Military News

Friday, May 01, 2009

'Home of Warrior Care' Hits Century Mark

By John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service

May 1, 2009 - Walter Reed Army Medical Center opened its doors here 100 years ago today as an 80-bed facility at a time of U.S. peace. "There was no ceremony, no dedication and no fanfare," Walter Reed historian Sherman Fleek said. "Medical treatment and care commenced quietly."

Not long after, the hospital swelled with World War I casualties suffering from head injuries, amputations, mustard gas exposure and other injuries. The Army's "Home of Warrior Care" expanded to as many as 2,500 beds as veterans from World War II, Korea and Vietnam returned home wounded.

In recent times, the Defense Department's largest military hospital has adapted to the needs of war-injured servicemembers from the operations in Iraq and Afghanistan and in the broader fight against extremism. Today, the 247-bed center is one of the world's foremost medical facilities, Army officials said, with 60 outpatient clinics and 16 operating rooms and a staff that combines patient care, teaching and research.

Army Col. (Dr.) Norvell V. Coots, commander of the Walter Reed Health Care System, said the medical center staff learns something new about military health care from each of the soldiers it treats.

"When you add it all together, these individual nuances in a soldier's treatment, his or her medical or surgical care, their special technology needs, and the impact on family members and loved ones, all teach us invaluable lessons in patient care," he said in an e-mailed response to questions.

The Military Advanced Training Center, a recently added 31,000-square-foot rehabilitation center and gym with a nearly $9 million price tag, is one example of the hospital responding to soldiers' needs.

Since it opened in September 2007, troops who have undergone amputations have used the center's computer- and video-monitoring systems, infrared camera-assisted motion analysis and other sophisticated technology to help them adapt to new prosthetic limbs.

On the center's bottom floor last week, a young Afghanistan war veteran inside the mirror-lined workout area stood on a prosthetic leg as he finished sets on a weight machine.

Army Sgt. Joshua Ben was a cavalry scout with the 82nd Airborne Division deployed to Kabul in late 2007 when he encountered a massive ambush. Ben was told some 300 insurgents had been hiding in the tree line, waiting for his convoy.

"We had four trucks patrolling through this one town, and we hit a straight gravel road that was about four miles long," he recalled. "My truck took nine [rocket-propelled grenades]. The first one came through the door and took my leg off."

The sergeant also was shot eight times, with his protective equipment absorbing the blows of six rounds. He was one of a dozen soldiers in the 18-man unit to suffer wounds.

Ben, who plans to use the GI Bill to earn an undergraduate degree in forensic science, now is an outpatient who lives at Walter Reed's Mologne House and is part of a warrior transition brigade – a regimented recovery infrastructure designed to ease the healing process.

"It's gone pretty good," he said of his time at the hospital. "It's just all about the recovery. Physical therapy every day, and going to appointments."

Walter Reed, however, has not always enjoyed such favorable reports regarding its outpatient care.

In early 2007, the Washington Post published a series of articles that shed light on poor conditions at the hospital's facilities, describing America's wounded warrior outpatients living in moldy rooms laden with belly-up cockroaches and stained carpets, and soldiers forced to face a cumbersome bureaucracy at the hospital.

In the wake of the reports, a bipartisan panel was tasked to fix problems with wounded servicemembers' care. Since then, the hospital has implemented a series of sweeping reforms amid what Coots referred to as the "era of opportunity."

During this period, the Army launched the Warrior Transition System, which assigns a primary care manager, nurse case manager and squad leader to each of the wounded. Among other initiatives, the hospital now boasts the Soldier Family Assistance Center and a primary care clinic that exclusively treats those recently injured.

"So many great initiatives have developed out of that crisis," Coots said via e-mail. "National and military leadership from around the world come to Walter Reed to see and earn about all of the great things that are being done in this world-class facility."

Army Maj. Walter Reed, who earned his first medical degree in 1869 at the age of 17, is best known for leading a research team to the watershed discovery that mosquitoes were responsible for transmitting yellow fever. The hospital that bears his name continues the quest for medical breakthroughs.

The medical center is at the forefront of research covering post-traumatic stress disorder and other emotional and mental manifestations of the war experience, Coots said.

"It has always been a place for research, and through all of these years, great advances in the science and application of medicine have been made by notable staff members," Coots said. "War has always been the motivator behind rapid advances in clinical care and medical technology, and that is certainly no different now."

Program Makes High-Cost Schooling Accessible to Troops, Vets

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

May 1, 2009 - Servicemembers and veterans who enroll in the new Post-9/11 GI Bill will be able to attend some of the country's most prestigious – and high-cost –universities, thanks to a new program that's gaining momentum in academic circles. Keith Wilson, director of education service for the Veterans Benefits Administration, reported growing interest in the Yellow Ribbon Program.

