 percent), and is expected to be completed in Sept. 2009. Contract funds in the amount of $12,629,951 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

J. Kokolakis Contracting, Inc., Rocky Point, N.Y., is being awarded an $11,412,000 firm-fixed-price construction contract for renovations at U. S. Merchant Marine Academy, Kings Point. The work to be performed provides for the renovation of Murphy Hall, a three-story dormitory, and includes demolition and replacement of all interior finishes, mechanical, plumbing, electrical, intercommunication and
fire protection systems. The work will be performed in Nassau County, N.Y., and is expected to be completed by Sept. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website with three proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (N40085-08-C-2103).

Goodrich ISR Systems (formally Recon/Optical Inc.) Barrington, Ill., is being awarded a $10,350,998 firm-fixed-price contract for seven CA-247 cameras to be deployed in Iraq. The existing camera system, CA-247 is currently being tested and is scheduled to transition to the
Marine Corps in Sept. 2008. The development of the CA-247 camera was to develop special optics, special housings, and special software in support of adapting their current line of barrel sensors to the sensor with appropriate imaging capabilities and an appropriately large field of view to be capable of wide area persistent surveillance. Work will be performed in Barrington, Ill., and work is expected to be completed in Sept. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was procured under an other than full and open competition. The Naval Research Laboratory, Washington D.C., is the contracting activity (N00173-08-C-2134).

JKT/PCL, A Tribal 8(A) Joint Venture*, Bellevue, Wash., is being awarded a $10,281,916 firm fixed price contract for design and construction of a new Fleet Region Readiness Center at Naval Station Everett. The work to be performed provides for construction of a new facility, renovation of administrative support spaces in building 2000, and a new parking lot. The new facility will include instructor offices, classrooms, laboratories, and support spaces. Work will be performed in Everett, Wash., and is expected to be completed by Mar. 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured, limited to eligible eight (a) firms located in Small Business Administration Region X, via the
Navy Electronic Commerce Online website, with four proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Northwest, Silverdale, Wash., is the contracting activity (N44255-08-C-6008).

Databuoy, LLC*, Vienna, Va., is being awarded a $10,000,000 ceiling amount, indefinite delivery indefinite-quantity contract for a Phase III Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract under Small Business
Technology Transfer Topic N06-T004 for Embedded Systems Command and Control (EC2) low-power, self-exploiting, netted sensor capability utilizing a collaborative network of sensor components. Work will be performed in Vienna, Va., and is expected to be completed in Sept. 2013. Contract funds in the amount of $4,344,970 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This SBIR Phase III contract was not competitively procured, pursuant to FAR 6.302-5. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity (N00421-08-D-0012).

Bell-Boeing Joint Program Office, Amarillo,
Texas, is being awarded a $9,751,814 not-to-exceed modification to a previously awarded cost plus incentive fee contract (N00019-03-C-0067) to exercise an option for interim contractor support for the CV-22 operational flight at Hurlburt Field, Ft. Walton Beach, Fla., and potential deployed locations. This modification also provides for operational training support at Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M. Work will be performed at Hurlburt Air Force Base, Fort Walton Beach, Fla., (60 percent) and Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, N.M., (40 percent), and is expected to be completed in Jan. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Miss., is being awarded an $8,571,775 modification on a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N00019-08-C-0019), to exercise an option for the Phase II study and analysis to develop innovative solutions to be used in mission requirements for the Affordable Weapons System (AWS). This weapon system is being designed to fill a sea-based land attack and strike mission, to operate from ships, with potential for a sea-based
Navy and Marine Corps aircraft launch capability. Work will be performed in St. Louis, Miss., and is expected to be completed in Sept. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

Furniture By Thurston *, Grass Valley, Calif., is being awarded a $6,353,483 firm fixed price supply contract for furnishing and installing furniture under the Whole Room Furniture Concept in nine barracks located throughout
Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif. Work will be performed in Camp Pendleton, Calif., and work is expected to be completed Jan 2009. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Request For Quote was sent to the contractors listed under the Fleet Industrial Supply Center, Norfolk, Va., Blanket Purchase Agreement for Barracks Furniture. USMC Regional Contracting Office Southwest, Marine Corps Installations West, Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif., is the contracting activity (N00189-07-A-0058) (NG-01).

Digital Sandbox Inc.,* McLean, Va., is being awarded a $5,707,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, firm-fixed-price contract for systems architecture, model refinement, data gathering, analysis and processing validation and verification. Work will be performed in Washington, D.C., and is expected to be completed by Sept. 2009. Contractfunds in the amount of$1,400,000willexpire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively awarded. Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, Charleston, S.C., is the contracting activity (N65236-08-D-6019).

Sauer Incorporated, Jacksonville, Fla., is being awarded $5,622,420 for firm-fixed price task order #0005 to build a new conference center at the Naval Air Station, Patuxent River. The work to be performed provides for a full service restaurant and three ballrooms each with projection systems, pull down screens, internet connectivity and video teleconference capabilities. Work will be performed at Patuxent River, and is expected to be completed by September 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Four proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Washington, Public Works Department, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity (N62477-04-D-0036).

