Military News

Saturday, January 17, 2015

Air Force brings ideas to Defense Innovation Initiative



By Amaani Lyle, DoD News, Defense Media Activity / Published January 16, 2015

WASHINGTON (AFNS) -- In dual remarks during the State of the Air Force press briefing here Jan. 15, Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James and the Air Force chief of staff announced plans to bring the service’s research, science and technology ideas to the Defense Innovation Initiative, led by Deputy Secretary of Defense Bob Work.

Gen. Mark Welsh III, the chief of staff, said the overall vision realized will help the Air Force and each of the services reduce costs, maintain a technological edge and enhance the procurement process.

“Under the secretary’s guidance, we’re now putting together a new strategic master plan that includes an annex that is purely science and technology, prioritization, ideas for the future (and) technology we can use to change the way we do business,” Welsh said.

Some of the standard ideas, Welsh noted, include hypersonic technology, directed energy and quantum computing.

“The new advanced engine technology demonstrator is a great example of a place where we could not only get better performance but save maybe as much as 25 percent of fuel costs,” Welsh said. “If we can prove that, we need to get that fuel on as many airplanes as we can afford over a reasonable timeline because that’s a game-changer in cost with the number of hours that we fly airplanes around the world.”

The general said the Air Force should also build on successful efforts in other services such as the Navy.

“We should be looking at laser defense against air-to-air or surface-to-air missiles, we should be exploiting laser communications,” Welsh said. “There are a number of ways that we should be moving forward … this is a great opportunity in my mind (and) the possibilities here are just endless.”

AF safeguards national security in uncertain budget environment



By Claudette Roulo, DoD News, Defense Media Activity / Published January 16, 2015

WASHINGTON (AFNS) -- At the same time the Air Force is navigating a fragile budget environment, it is actively engaged in addressing critical national security issues, Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James said Jan. 15.

Airmen are pursuing the fight against terrorists from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant over the skies of Syria and Iraq, she said during a “State of the Air Force” Pentagon press briefing.

“To date, we have provided more than 60 percent of the 16,000-plus sorties that have been flown,” James noted.

At the same time, she said, the Air Force is ensuring the United States remains dominant in the air and in space and executing missions ranging from intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance to global mobility and global strike.

“We have never wavered … and we certainly won't be wavering in the future,” James said.

But, the secretary said, tough budget decisions have led to an increasingly stressed Air Force.

“The bottom line … is everyone wants more Air Force, and indeed, we have never been busier around the world,” she said. “Demand for our services is way, way up, but we are meeting those demands today with the smallest Air Force in our history.”

When it comes to downsizing, enough is enough, James said.

“We have now downsized as much as we can in support of trying to balance our resources and capabilities,” she said. Already, the secretary added, the Air Force has announced that there would be no involuntary boards to reduce personnel numbers in fiscal year 2015.

“We're actively now working toward an FY '15 goal of maintaining end strength around 350,000 for our active-duty personnel, and that is where we intend to remain,” James said. “If anything, we perhaps need to look about going up in terms of some of our numbers, and that goes for the guard and reserve as well.”

Future Budget Outlook

Last year, James said, the Air Force asked Congress to avoid depleting readiness accounts as it determined the service’s budget priorities.

“Please do not make choices that end up with readiness as the bill-payer, because readiness is too important (and) we have to get our levels back up,” she said of the budget discussions.

Congress ended up approving the majority of the Air Force portion of the fiscal year 2015 defense budget request, the secretary said.

“Indeed, we ended up with a higher top line than our original request, which I think is recognition of just how necessary and valuable our Air Force is in the world today,” James said.

But not all of the Air Force’s requests were approved, she noted.

“Congress restricted our tough choices in the retiring or the reducing of aging force structure,” the secretary said. “But, they did give us the funding that we needed to sustain the operations and to operate near current force structure levels for this year. ... And most importantly, they did not pay for these add-backs from our readiness accounts.”

In the fiscal year 2016 budget request, James said, the Air Force will again ask Congress to not only end sequestration, but also to allow the service to eliminate excess infrastructure.

Congress also denied the Air Force’s fiscal 2015 request to retire platforms such as the A-10 Thunderbolt II attack aircraft. The secretary noted that she did not regret the request, despite the aircraft’s role in the air operations against ISIL.

“The current … operation against (ISIL) -- there are a number of strike platforms that are engaged in it. A-10 is one, but there are also F-16's, F-15's and so forth. They're each contributing,” she said. It just makes good sense to use the aircraft while it is in the inventory, James added.

The fiscal 2016 budget request will reflect the existing operating environment, she said.

“We are constantly monitoring what's going on in the world (and) we are constantly making adjustments as a result. It's safe to say that the budget submission ... will reflect some of those changes,” she said. “And in terms of the retiring of the older aircraft and will the plan be identical to what it was -- I doubt it will be identical, but there will be some similarities.”

In addition, the Air Force will “ask Congress to resource our manpower requirements to meet mission, force structure and readiness needs to support the combatant commanders,” the secretary said, noting that she will be able to be more specific after the budget request is released.

The American people expect the Air Force to be able to fly, fight and win against any adversary, James said. “So it is important that we continue to afford our nation the Air Force capability it needs well into the future by appropriately investing in our people and in our platforms.”