"We're getting a lot of activity in that area," he said. "There are a lot of schools that have expressed interest in participating."

Participating colleges and universities enter into an agreement with VA to fund tuition expenses above the highest public in-state undergraduate tuition rate. That rate, the maximum the Post-9/11 GI Bill can pay by law, varies from state to state.

Under the Yellow Ribbon Program, the school waives or offsets up to 50 percent of those higher costs, and VA will match that same amount.

If, for example, the tuition bill at a participating university is $20,000 and the Post-9/11 GI Bill can pay only $15,000, the university and VA will split the $5,000 difference, explained Tammy Duckworth, who was confirmed last week as VA's assistant secretary for public and intergovernmental affairs.

Duckworth's alma mater, Washington's George Washington University, became the latest institution to sign on to the program this week. GW's commitment provides for 360 veteran students to benefit during the 2009-2010 academic year, which university officials expect to cover all eligible undergraduate and graduate students.

Under the agreement, qualified servicemembers and veterans attending GW as undergraduates will receive free tuition, and those attending as graduate students will receive a significantly discounted rate.

In announcing the university's participation, GW President Steven Knapp called the school's estimated $2.5 million investment in the program during the upcoming school year a way of giving back.

"This is a significant investment in those who have sacrificed so much on our behalf," he said. "We as a nation owe our veterans a debt of gratitude, and this commitment will enable veterans who attend GW to have the kind of educational opportunity the original GI Bill envisioned."

Other schools large and small have signed on or are considering the program.

At Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., officials said they couldn't say no to the initiative. "It's really exciting for us, because it's an opportunity for us to serve veterans who have served our country," public relations director Karrie Heartlein said. "As you know, veterans deserve the best our country has to offer, and that includes the opportunity to attend the college of their choice. The opportunity for them to attend Knox College is very exciting."

La Roche College in McCandless, Pa., also joined the program. "We're honored to play a role in helping our veterans reach their education and career goals," said Hope Schiffgens, director of the school's Office of Graduate Studies and Adult Education. "This is a time in our nation's history when education and retraining is vitally important, especially to this group of men and women who have given so much to us."

Jerry Jackson, dean of enrollment management at Union College in Barbourville, Ky., said his school also looks forward to working with veterans through the Yellow Ribbon Program. "We're eager to get this program started and to make sure our veterans know they're welcome as students at Union," he said. "We're proud to be able to help cover the cost of a college education for people who have served our country."

"I am so pleased that Centenary College will be able to provide this benefit to the fine men and women who have served our country," echoed Barbara-Jayne Lewthwaite, acting president of Centenary College in Hackettstown, N.J. "It is an honor to be able to reward these individuals for their dedication. Additionally, we look forward to benefiting from their global experiences in the classroom based on their military service."

In announcing his school's participation, Mari Ditzler, president of Monmouth College in Monmouth, Ill., said he looks forward to the opportunity "to serve those who have served our country."

"The residential liberal arts experience at colleges like Monmouth has been described as uniquely American," he said. "We are pleased that the Yellow Ribbon Program will enable our veterans to experience this special approach to learning and living."

"We are excited to be a part of the Yellow Ribbon Program and to support our nation's veterans," agreed Joel Bauman, vice president of enrollment services at Westminster College in Salt Lake City. "This program allows us to offer educational opportunities to those who have made tremendous sacrifices, and this is one way we can give back and thank them for their service."

In Pittsburgh, Seton Hill University's vice president for enrollment services, Barbara Hinkle, called the program a win-win situation. "We're very excited about the possibilities -- both for our current students whose families may qualify, but also for future students as they come back from being deployed or their family members who are here," she said.

Wilson said he expects more schools to join their ranks as Yellow Ribbon Program participants.

"We just started soliciting applications about two weeks ago," he said. "We're processing them as they come in, and we're getting them coming in every day."

VA began accepting applications for the Post-9/11 GI Bill today. The new benefit takes effect Aug. 1. It is among several VA-sponsored educational benefits available to servicemembers and veterans.

Obama Lauds Newly Naturalized U.S. Servicemembers

By John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service

May 1, 2009 - President Barack Obama today welcomed two dozen American servicemembers as newly naturalized citizens of the United States. "It is my honor and my personal pleasure to be the first to address you as my fellow Americans. Welcome to your White House," Obama told the group after it had recited the oath of citizenship during a ceremony in the East Room attended by Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates and other guests.

Obama also presented the Outstanding American by Choice Award to Canadian-born Peter Lemon, who became an American citizen at age 12 and later deployed to Vietnam as a U.S. Army Ranger.

Lemon was wounded four times when his unit came under fire in Tay Ninh province, yet he continued defending his fellow soldiers. President Richard M. Nixon awarded Lemon the Medal of Honor for his actions.