Army

BAE Systems National Security Solutions, Burlington, Mass., was awarded on Sept. 16, 2008, a $7,165,136 cost plus fixed fee price contract. The objective of this work is to develop an analyst exploitation tool to rapidly search through video archives based on content. Work will be performed in Burlington, Mass., Cambridge, Mass., and Los Angeles, Calif., with an estimated completion date of Mar. 16, 2010. Bids were solicited via Broad Agency Announcement and twenty bids were received. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Arlington, Va., is the contracting activity (HR0011-08-C-0134).

General Atomics Aeronautical System, San Diego, Calif., was awarded on Sept. 17, 2008, a $37,158,705 cost plus incentive fee price contract for incremental funding for systems development and demonstration (including integration of the Hellfire Missile) for the extended range multi-purpose unmanned aerial vehicle. Work will be performed in San Diego, Calif., Adelanto, Calif., Palmdale, Calif., Salt Lake City, Utah, Hunt Valley, Md., and Huntsville, Ala., with an estimated completion date of Aug. 31, 2009. One hundred and twenty bids were solicited and three bids were received. U.S.
Army Aviation and Missile Command, Arsenal Redstone, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-05-C-0069).

Cazador, Anchorage, Ala., was awarded on Sept. 17, 2008, $11,768,865 firm fixed fee price contract. The project provides for purchase and installation of furniture in the Sustainability Centers of Excellence, Fort Lee, Va. Work will be performed in Fort Lee, Va., with an estimated completion date of Mar. 30, 2009. One bid was solicited and one bid was received. U.S.
Army Engineering District, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (W91236-08-C-0063).

ECC International LLA, (ECCI), Burlingame Calif., was awarded on Sept. 17, 2008, a $7,950,041 firm fixed price contract. The project consists of the design & construction of the Counter Narcotics Police of Afghanistan Forwarding Operating Base. Work will be performed in Heart, Afghanistan, with an estimated completion date of Oct. 30, 2009. Bids were solicited via the Web and three bids were received. U.S.
Army Engineering District, Afghanistan, is the contracting activity (W917PM-07-D-0015).

American Science & Engineering, Billerica, Mass., was awarded on Sept. 16, 2008, a $22,123,830 firm fixed price contract for maintenance and sustainment for vehicle and Cargo Inspection Systems located in Southwest Asia. Work will be performed in Southwest Asia, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 27, 2011. One bid was solicited and one bid was received. TACOM-Rock Island, Rock Island, Ill., is the contracting activity (W52H09-08D-0393).

Whiting Turner, Baltimore, Md., was awarded on Sept. 17, 2008, $19,773,000 firm fixed fee price contract Co., Operations Facility (COF), Fort Eustis, Va., Design & Construct a standard unit operations facility. The project includes a (COF), classrooms, arms vault, nuclear, biological and chemical equipment storage. Work will be performed in Fort Lee, Va., with an estimated completion date of Aug. 1, 2011. Three bids were solicited and two bids were received. U.S.
Army Engineering District, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (W91236-08-D-0069).

America Supports You: Group Helps Military Children Cope with Deployments

By Samantha L. Quigley
American Forces Press Service

Sept. 18, 2008 - An organization in
California is working to help military infants and toddlers cope with the stresses of a parent's deployment unique to their age group. The mission of "Zero to Three" is to promote the health and development of infants and toddlers, said Lynette Fraga, the organization's director of military projects.

"'Coming Together Around
military Families' is an initiative to strengthen the resilience of young children and their families who are experiencing trauma, grief and loss that can result when a servicemember parent is deployed to Iraq ... or Afghanistan," Fraga said. "The purpose of this project is to increase awareness of parents and professionals about the impact of deployment, separation, trauma, grief, and loss on very young children."

The organization does this through training, resource and material development and by providing consultation to multi-disciplinary professionals who support families in
military communities and states with high deployment rates, she explained. In supporting military families, the military project shares what it knows about deployments, homecomings, psychological and physical injuries that servicemembers experience from a very young child's perspective.

"We know that early experiences matter," Fraga said. "We are committed to raising awareness, preparing professionals and stimulating research so that we continue to assist all children in reaching their full potential through even the most challenging times."

Zero to Three recently became a supporter of America Supports You, a Defense Department program connecting citizens and companies with servicemembers and their families serving at home and abroad.

"Our affiliation with America Supports You affords Zero to Three the opportunity, along with other respected organizations, to voice our support and commitment to
military families," Fraga said. "Connecting with other home-front groups provides the priceless networking opportunity to understand the work of others, their successes and challenges, and ultimately the opportunities for synergy as we all work to find successful, meaningful, and sustainable outcomes for the military families and young children we support."

Agencies Work Behind Scenes to Bring Home Missing Troops

By Fred W. Baker III
American Forces Press Service

Sept. 18, 2008 - Since the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have begun, thousands of American soldiers have been welcomed home with elaborate parades, gymnasiums packed with tearful spouses and children, and commanders proclaiming from podiums great deeds done in battle. Still others have had more tragic homecomings, instead returning in flag-draped coffins to grieving spouses and families; their ceremonies replaced with memorials held quietly in serene cemeteries across the country.

But 88,000 servicemembers from wars past are buried on foreign shores and at sea, servicemembers whose mothers and fathers, husbands, wives and children have had neither the pleasure nor the closure of any homecoming.

Quietly, behind the scenes of the current conflicts, hundreds of
military troops and civilians have gone about the business of bringing them home, one by one.

"We're probably the first nation since the Roman Empire to have soldiers in so many different places in the world," said Charles A. Ray, deputy assistant secretary of defense for prisoner of war and missing personnel affairs and a former U.S. ambassador to Cambodia.

Ray's office is charged with developing the policy and overseeing the efforts of the nearly 600 men and women in a handful of agencies across the country who work to research, recover and identify those who still are listed as missing from past wars.

In testimony before Congress this summer, Ray called their efforts the embodiment of the nation's commitment to those it sends into harm's way.

"If we can afford to take young and men and women and shove them out the door to go to war, we can afford to do what is necessary to bring them home and take care of them after they come back home," Ray said in an interview later at his office near the Pentagon.

"You ask people to sacrifice for their country," he said. "To me, that is a minimum payback for that sacrifice — not only on the part of the individuals, but for their families as well."

Ray is no stranger to the sacrifices of war. He served as a Special Forces soldier in combat. Coming out of his second combat tour in
Vietnam, Ray acknowledged, he was skeptical and had no expectation that the government would continue searching for those missing there, many of whom were his comrades.

In fact, it was nearly 10 years after the war in
Vietnam ended before the U.S. government would return to begin searching for the missing there. But now, as the head of the agency that leads the search, Ray said rapid advances in technology and sweeping changes on the international landscape have opened doors to recoveries and identifications that were closed before.

Former enemies have become allies. DNA testing, once deemed unreliable, has developed to become a key piece of evidence in nearly 85 percent of all missing troop identifications, Ray said. The United States, for the first time, is working on agreements to begin recovering the remains of servicemembers missing in countries such as India.

Navy Rear Adm. Donna L. Crisp, who commands the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, or JPAC, in Hawaii, called recent negotiations groundbreaking.

Crisp is working with the government of India to send recovery teams there, hopeful it will happen next year. And talks with China that were interrupted by the Olympics, she added, are going well to have recovery teams return there after five years.

"This mission, because it is so unique and so humanitarian, is accepted by nations for what we are doing," Crisp said. "Every nation that I have worked with has been very open and is willing to assist us."

The command's headquarters is based in the U.S. Pacific Command because that is where most of the servicemembers are missing and where nearly 80 percent of the organization's efforts are concentrated. Recovery teams have worked in Laos for more than 25 years and in
Vietnam for 20. Teams regularly are in Cambodia and are close to exhausting all leads there, Ray said.

Crisp recently met with South Korean officials to begin a mutual effort look for each other's lost servicemembers there. South Korea has 130,000 soldiers missing from the Korean War. The two agencies are exchanging scientists and information to aid the search.

No other country invests as heavily in servicemember recovery efforts as the United States, Ray and Crisp agreed. This has propelled DoD recovery technologies to the forefront internationally, leaving many countries eager to learn from their work.

The Armed Forces Identification DNA lab in Rockville, Md., is one of the oldest and largest labs in the world working with ancient DNA testing, or testing from severely degraded samples. It is the DNA testing lab for the JPAC, and it recently helped bring to a close a near century-old search for the remains of two children executed alongside the rest of the family of Russia's last czar.

Russian scientists also traveled to JPAC's central identification laboratory in Hawaii to study its use of skull identification using photographs. The JPAC has the world's largest skeletal
forensic lab.

The JPAC also is working to have a hydrographic ship scan the coastal waters of
Vietnam to identify places where planes may have gone down.

"It's just, basically, having an adventurous spirit and a scientific desire for discovery to do a better job that keeps us on the cutting edge," Crisp said.

Still, with all of the technological advances, nothing replaces traditional field work and science, she said.

On any given day, investigative and recovery teams are deployed in some of the most remote regions around the world. Their work takes the teams deep into jungles and to mountain tops. They work with local people for up to two months at a time taking on inhospitable living conditions, rough weather, poisonous snakes and insects and unexploded ordnance. Nine Americans have died in those missions.

"Nothing replaces digging," Crisp said. "We haven't found any magic to replace good old American know-how and hard work."

One of DoD's biggest challenges in recovering missing servicemembers is the fact that it is fighting the clock in many of the recoveries.

Nearly 78,000 still are missing from
World War Two, and JPAC's teams are working possible crash and burial sites that are more than 60 years old. Remains continue to deteriorate. Fields have grown over. Eyewitnesses and immediate family members have moved or died.

The JPAC is attempting to speed the time between recovery and identification of remains by expanding its size. Congress has approved a $100 million, 140,000-square-foot facility that will triple its current lab size. Construction is scheduled for 2010. For the first time, the entire command will be located in one spot; it now is spread across 10 trailers and temporary buildings on three bases in Hawaii.

In the meantime, the
Navy has given the lab 20,000 square feet of temporary space so that it can work the identification of more remains simultaneously.

The JPAC lab identifies about two Americans per week, and each case can take years to complete. Historians there work on as many as 800 cases at a time, piecing information together like a puzzle.

To date, the JPAC has identified nearly 1,500 formerly missing servicemembers. They have recovered 913 from the
Vietnam War, 107 from the Korean War, 17 from the Cold War, 456 from World War Two and four from World War I.

But for all of the DoD's efforts, the process is still painstakingly slow for those waiting for an identification of a missing family member, Crisp said.

"It is never as fast as it can be. Because if it is your husband or brother, you want to know immediately," Crisp said. "It's never fast enough. It's not fast enough for us, and it's not fast enough for the families."

Even second- or third-generation family members feel the impact of a missing servicemember, Ray said.