"His experience is a testament to the men and women who have come to this country to build a better life for themselves and their families, and who have, by their commitment and contribution, made America a much better place as well," Obama said.

"One of you might win this some day," Obama told the audience as he held the commendation. "You're already well on the way."

Troops who achieved citizenship today were:

-- Army Spc. Anthony Barber Agraviador, originally of the Phillipines.

-- Army National Guardsman Alex Almendras Butron, originally of Bolivia. His rank was not available.

-- Army Pfc. Priscella Decoda Beacher, originally of Jamaica.

-- Navy Seaman Recruit Carlyle Christophe Campbell, originally of Jamaica.

-- Navy Seaman Apprentice Jeanne Ginette Ebongue Tapo, originally of Gabon.

-- Army Pvt. Ricardo Kelene Fender, originally of Jamaica.

-- Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Christian Karl Glenn, originally of Germany.

-- Army Spc. Xaverie Caroline Hildebrandt, originally of Cameroon.

-- Marine Sgt. Donaven Jack, originally of Micronesia.

-- Navy Seaman Przemyslaw Lesniewica, originally of Poland.

-- Marine Lance Cpl. Juan Miguel Leyva Marrero, originally of Cuba.

-- Marine Lance Cpl. Anthony Marcus McKoy, originally of Guyana.

-- Navy Seaman Apprentice Nijinsky Orlando Mendez Belmonte, originally of Bolivia.

-- Marine Sgt. Abdul Goffur Guillermo Mondol Romero, originally of Nicaragua.

-- Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Alejandro Nunez, originally of Mexico.

-- Army Spc. Chryshann Pierre, originally of the Bahamas.

-- Navy member Leonardo Porras, originally of Colombia. His rank was not available.

-- Marine Pfc. Jose Miguel Quijano, originally of Peru.

-- Marine Cpl. Hazzell Abigail Ramos, originally of Nicaragua.

-- Army Pfc. Jorge Fancisco Sifuentos Velasco, originally of El Salvador.

-- Navy Seaman Eder Asael Valle Hernandez, originally of Mexico.

-- Air Force member Armel Possi Yepmo, originally of Cameroon, whose rank was not available.

-- Army National Guardsman Can Yurdagul, originally of Turkey, whose rank was not available.

-- Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Jeonathan Ezequiel Zapata, originally of Nicaragua.

"Each of you has a unique story to tell about the journey that led you here," Obama told the new citizens. "You hail from every corner of the earth, from Southeast Asia to Central Europe, from West Africa to South America. But all of you have one thing in common. You're here because you have not merely chosen to live in this country. You've chosen to serve this country."

Take Anti-Flu Drugs Only After Diagnosis, Military Doc Says

By Fred W. Baker III
American Forces Press Service

May 1, 2009 - Senior military health officials are warning against taking antiviral medicines to fight the H1N1 flu virus until a doctor has confirmed the diagnosis. Most patients treated at military medical treatment facilities for flu-like symptoms don't actually have the H1N1 or any other kind of flu virus, officials said.

"Everything that looks like flu is not flu. Most of the cases where people think they have the flu, they actually have some other respiratory disease," said Army Lt. Col. (Dr.) Wayne Hachey, director of preventive medicine for the Defense Department's health affairs office.

Taking the flu medicine without having the virus causes several problems, Hachey said. First, the medicine will have no effect on what actually ails the patient, so the symptoms may only get worse.

The antiviral medicine does not act like a flu vaccine to prevent the flu. Taking the antiviral medicine before diagnosis negates the drug's ability to later fight the virus if the patient is infected, Hachey explained, and it simply depletes the national stockpile available to those actually diagnosed with the H1N1 virus.

Finally, Hachey warned that all drugs have potential side effects. "Taking a medication that you don't need subjects you to increased risks," he said.

Military treatment facilities are not prescribing antiviral drugs such as Tamiflu unless they suspect the H1N1 virus. Tests done locally cannot determine conclusively that a patient has the virus, but Hachey said they are fairly accurate at pinpointing it.

Military doctors send their suspected samples to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta to confirm the diagnosis. In the meantime, if doctors suspect the virus based on local tests, they take the necessary precautions with the patient and prescribe treatment, Hachey said.

In the next few weeks, military doctors should be able to conduct the tests locally, Hachey said. In the meantime, the Defense Department has a robust system of detection across the globe to protect its servicemembers and families, he added.

Defense Department health officials are "pretty familiar with being able to control and limit the impact of those kinds of diseases, especially influenza," he said. The department has been preparing for a pandemic for the past decade, and has been ramping up its abilities to detect and provide services for the past five years, he noted. A robust surveillance system of 200 sites in 100 countries is tied into a network that reports on patients' symptoms. If several patients in the same region report similar symptoms, the system shows a spike in that area.