"As they get older, sometimes the emotion gets stronger, because they are facing leaving the world with unfinished business," he said.

That's part of the reason his office hosts 10 family updates across the country each year. At many of the updates, he makes time to answer questions on his office's efforts. They have met with 14,000 family members since 1995, Ray said.

At each of the updates, Ray's office encourages family members to have a DNA sample taken. The simple procedure of having a swab of saliva taken can help ensure that if or when their servicemember is recovered, the remains can be identified.

While the DNA rarely is the singular piece of evidence to identify a servicemember, when combined with other evidence, it can be the one piece that puts the puzzle together, Crisp said.

"The most frustrating part is to have gone through all of this and then get to the point where you can't find the one piece of information that lets you identify the hero," Crisp said.

For the most part, the families are gracious and many times surprised at the extent of the government's efforts to bring their servicemember home. Getting away from Washington, D.C., and meeting with the families has a rejuvenating effect on him, Ray said.

"It reminds me of why I do this, and it makes it easy for me to get up in the morning," Ray said.

Ray said his job serves as a reminder that America's freedoms came with a sacrifice. Americans shouldn't forget, he said, because the families of those missing never will forget.

"We have a country blessed, ... but it has been the blood, sweat and tears of millions of Americans before us who answered the call when it was necessary, and did what they had to do, to include paying the ultimate price," Ray said. "We are where we are, standing on their shoulders."

Home Repair Scam Appears to Target Military Families

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

Sept. 17, 2008 - The letter that appeared in a soldier's mailbox promised an offer almost too good to be true: a home improvement loan approved by Congress and backed up by a government agency. Officials at the Federal Citizen Information Center fear it's a scam targeting
military members that uses the center's credibility to lure victims in.

An eagle-eyed soldier notified the Federal Citizen Information Center after receiving the ad from the "Home Information Center" linked to post office boxes in Dallas and in Owasso, Okla. The letter included a reference to FCIC's Web site in an apparent attempt to show a federal endorsement.

"The thing that immediately sends up a red flag is the fact that [the advertisement] says these loans are approved by the U.S. Congress," said Mary Levy, director of consumer education and outreach in the FCIC's Office of Citizen Services. "Congress would absolutely never approve any particular home improvement loan."

In addition, she said, the Federal Citizen Information Center has no association with the Home Information Center. Levy emphasized that home improvement services are regulated at the state and local level, not by the federal government.

Levy expressed concern that the letter might be one of many floating around that are targeting
military homeowners who, like many of their civilian neighbors, are struggling with financial concerns. Many are prime candidates for scams because they're young and relatively inexperienced in handling money, they're away from their extended families, and often have no roots in their new communities, she said. "That may make them particularly susceptible to these kinds of scams," Levy said.

Unscrupulous people have long focused their schemes on servicemembers and their families. Last year, the Federal Trade Commission and American Red Cross warned consumers about an identity-theft scam targeting families of deployed troops.

That scam involved someone calling a
military spouse, identifying herself as a representative of the Red Cross, and notifying the woman that her husband was hurt in Iraq and had been medically evacuated to Germany. The caller then said doctors could not start treatment until paperwork including the husband's Social Security number and birth date was completed.

The FTC called this scheme a variation of "phishing" – a technique identity thieves use to get personal or financial information from unwary consumers. The identity thief claims to represent a trusted source – a bank, a government agency, or in this case, the American Red Cross – to get someone to divulge personal information.


"
military families can become targets of scams, especially when the soldier is deployed thousands of miles away and the family is here," Levy said. "That's why it's so important that they have the information they need to protect themselves."

The Federal Citizen Information Center offers consumers tips for selecting a contractor to make home improvements and repairs:

-- Get recommendations and references. Talk to friends, family and others who have used the contractor for similar work.

-- Get at least three written estimates. Insist the contractors come to your home to evaluate what needs to be done. Be sure the estimates are based on the same work so that you can make meaningful comparisons.

-- Check contractor complaint records. Your state or local consumer protection agency or Better Business Bureau can provide this information.

-- Make sure the contractor meets licensing and registration requirements. Your state or local consumer protection agency can help you find out what these requirements are.

-- Get the names of suppliers and ask if the contractor makes timely payments.

-- Contact your local building inspection department to check for permit and inspection requirements. Be wary if the contractor asks you to get the permit; it could mean the firm is not licensed.

-- Be sure your contractor is insured. They should have personal liability, property damage and worker's compensation insurance for workers and subcontractors. Also check with your insurance company to find out if you are covered for any injury or damage that might occur.

-- Insist on a written contract that states exactly what work will be done, the quality of materials that will be used, warranties, timetables, the names of any subcontractors, the total price of the job and the schedule of payments.

-- Try to limit your down payment. Some states have laws limiting the amount of down payment required.

-- Understand your payment options. Compare the cost of getting your own loan vs. contractor financing.

-- Don't make a final payment or sign a final release until you are satisfied with the work and know that subcontractors and suppliers have been paid. Some state laws allow unpaid subcontractors and suppliers to put a lien on your home for bills the contractor failed to pay.


-- Pay by credit card when you can. You may have the right to withhold payment to the credit card company until problems are corrected.

The FCIC warns consumers of red flags that could indicate a fraudulent operator, including soliciting door-to-door, offering a quote out of line with other estimates, using pressure tactics or asking for the entire payment up front.