Doctors are tied into the system locally, and senior commanders at the Pentagon can view the results globally in near-real time.

"We really do have a nice global perspective using a multitude of different surveillance assets across the [Defense Department] community that all channel into one site," Hachey said. "That way we can shift resources, we can do further investigations, and ... we can also tell someone in a particular area [they may] have a problem."

All the information is shared with the CDC and other state and federal agencies, he said.

The Defense Department is not an island, the doctor noted. "We're part of the national community, so what happens on one part of the fence really impacts what happens on the other side of the fence," he said. "So the more we share information, the better off both of us are."

But for now, military doctors are reporting that the H1N1 virus is relatively mild and is not having much of an impact on the young, healthy troops who make up most of the military. They are, however, urging caution for those who feel they are showing symptoms, and pushing preventive measures to prevent the disease.

"The most important thing right now ... is if you're sick, stay home," Hachey said. "Right now it's a mild disease, so staying at home is a very effective treatment."

The most critical preventive measures include washing hands and covering your mouth when you cough, the same as with any flu, said U.S. Public Health Service Rear Adm. Thomas J. McGinnis, chief of pharmaceutical operations for the Tricare Management Activity.

"From what we see right now, it's not much different than the regular seasonal flu," McGinnis said. "It has a possibility of becoming a pandemic, or it may mediate. We don't know yet."

Most will know the difference between the symptoms of the common cold and the flu, McGinnis said.

"The flu really debilitates you. It knocks you down. And only at that point do we recommend you go to the doctor and seek treatment for the flu," he said. "When you have aches and pains all over, fever, chills, cough, that's when you need to be seen by a provider."

Obama Says N1H1 Flu 'Cause for Concern, Not Alarm'

By Linda D. Kozaryn
American Forces Press Service

May 1, 2009 - The outbreak of N1H1 flu "is a cause for concern, but not alarm," President Barack Obama said today after meeting with his Cabinet. Government officials are monitoring the situation closely, he said, and the health and the safety of the American people is his top priority.

A week after learning about the novel strain of flu virus affecting people in Mexico, the United States and other countries around the globe, Obama said, he is proud of the work done by the Department of Health and Human Services, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Homeland Security.

"We're obviously focused on what needs to be done immediately, identifying and mitigating cases of H1N1 in the United States, pre-positioning anti-viral treatments for those who are infected and making sure that they are distributed appropriately around the country, providing clear guidance as well as the best science for state and local officials as they move forward and speak clearly to the American people, as I did the evening of the news conference about the mitigation steps that they personally can take," the president said.

Obama noted that officials are not certain that the H1N1 flu will be more severe than other seasonal flus that kill 36,000 people on average every year and cause about 200,000 hospitalizations. H1N1 may run its course like ordinary flus, he said, noting that the reason scientists are concerned is that this is a new strain.

"Americans and people around the world have not built up immunity in the same way that they've built up immunity to the seasonal flus that we're accustomed to," Obama said. "Those seasonal flus may change, mutate slightly from year to year, but they're all roughly in the same band. When you have a new strain, then potentially our immune systems can't deal with it as effectively. And there are indications that in Mexico, at least, what you saw were relatively young, healthy people die from the H1N1, rather than people whose immune system is already compromised -- older individuals, very small infants, and so forth."

Although the United States has not yet seen those same kinds of fatalities among young, healthy people, he said, White House officials want to ensure they're preparing appropriately.

"So I just want everybody to be clear that this is why this is a cause for concern, but not alarm," he said. "We are essentially ensuring that in the worst-case scenario we can manage this appropriately -- government working with businesses, individuals, and the private sector -- and are containing an outbreak so we can ultimately get through this."

Along with focusing on immediate needs, the president said, government officials also need to prepare for the long term. "Even if it turns out that the H1N1 is relatively mild on the front end, it could come back in a more virulent form during the actual flu season," Obama warned.

To this end, he said, officials are investing in the public health infrastructure and discussing the production of vaccines in anticipation of the flu season. They also are making sure federal agencies are coordinating, and that they have that they have appropriate action plans.

For example, he noted, White House officials are working with the Department of Education to provide clear guidelines for school closures. They're also working with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce to ensure that businesses are supportive of hourly workers who need to stay home but may be worried about losing their jobs because they don't have sick leave.

White House officials also are involved in discussions with the secretary of state and the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, he said, "about how we're going to respond to potential requests from other countries for assistance in dealing with this issue."

"Overall I'm very pleased with the progress that we've made," Obama said. "I think that those who have been on top of this have done an extraordinary job. I'm optimistic that we're going to be able to manage this effectively, but we still have more work to do, and I'm glad I've got such a great team doing it.