The Consumer Action Handbook, published annually by the FCIC, offers additional consumer information covering a wide range of topics. The FCIC Web site provides ordering information.

Guard, Reserve Observe Suicide Prevention Month

By T.D. Jackson
Special to American Forces Press Service

Sept. 17, 2008 - Sergeant Smith has started coming to work late. The usually punctual, upbeat soldier has not been on time for two weeks straight, and he seems withdrawn and distracted. His co-workers don't want to pry, but they know he's just ended a two-year relationship with his girlfriend and he took the breakup pretty badly.

On top of that, his unit got the word that in six months they will be deploying to Afghanistan again. Yesterday Sergeant Smith gave away an entire binder of CDs to another soldier, claiming he didn't have use for them any more. During his lunch breaks, he sits at his desk with headphones on and writes letters to various people in his family.

If someone you know displays this type of behavior,
Army Chaplain (Maj.) Douglas Brown said, you may need to ask the person if everything is OK.

"When someone is thinking about hurting themselves, they often show signs of odd behavior," said Brown, the post deputy chaplain, "[such as] not talking as much, withdrawing from former pleasures, giving away possessions."

The
Army observed National Suicide Prevention Week last week, and from Sept. 6 through Oct. 5 the Army National Guard and Army Reserve are observing Suicide Prevention Month. The Army is encouraging soldiers to watch out for their battle buddies, and as one way to encourage intervention, they're promoting the "ACE" – Ask, Care, Escort – concept, and have printed up wallet-size cards to explain it to soldiers:

-- Ask your buddy the question directly: Are you thinking about killing yourself?

-- Care for your buddy by listening, staying calm and removing harmful items from his/her possession.

-- Escort your buddy to someone within your chain of command, the chaplain or a behavioral health professional.

The chaplain emphasized that if servicemember have mentioned hurting themselves, you do not leave them alone. "Recognize if you're with them, you've just bought them some time," he said.

The chaplain said one of the misconceptions people have about suicide is that people don't mean it when they talk about killing themselves.

"If someone is despondent enough to say it, it's serious," Brown said. "You might think that a [suicidal] person has so much to live for, but they could have a change in their [
military] orders, a change in their relationships or their health. ... You never know what's taking place in a person's thoughts," he said.

Brown said suicidal people tend to have things out of perspective, which would explain why some situations would seem earth-shattering.

"Suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem," he said. "Their circumstances can change. God is able, no matter what the circumstance."

Dr. Marsha Rockey, a psychologist in the behavioral health office here, said that most of the time a soldier is seen immediately when he or she comes in.

"The first thing we do is figure out how to keep them safe and how to get them the help they need," she said, "so they don't feel like hurting themselves is the only solution."

Rockey said when troops come to see her, she and the person come up with a safety plan where they find someone to stay with the servicemember at all times and get the servicemember to give up the means of self-injury.

She said one mistaken belief that people have about suicide is that there's no stopping a person who decides to do it. "Most people don't want to die; they just want help," Rockey said. "They just don't want to be in pain, whether that's psychological or physical pain."

Rockey said one way a buddy can help is by talking to the person in a direct manner.

"Don't be afraid to ask, 'Have you thought about killing yourself?' " she said. "You asking about it is not going to make it worse." If the person answers "yes," she said, tell them you will help them, remind them that you care and take them somewhere to get help.

"And stay with them!" Rockey added.

In otherwise healthy people, suicidal thoughts often are brought about by a sudden, unexpected change in life circumstances, Rockey said, noting that 25 percent of the population – although not suicidal – experiences a major depressive episode in their lives.

"One out of four people have issues that cause significant depression," she said. "It's almost normal to find [certain situations] overwhelming. It's not a sign that you're weird or defective."

Rockey said it's just not that unusual to feel stressed out, especially given the unique stressors of
military service. However, servicemembers who believe they have serious mental health concerns should not delay treatment for mental health illnesses such as depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder, as these conditions can worsen and lead to suicide.

Brian Altman, acting chief operating officer for Suicide Prevention Action Network USA, wrote that
military personnel often hesitate to seek help for these conditions for fear that it will harm their careers or cause others to think they are weak.

"Consulting a health care professional for a mental health condition does not preclude an individual from obtaining a security clearance," he wrote. "Men and women of the military need to know that seeking help is a sign of strength."

(T.D. Jackson works in the Camp Atterbury Public Affairs Office.)

Guard Wades Into Indiana Flooding

By Army Spc. Thaddeus Harrington
Special to American Forces Press Service

Sept. 17, 2008 - About 180
Indiana National Guard soldiers and airmen are supporting relief missions during massive flooding in northern Indiana. Rain began to fall for 48 hours Sept. 11, caused by the remnants of Hurricane Ike as it passed through the Midwest. Ike's leftovers moved through Indiana carrying winds of 50 mph. Six to eight inches of heavy rain and high winds downed many power lines, reportedly leaving more than 87,000 people without electricity.

So far, Guard members have evacuated more than 5,000 people.

Initially, 40 Guardsmen were activated on Sept. 14 to assist the
Indiana Department of Homeland Security. Led by Army Lt. Col. Paul South, commander of the 113th Engineer Battalion, Indiana Guard personnel have been placing sandbags, providing security, conducting search-and-rescue missions and assisting local authorities. They also have provided equipment such as generators, aircraft, sandbag machines and high-water vehicles.