Obama said he wanted the American people to know their government is doing everything it can and should in the face of the outbreak. "The reason I brought this Cabinet meeting together is that we are taking this very seriously, and we will take every single step that's necessary to make sure that the American people are safe," he said.

MILITARY CONTRACTS May 1, 2009

AIR FORCE
The Air Force is awarding a time and materials contract to TASC, Inc. of Andover, Mass., for $19.3 million. This action will provide engineering and technical support services. At this time, $1.6 million has been obligated. 95 ELSG/PK, San Antonio, Texas is the contracting activity (FA8707-09-F-0006).

The Air Force is awarding a cost plus fixed fee contract to Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc., of Herndon, Va., for an estimated $17,727,575. This contract will provide technical area tasking to provide the Office of Information Assurance and Compliance with innovative Information Assurance analysis for the U.S. Army's cryptographic modernization programs which link satellites, sensors, communication devices and aircraft throughout the field. At this time, $367,150 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska is the contracting activity (SP0700-98-D-4002).

The Air Force is modifying a contract with McDonnell Douglas Corp., of Long Beach, Calif., for an increase of $16,000,000. This contract modification is for the C-17 Globemaster III Sustainment Partnership contract to increase funding for FY09 material improvement projects for the USAF. At this time, the entire amount has been obligated. 16 AESG/PK, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8814-04-C-2004).

The Air Force is awarding a firm fixed price contract to Chromalloy Component Services, Inc., of San Antonio, Texas for an estimated $15,812,960. This action will provide for remanufacturing of Module 13/13 Assemblies in support of F-108 engines. At this time, the entire amount has been obligated. 448 SCMG/PKBB, Tinker Air Force Base, Okla., is the contracting activity (FA8121-09-D-0012).

The Air Force is awarding a cost plus fixed fee contract to Northrop Grumman Information Technology of Chantilly, Va., for $12,645,999. This contract action will provide Space Control Architecture Development in support of offensive and defensive counterspace, space situational awareness, and command and control mission areas. At this time, $5,525,693 has been obligated. SYSW/PK, Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif., is the contracting activity (FA8819-09-C-0001).

The Air Force is awarding a cost plus fixed fee contract to Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc., of Herndon, Va., for $9,661,001. This action will provide the Chief of Naval Operations Intelligence Directorate with intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance strategic integration capability analysis and assessments. At this time, $144,928 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., is the contracting activity (SP0700-03-D-1380).

NAVY
Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative, Inc. (SMECO), Hughesville, Md., is being awarded a $154,000,000 utilities privatization contract for electric distribution services to Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Patuxent River, Md. The initial two years of the contract are fixed price. The work to be performed provides for installation of metering during the initial two year fixed-price period; operation, maintenance and repair of the systems as well as renewal and replacement of the system's components over the term of the contract. This procurement was initiated and procured under the authority of 10 U.S.C. 2688. At the conclusion of the two year period, the contract will be subject to SMECO's Retail Electric Service Tariff. The facilities covered under this contract include Naval Air Station, Patuxent River, Webster Field Annex, and Solomon's Island Annex. The contract consists of a utilities service contract which provides the electrical distribution services for a period not to exceed fifty years. The utility assets will be conveyed via a sale and quitclaim deed. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website, with two offers received. ; The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Atlantic, Norfolk, Va. is the procuring contracting activity and the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Washington, Washington, D.C., is the administrative contracting activity (N62470-09-C-9026).

Straub-Martin A Joint Venture, Bonsall, Calif., is being awarded a $92,249,000 firm fixed price contract for design and build of three USMC Bachelor Enlisted Quarters (BEQ) and a parking structure at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif. Each BEQ will house 384 Marines in the standard 2+0 configuration and will include a multipurpose community area and laundry facilities. This contract contains three options which may be exercised within 548 calendar days from award, bringing the total contract amount to $101,351,672. Work will be performed at Twentynine Palms, Calif., and is expected to be completed by April 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website, with 10 proposals received. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwest, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity (N62473-09-C-1228).

Raytheon Co., Space and Airborne Systems, Goleta, Calif., is being awarded an $83,629,539 firm fixed priced contract for the 11th full-rate-production of 93 AN/ALR-67(V)3 Radar Warning Receivers for the U.S. Navy (43) and the Governments of Canada, (26), Australia, (19), and Switzerland, (5), including supplies and services. The AN/ALR-67A(V)3, which is installed on the F/A-18E/F aircraft, provides accurate identification, lethality and azimuth displays of hostile and friendly emitters. Work will be performed in Goleta, Calif., (41 percent); Lansdale, Pa., (18 percent); Forest, Miss., (12 percent); Chatsworth, Calif., (11 percent); San Diego, Calif., (10 percent); Sydney, Australia, (4 percent); Milwaukie, Ore., (2 percent); and McKinney, Texas, (2 percent), and is expected to be completed in Feb. 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. This contract combines purchases for the U.S. Navy, ($35,808,159 (43 percent), and the Governments of Canada, ($22,293,498; 27 percent); Australia, ($13,410,804; 16 percent); and Switzerland, ($12,117,078; 14 percent) under the Foreign Military Sales Program. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity (N00019-09-C-0052).

Alutiiq International Solutions, LLC,* Anchorage, Alaska, is being awarded a $72,160,269 firm fixed price, indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity contract for on-post 911 Regional Armed Security Officer Services at Cheatham Annex/Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Va.; Naval Security Group Activity, Northwest Annex, Va.; Naval Air Station Brunswick, Maine; Naval Air Station Lakehurst, N.J.; Naval Submarine Base New London, Conn.; and Naval Shipyard Portsmouth, N.H. The work to be performed provides security operations to ensure protection and safety for personnel, property, facilities and assets. The Contractor shall provided armed and administrative security services and may be working alongside existing government security forces that have law enforcement responsibilities. Work will be performed in Yorktown, Va.; Chesapeake, Va.; Brunswick, Maine; Lakehurst, N.J.; New London, Conn.; and Portsmouth, N.H., and work is expected to be completed April 2014. Concurrently, Task Order 0001 will be awarded for the base year in the amount of $5,746,451. Contract funds for Task Order 0001 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured utilizing the Small Business Administration's 8(a) Program and was advertised via the Naval Facilities Engineering Command e-solicitation website, with 11 proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (N40085-09! -D-9967) .

Harkins Builders, Inc., Marriottsville, Md., is being awarded a $68,496,080 firm fixed price construction contract for design and construction of student quarters, instruction facility, instruction facility addition and student officers quarters in support of The Basic School (TBS), Marine Corps Base Quantico. Work will be performed in Quantico, Va., and is expected to be completed by February 2013. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website, with 13 proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Washington, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity (N40080-09-C-0009).

L-3 Communications Integrated Systems, LP, Waco, Texas, is being awarded a $15,180,706 cost plus fixed fee modification to a previously awarded indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity contract (N00019-05-D-0008) to provide Zone 5 critical airframe structures replacement for the P-3C aircraft. Work will be performed in Greenville, Texas, (50 percent) and Birmingham, Ala., (50 percent), and is expected to be completed in March 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

Ultra Electronics, Austin, Texas, is being awarded a $14,791,576 firm fixed price contract to provide the necessary equipment, materials, personnel, and facilities to design, develop, build, and deliver, and support an upgraded Command and Control (C2) and microwave system for the Bahrain Defense Force (BDF). Systems/equipment shall be installed and tested at the following locations, Jebel Al Dukhan Radar Site, Sheikh Isa Air Base, BDF General Headquarters, Mina Salman Naval Base, and Kusayyfa. Included with the upgraded systems, the contractor shall provide training and on-site field service support. The work is to be accomplished in two phases. This contract involves Foreign Military Sales to the country of Bahrain. This contract contains two one-year options, which if exercised, will bring the total contract value to $20,606,505. Work will be performed in Bahrain, and work is expected to be completed in April 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was sole sourced under FAR 6.302-4/DFAR 206.302-4 International Agreement. The Marine Corps System Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity (M67854-09-C-2112).

Straub Construction Inc., Bonsall, Calif., is being awarded $9,573,000 for firm fixed price task order #0004 under a multiple award construction contract (N62473-08-D-8616) for the design and construction of a multi-story Infantry Training Center with administrative and support areas and a Grounds Maintenance Building with a vehicle holding shed at the Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif. Work will be performed in Oceanside, Calif., and is expected to be completed by November 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Five proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, Calif. is the contracting activity.

General Dynamics – Bath Iron Works (BIW), Bath, Maine, is being awarded contract N00024-09-C-2302 for Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) FY09 Flight 0+ ship construction, class design services, configuration management services, additional crew and shore support, special studies and post delivery support. As this award represents Phase I of a competitive two-phased acquisition approach to procure FY09/FY10 LCS, with Phase II including potential award of up to three additional LCS Flight 0+ Class ships, the award amount is considered source selection information (see FAR 2.101 and 3.104) and will not be made public at this time. Work will be performed in Mobile, Ala., (50 percent); Bath, Maine, (17 percent); Pittsfield, Mass., (14 percent); Ottowa, Ontario, (2 percent); California, Md., (1 percent); Baltimore, Md., (1 percent); Leesburg, Va., (1 percent); Burlington, Vt., (1 percent); and various locations of less than 1 percent each totaling 13 percent, and work is expected to be completed by June 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C. is the contracting activity (N00024-09-C-2302).