"The biggest task we have is getting hold of the incident planner at the location and determining their immediate needs," South said today. "Then we're looking into the near future and setting ourselves up to meet the follow-on needs before it really becomes a need."

The Guardsmen come from several units, including Joint Forces Headquarters, the 81st Troop Command, the 38th Infantry Division, the 219th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade and the 738th Medical Company.

During the evacuation of the Munster Medical Inn, a nursing facility 30 miles from Chicago, Guardsmen from the 81st Troop Command helped the local fire department evacuate 150 people from the five-story building. The soldiers assisted wheelchair-bound patients down several flights of stairs during the evacuation.

The
Indiana National Guard will continue its search-and-rescue missions, power generation, sandbagging and evacuation operations. Guardsmen also are helping to make the interstate highways passable.

"It's been a good experience for my guys, and a good experience for the Guard," South said. "We love doing this stuff, and we're glad we're here." But he looks forward to the mission being complete, he added.

"I'd like to see these guys get dry and get home in northwest
Indiana," he said.

(
Army Spc. Thaddeus Harrington serves at the National Guard Bureau.)

New Army Guard Division Focuses on Soldiers' Well-Being

By Army Spc. John Higgins
Special to American Forces Press Service

Sept. 17, 2008 - Soldiers and their families are the focus of a new division at the
Army National Guard Readiness Center here. In May, the center's Soldier/Family Support Service Division began providing services that include suicide prevention, family support and transition back from active duty.

"There has never been a time in history when we have made so many resources available to care for all aspects of well-being," said Erin Thede, chief of the Soldier/Family Support Service Division. "We are dedicated to pursuing policy and resources that improve our care and services so that no soldier or family is left behind."

Army Lt. Col. Ashleah Betchel, chief of the Soldier Support Branch at the Army National Guard Readiness Center, added that soldiers' care is everyone's responsibility.

"This is a commander's issue, a leader's issue, a soldier's issue, a family issue, and a community issue," she said. "There is ownership across the board for everybody to make sure that we're taking care of the soldiers in the right way. That's one of the reasons our division was formed -- to get the word out there."

Getting that word out is the responsibility of officers and noncommissioned officers starting at the division level, including
Army Master Sgt. Marshall Bradshaw, the Army National Guard Readiness Center's Suicide Prevention Program manager, because soldiers who need help won't always seek it.

"If we were to hire a professional counselor at the state level, ... you still couldn't get all the soldiers in to see that counselor," Bradshaw said. Another challenge for Bradshaw, the units, and the Guard is how to disseminate information and take care of troops who generally check in with their units only two days a month.

The solution for both problems comes from the communities Guard soldiers live and work in, Bradshaw said. Nonprofit groups such as the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors, religious organizations and even
police and firefighter chaplains are prepared to assist the Guard.

Bradshaw devotes much of his time to giving enthusiastic groups outside the Guard and the servicemembers' immediate families the tools they need to help.

"The organizations I've found want to help us," he said. They just don't know how."

Help from the communities helps Guard members at home, but a different method must be used during deployments, and a unit behavioral advocate adds to the
military's capacity to be mindful of soldiers' mental health.

"This is a cultural shift from the highest levels," said Maj. Quentin Collins, a special operations soldier who is now a chaplain at the readiness center. "From the chief of staff all the way down to the regular soldier, we must understand that we are not just machines. 'Soldier first' is not just a concept, it's a reality."

The unit behavioral advocate not only keeps an eye on mental health issues, but also assists with squad- and platoon-level training, which is performed in small groups on a regular basis rather than once or twice in a large group with one instructor for a whole company.

"The only way you can really encourage that kind of care is with that team concept. The idea is that you are a family, and families do hurt," Collins said. "It's the battle buddy concept taken a step forward."

Those changes cover soldiers during pre- and post-deployment in most cases. However, some soldiers may require even more care should they be injured during a mission. For them, the Guard has created a warrior transition unit with the sole focus of helping soldiers transition back to a unit, a civilian job or both.

Before the WTU, soldiers were assigned to a medical hold company, which fell under the medical treatment facility, wherever it was. The WTU changes this by placing recovering soldiers under the command and control section and allows them to receive more specific care with assistance from a case worker who monitors their progress more closely and a doctor who sees that they receive more individual care.

"Together, it all lines up, and the soldiers are actually finding that they're not at the medical facility as long," said
Army Staff Sgt. Sylvia Bastion, NCO in charge of the warrior transition section, which assists the WTUs. "It's more directed at their injuries or illness."

That emphasis is not merely on healing, but also on transition, with physical therapy augmented by occupational therapy or counseling sessions with professionals.

"Whether they're an active
Army soldier ... going back to [their unit], or a Guard soldier who has a job back in their hometown, the WTU can help," said Maj. Andrew Bishop, chief of the Warrior Transition Program. "It really focuses not just on the day-to-day accountability of where they are and what they're doing, but also on the transition services -- getting them to what's next in their lives."

(
Army Spc. John Higgins serves at the National Guard Bureau.)

MILITARY CONTRACTS September 17, 2008

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

Shell Oil Prod., U.S. Martinez,
Houston, Texas is being awarded a maximum $338,356,504 fixed price with economic price adjustment, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contract for aviation fuel. Other location of performance is Martinez, California. Using service is Defense Energy Support Center. There were originally 69 proposals solicited with 16 responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Oct. 30, 2009. The contracting activity is Defense Energy Support Center, Fort Belvoir, Va., (SP0600-08-R-0161).