ARMY
Satterfield-Pontikes Construction, Houston Texas, was awarded on Apr. 30, 2009 a $23,320,394 firm fixed price contract for the design/build construction of and AFRC located in San Marcos, Texas. Work is to be performed in San Marcos, Texas with an estimated completion date of Aug. 15, 2010. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web and twenty-one (21) bids were received. U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, Louisville, Kan., is the contracting activity (W912QR-09-C-0027).

RAND Enterprises, Inc., Newport News, Va., was awarded on Apr. 30, 2009 a $16,799,709 firm fixed price contract for the design/build dining facilities, Fort Jackson, S.C., The scope of this contract shall be design and construct a dining facility for 2600 people. The project shall include site work, building, food service equipment and furnishings. Work is to be performed in Fort Leonard Wood, Mich., with an estimated completion date of Dec. 30, 2010. Bids were solicited using FedBizOps and one bid received. USACE, Norfolk District, Norfolk Va., is the contracting activity (W91236-09-D-0014).

Daimler Trucks North America LLC., Portland, Ore.., was awarded on Apr. 30, 2009 a $6,770,570 firm fixed price contract for the delivery order 0115 adds 40 each, M915A3 Trucks Tractors and 10 each, M916A3 Light Equipment Transporters to the contract. Work is to be performed in Portland, Ore., with an estimated completion date of Nov. 30, 2009. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web and two bids were received. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (DAAE07-00-D-S002).

FN Manufacturing, LLC, Columbia, S.C. was awarded on Apr. 29, 2009 a $ 7,814,587 firm fixed price contract for the purchase of a total quantity of 181,639 each M249 Machine Gun short barrels. Work is to be performed in Columbia, S.C. with an estimated completion date of Oct. 19, 2009. One bid was solicited with one bid received. TACOM Contracting Center, Rock Island, III. is the contracting activity (DAAE20-03-C-0100).

General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc, Poway, Calif. was awarded a $ 23,520,000 cost plus incentive fee contract for the acquisition of Production Ready Test Assets (PRTA) Extended Range Multi-Purpose (ERMP) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in FY 2009, in support of rapid Acquisition Authority (RAA) approved by the secretary of defense in Apr. 17, 2009. Work is to be performed in Poway, Calif., (46 precent), Adelanto, Calif., (14 precent), Palmdale, Calif., (8 precent), Salt Lake City, Utah, (18 precent) and Hunt Valley, Md., (14 precent), with an estimated completion date of May. 21, 2011. One bid was solicited with one bid received. U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-09-C-0151).

The Boeing Co., Saint Louis, Mo., was awarded on Apr. 28, 2009 a $ 10,000,000 cost plus fixed fee contract for the War fighters Information Network-Tactical (WIN-T) Point of Presence (PoP) and the FCS Integrated Computer System (INS). Integrate WIN-T functions (HAIPE & RFNM) with the FCS ICS. Also, integation of the Network Management System (NMS). Work is to be performed in Bloomington, Minn., (93.02 precent), and St. Louis, Mo. (06.98 precent) with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2014. One bid was solicited with one bid received. TACOM Warren, AMSXCC-TAC-AB, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-05-C-0724).

Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control, Orlando, Fla., was awarded on Apr. 27, 2009 a $ 27,040,000 firm fixed price contract for the action for the purchase of M-TAD/PNVS arrowhead kits, partial b-kits, spares and tads electronic display and control (TEDAC). Work is to be performed in Orlando, Fla., with an estimated completion date of Sept. 30, 2011. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Army Contracting Command, AMCOM Contracting Center, CCAM-AP-B, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-06-C-0169).

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY
Grove, Shady Grove, Pa. is being awarded a maximum $46,299,750 fixed price with economic price adjustment, sole source contract for parts. Other location of performance is in Indiana. Using services are Army and Marine Corps. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. There was one proposal originally solicited with one response. The date of performance completion is April 30, 2010. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Columbus (DSCC), Columbus, Ohio (SPM7LX-09-D-9027).

Marathon Alaska Natural Gas Co., Anchorage, Alaska is being awarded a maximum $18,655,121 fixed price with economic price adjustment, sole source contract for direct supply of natural gas. Other locations of performance are in Alaska. Using services are Army, Air Force and federal civilian agencies. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. There was one proposal originally solicited with one response. The date of performance completion is September 30, 2011. The contracting activity is the Defense Energy Support Center (DESC), Fort Belvoir, Va., (SP0600-06-D-7505).