Western Refining Co., L.P.,
El Paso, Texas is being awarded a maximum $177,749,226 fixed price with economic price adjustment, partial set-aside, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contract for jet fuel. Other location of performance is El Paso, Texas. Using service is Defense Energy Support Center. There were originally 69 proposals solicited with 16 responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Oct. 30, 2009. The contracting activity is Defense Energy Support Center, Fort Belvoir, Va., (SP0600-08-D-0504).

Science Applications International Corp. Fairfield, N.J., is being awarded a maximum $105,000,000 fixed price with economic price adjustment, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contract for maintenance, repair and operations supplies. There are no other locations of performance. Using services are
Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Federal Civilian Agencies. The proposal was originally Web solicited with 11 responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract is exercising the 4th one-year option. The date of performance completion is Sept. 17, 2009. The contracting activity is Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM500-02-D-0121).

Navajo Refining Co., LLC,
Dallas, Texas*, is being awarded a maximum $32,620,478 fixed price with economic price adjustment, partial set-aside, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contract for aviation fuel. Other location of performance is New Mexico. Using service is Defense Energy Support Center. There were originally 69 proposals solicited with 16 responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Oct. 30, 2009. The contracting activity is Defense Energy Support Center, Fort Belvoir, Va., (SP0600-08-D-0503).

Friction Products Co., Medina, Ohio is being awarded a maximum $5,394,800 firm fixed price contract for HMMWV Brake shoe sets. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is
Army. There were originally three proposals solicited with three responses. Contract funs will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Jan. 17, 2009. The contracting activity is Defense Supply Center Columbus, Columbus, Ohio (SPM7L3-08-M-2241).

Navy

Sundt – Williams Scotsman, a joint venture, Tempe, Ariz., is being awarded a $37,771,939 firm fixed price contract for site preparation and interim facilities at
Marine Corps Base and Marine Corps Air Station, Camp Pendleton. The work to be performed provides for design and construction of site improvements and utility infrastructure to support interim administration, billeting, armory, storage, and maintenance facilities over ten areas. The contract also contains ten unexercised options, which if all were exercised would increase cumulative contract value to $127,524,838. Work will be performed in Oceanside, Calif., and is expected to be completed by Sept. 2010. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website, with nine proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity (N62473-08-C-3511).

Lockheed Martin, Maritime Systems & Sensors, Mitchel Field, N.Y., is being awarded a $35,035,920 modification to a previously awarded cost plus incentive fee, cost plus fixed fee contract (N00030-08-C-0002) to exercise options to provide U.S., and U.K., Trident II (D5) Navigation Subsystem Engineering Support services requirements and Engineering Refueling Overhaul Support. The options increase the contract value to $112,088,003. Work will be performed in Mitchel Field, N.Y., and work is expected to be completed Sept. 2011. Contract funds will not expire by the end of the current fiscal year. The
Navy's Strategic Systems Programs, Arlington, Va., is the contracting activity

Bell-Boeing Joint Project Office, Amarillo, Texas, is being awarded a $23,035,546 fixed-price-incentive-fee delivery order against a previously issued basic ordering agreement (N00019-07-G-0008) for non-recurring engineering effort for ECP-762 Pre-Block A to Block B Retrofit in support of the MV-22 Osprey aircraft. Work will be performed in Amarillo, Texas, (60 percent) and Philadelphia, Pa., (40 percent), and is expected to be completed in Sept. 2009. Contract funds in the amount of $15,000,000 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

General Dynamics Information
Technology, Inc., Fairfax, Va., is being awarded a $13,609,708 modification to a previously awarded cost plus fixed fee, indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract (N68936-00-D-0061) to exercise an option for 270,400 hours of Maintenance Planning and Design Interface support services for the Naval Aviation Depot, North Island in San Diego, Calif. Work will be performed in San Diego, Calif., and is expected to be completed in Sept. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake, Calif., is the contracting activity.

General Dynamics Information
Technology, Fairfax, Va., is being awarded a $12,720,050 modification to a previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N00421-00-D-0328) to exercise an option for maintenance planning and design interface technical/management support services for the In-Service Support Center and Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, Jacksonville, Fla. These services include evaluating initial designs, evaluating proposed design changes, maintenance planning and sustaining maintenance plans. Work will be performed in Jacksonville, Fla., (90 percent), and Oklahoma City, Okla., (10 percent), and is expected to be completed in Sept. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

Navmar Applied Sciences Corp.,* Warminster, Pa., is being awarded a $9,968,424 cost plus fixed fee contract for a Phase III Small Business Innovative Research contract under topics N92-170 and N94-178 for near term and far term advanced surveillance, reconnaissance, and force protection systems. Work will be performed in Patuxent River, Md., (39 percent); Warminster, Pa., (24 percent); Yuma, Ariz., (16 percent); Afghanistan, (14 percent); and Iraq, (7 percent), and is expected to be completed in Sept. 2010. Contract funds in the amount of $1,530,406 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This SBIR Phase III contract was not competitively procured, under FAR 6.302-5. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, N.J., is the contracting activity (N68335-08-D-0470).

Lockheed Martin Corp., MS2, Syracuse, N.Y., is being awarded a $8,904,451 firm fixed price contract for spare parts in support of the AN/TPS-59(V) three radar system. Work will be performed in Syracuse, N.Y., and is expected to be completed by Jul. 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This procurement was not competitively procured with one proposal solicited and one offer received via the
Navy Electronic Commerce Online website. The Marine Corps Logistics Command, Contracting Department, Albany, Ga., is the contracting activity (M67004-08-C-0024).

Group 70 International, Inc.,
Honolulu, Hawaii, is being awarded a maximum $7,500,000 firm-fixed-price, indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity architect/engineer (A/E) contract for facilities and land use planning studies, environmental impact documents, cultural resources management plans, natural resources management plans, and environmental studies and documents in the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Pacific area of responsibility (AOR). Work will be performed at various locations under the NAVFAC Pacific AOR, and is expected to be completed by Sept. 2012. Contract funds in the amount of $10,000 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the NAVFAC e-solicitation website, with six offers received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Pacific, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is the contracting activity (N62742-08-D-0200).

Moffatt & Nichol-Blaylock, San Diego, Calif., is being awarded a maximum $7,500,000 firm fixed price, indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity architect/engineering contract for Waterfront Facilities Projects in the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southwest area of responsibility (AOR). The work to be performed provides for preparation of fully designed plans and specifications; design-build request for proposal packages; and other engineering designs, studies, inspections, surveys, planning documents (DD 1391), reports, cost estimates, evaluations, and construction support services for projects involving waterfront construction and repair. Work will be performed at various
Navy and Marine Corps facilities and other government facilities within the NAVFAC Southwest AOR including, but not limited to Calif., (87 percent), Ariz., (5 percent), Nev., (5 percent), Colo., (1 percent), N.M., (1 percent) and Utah, (1 percent), and is expected to be completed by Sept. 2013. Contract funds in the amount of $5,000 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website,with four offers received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity (N62473-08-D-8619).

Jacobs
Technology Inc., Fort Walton Beach, Fla., is being awarded a $7,400,000 task order #0018 under previously awarded contract (M67854-02-A-9017) to provide support of the transition from the NMCI environment to the next generation USMC IT environment. This includes financial planning, programming, budgeting and execution of the USMC enterprise budget throughout the Future Year Defense Plan; acquisition management supporting the next generation IT environment; program management activities; USMC representation and coordination with Navy Next Generation Enterprise Network office, the Secure Operational Network Infrastructure Capability, Program of Record activities as well as providing expertise in all other forums related to the delivery of this new IT environment. Work will be performed in Quantico, Va., and work is expected to be completed in Sept. 2009. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Marine Corps System Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity.

J Squared, Incorporated, (dba: University Loft Co.), Greenfield, Ind., is being awarded a $5,776,800 firm fixed price contract for the Whole Room Concept Program barracks support, located at
Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, N.C., Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S.C., and Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, S.C. Included in the contract cost is the installation of the procured furniture. Work will be performed in Camp Lejeune, N.C., (85 percent); Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, S.C., (10 percent) and Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S.C., (5 percent) and work is expected to be completed Feb. 28, 2009. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via an unrestricted Request For Quote being forwarded to12 Federal Supply Schedule Holders. Seven offers were received in response to the RFQ. The Marine Corps Installations East, Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, N.C., is the contracting activity (M67001-08-F-0060).

Army

University of Texas Health Science Center at
Houston, Houston, Texas, was awarded on Sept. 16, 2008, a $9,262,639 firm fixed price contract. The university will establish a data and coordinating center that provides the necessary infrastructure for conducting a collaborative trial to identify the optimal blood component resuscitation ratios for patients receiving massive transfusions. Work will be performed in Houston, Texas, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 15, 2010. Nine bids were solicited and four bids were received. USA Medical Research Acquisitions Activity, Frederick, Md., is the contracting activity (W81XWH-08-C-0712).

Booz Allen Hamilton Inc., McLean, Va., was awarded on Sept. 12, 2008, a $7,772,624 firm fixed price contract. The contractor shall provide all personnel, equipment, tools, materials, supervision, and other items and non-personal services necessary to perform business intelligence services. Work will be performed in Raleigh, N.C., with an estimated completion date of Sept. 15, 2011. Seventeen bids were solicited and three bids were received. National Guard Bureau, Arlington, Va., is the contracting activity (W91QUZ-06-D-0019).

Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, Calif., was awarded on Sept. 15, 2008, $6,734,338 cost plus fixed fee contract. The primary objective of the Advanced Night Vision System program is to develop core technologies for improving our night vision capability in urban operations. Work will be performed in San Diego, Calif., Elk River, Minn., Bull Shoals, Ariz., Palo Alto, Calif., Watertown, Mass., and Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., with an estimated completion date of Mar., 15, 2010. Bids were solicited via the Broad Agency Announcement and three bids were received. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Arlington, Va., is the contracting activity (HR0011-08-C-0144).

MWH Americas Inc, Anchorage, Ala., was awarded on Sept. 15, 2008, a $9,417,100 firm/fixed/price contract. IDIQ design and contract upgrades to Arctic Utilidors, Phase IX (PH9), Eielson
Air Force Base, Ala. Work will be performed in Eielson Air Force Base, Ala., with an estimated completion date of Oct. 15, 2010. Two bids were solicited and two bids were received. U.S. Army Engineer District, Ala., is the contracting activity (W911KB-05-D-0013).