DEFENSE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY
Teledyne Scientific & Imaging LLC, Thousand Oaks, Calif., is being awarded a $8,275,593 cost plus fixed fee contract to develop terahertz electronics for transceiver arrays. Work will be performed in Thousand Oaks, Calif., (70 percent), Santa Barbara, Calif., (12 percent), Tewksbury, Mass., (1 percent), La Jolla, Calif., (3 percent), Pasadena, Calif., (14 percent), and is expected to be completed in April 2011. Funds in the amount of $4,410,000 are being obligated at time of award; of this amount, $2,000,000 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. DARPA issued a solicitation in Federal Business Opportunities on June 13, 2008, and 9 proposals were received. The contracting activity is the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Arlington, Va., (HR0011-09-C-0060).

Microelectronics Advanced Research Corp., (MARCO), Durham, N.C., was awarded on April 28, 2009, a $10,000,000 modification to a previously awarded other transaction agreement for additional funding for phase four of the Focus Center Research Program. Work will be performed in Durham, N.C., (1 percent), Pittsburgh, Pa., (20 percent), Atlanta, Ga., (21 percent), Cambridge, Mass., (19 percent), Berkeley, Calif., (19 percent), and Los Angeles, Calif., (20 percent), and is expected to be completed in January 2010. Funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This is a sole source award. The contracting activity is the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Arlington, Va., (HR0011-07-3-0002, P00009).

Obama Employs New Media Tools to Keep Public Up to Date on N1H1 Flu

American Forces Press Service

May 1, 2009 - In an effort to ensure the public stays up to date on the latest news and information on the H1N1 flu outbreak, White House officals are employing such new media Web and social networking tools as Facebook, MySpace and Twitter. In his last weekly address, President Barack Obama called on government to "recognize that we cannot meet the challenges of today with old habits and stale thinking. We need to reform our government so that it is more efficient, more transparent, and more creative."

Obama pledged to "reach beyond the halls of government" to engage the public. With the H1N1 flu outbreak, White House officials say they are expanding how the administration communicates to ensure they reach the public quickly and effectively.

In addition to WhiteHouse.gov, news and information about the virus can be found on: Facebook.com/WhiteHouse, MySpace.com/WhiteHouse and Twitter.com/WhiteHouse.

The WhiteHouse blog, available at WhiteHouse.gov and by RSS feed, will power a lot of the content in these networks, but officials say they are also looking forward to hearing from fans, friends and followers about Flickr.com/WhiteHouse, Vimeo.com/WhiteHouse, YouTube.com/WhiteHouse and videos and podcasts on iTunes.

Gunnery Sergeant's Name to be Added to Vietnam Veterans Memorial

American Forces Press Service

May 1, 2009 - The name of an American serviceman who died as a result of wounds suffered in combat in the Vietnam War will be inscribed on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial next week, the founder and president of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund announced. Jan C. Scruggs said Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Enrique Valdez's name will be added to Panel 17W, Row 51 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial May 5 at 9 a.m. Valdez's four children are expected to be on hand to watch their father's name being added to The Wall.

"We will add Gunnery Sergeant Valdez's name as close as possible to his date of casualty, so he can remain in the company of those he served with," Scruggs said.

Valdez was a native of Santa Fe, N.M., who enlisted in the Marine Corps in November 1955. He served for 14 years, with several tours of duty in Vietnam. On his last tour, beginning in March 1969, he was serving with the 1st Marine Division's B Company, 1st Battalion. He was wounded Aug. 26, 1969, when his spinal cord was severed by shrapnel. The wound left him quadriplegic, and when Valdez succumbed to pneumonia on Feb. 4, 1994, it Marine Corps officials determined his death to be directly attributable to the wounds he suffered in Vietnam.

In addition to the addition of Valdez's name to The Wall, the designations of five others will be changed, Scruggs said. "Designation" refers to the symbol that has been inscribed beside every name on The Wall. A diamond denotes confirmed death, and a cross represents missing in action. When a servicemember's remains are returned or accounted for, the diamond is superimposed over the cross.

This year, symbols will be changed for Navy Lt. Cmdr. Ralph C. Bisz of Miami; Air Force Senior Master Sgt. James K. Caniford of Frederick, Md.; Air Force Maj. John L. McElroy of Schenectady, N.Y.; Air Force Maj. Barclay B. Young of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; and Air Force Col. David H. Zook Jr. of West Liberty, Ohio.

Next week's change will bring the total number of names on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial to 58,261 men and women who were killed or remain missing in action, Scruggs said.

The new name will become "official" when it is read aloud during the annual Memorial Day Ceremony at the memorial May 25 at 1 p.m.

The Defense Department sets the criteria for and makes decisions about whose names are eligible for inscription on The Wall. The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund pays for the name additions and status changes, and works with the National Park Service to ensure the memorial's long-term preservation and maintenance.

Dedicated on Nov. 13, 1982, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was built to honor all who served with the U.S. armed forces during the Vietnam War. It has become known as an international symbol of healing and is one of the most-visited memorials on the National Mall.