Military News

Saturday, February 06, 2010

Gates: Iran's Nuke Program Puts Middle East at Risk

By Fred W. Baker III
American Forces Press Service

Feb. 6, 2010 - Iran's nuclear program continues to put security in the Middle East at risk despite international pressure to halt its efforts, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said here today. "Iran is in violation of the nuclear nonproliferation treaty, and I think there is a very great worry that if Iran ... proceeds with this program unconstrained, there is a very real danger of proliferation here in the region that would make it even more unstable and more unsafe for everyone," Gates said at a roundtable with traveling U.S. and Turkish press.

The secretary flew here yesterday after a meeting with other defense ministers in Istanbul. His comments come on the heels of a warning by U.S. National Security Advisor James L. Jones at a conference in Munich, where Jones called Iran's nuclear program a global threat.

The secretary praised President Barack Obama's diplomatic efforts toward Iran, saying he has never seen an administration reach out in as principled and comprehensive a way as the president has. But, Gates added, "the response has been quite disappointing."

Gates said the United States has no objection to Iran having a nuclear program that complies with the nuclear nonproliferation treaty, but believes it is using its program to develop a nuclear weapon.

"They have done nothing to reassure the international community that they are prepared to comply with the NPT or stop their progress toward a nuclear weapon," Gates said. "Therefore, I think that various nations need to think about whether the time has come for a different tack."

The International Atomic Energy Agency had offered to exchange Iran's lower-grade uranium for a higher grade that can be used for medical purposes. In the deal, Iran would turn over 1,200 kilograms of low-enriched uranium. Russia and France would enrich the uranium for use at a medical research reactor in Tehran.

Gates said Iran has rejected the offer, despite recent claims by Iranian officials that a deal is close to being reached.

"We had hoped that the Tehran research reactor proposal offered a way out of the current situation in a way that would be satisfactory to all the parties," he said.

Gates called for tougher sanctions on the country if it does not comply with the terms of the agreement in an effort to bring Iran back to the negotiating table.

"Iran is the only country in the region that has publicly declared its intent to destroy another state in the region. This is not encouraging for a country that has a nuclear program, to say the least," he said. "So I think there is a broad international agreement ... to get Iran to stop this program."

Turkey sits on Iran's western border and is in a unique position to influence Iran, Gates said.

During his one-day stop here, Gates met with Turkish Defense Minister Vecdi Gonul to discuss the war in Afghanistan, NATO's plans for a missile defense system and U.S.-Turkish military relations.

Gates said he did not press Turkish officials for more troops in Afghanistan. The secretary said he is impressed by the Turkish contributions so far. The country has about 1,700 troops in Afghanistan, with two provincial reconstruction teams and several mentoring teams.

Military and Police Books of the Year

Between the three websites, more than 2,200 American Heroes and their books are listed.

February 6, 2010, (San Dimas, CA) American Heroes Press, the publishers of www.military-writers.com, www.police-writers.com and www.firefighter-writers.com, announced the results of their annual recognition.

About the Websites
Military-Writers.com is a website that lists servicemembers from all branches of the United States Armed Forces who have authored books. Currently, the site lists 1146 servicemembers and their more than 3,700 books. Servicemembers are listed by name, branch, rank and type of book.

Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local law enforcement officials who have written books. Currently, the website lists 1,082 state or local police officers and their more than 2,300 books. Law enforcement officials are listed by name, department and type of book. Additionally, the website has separate sections which list federal law enforcement officials, international police officers and civilian police personnel.

FireFighter-Writers.com lists American firefighters and other emergency services personnel who have authored books. Currently, the site lists 22 firefighters and over 200 books.

About the Awards
The Military-Writers.com Book of Year 2010 focuses solely on the written contribution made by the servicemember. It is that book found by the panel of judges to be the most significant literary contribution made by a servicemember in the previous year.

The Police-Writers.com Book of the Year 2010 focuses solely on the written contribution made by the police officer. It is that book found by the panel of judges to be the most significant literary contribution made by a police officer in the previous year.

The Military-Writers.com 2010 Book of the Year
Ride the Thunder: A Vietnam War Story of Honor and Triumph authored by former Major Richard Botkin, USMC, is the Military-Writers.com Book of the Year.

Former United States Marine Corps Major Richard Botkin “graduated from the University of Michigan's School of Business. He served from 1980 to 1995 on active and reserve duty as a Marine Corps infantry officer with units to include 2nd Battalion 7th Marines, 1st Reconnaissance Battalion, and 4th Force Reconnaissance Company. His understanding for Southeast Asia has been enhanced by the nine medical/dental mission trips he helped to organize and lead to Cambodia between 1998 and 2007, and four trips to Vietnam, including one with his main Vietnamese character Le Ba Binh, to specifically do research for Ride the Thunder. Richard Botkin currently lives with his family in northern California, where he is an investment advisor for a major brokerage firm.” Richard Botkin is the author of Ride the Thunder: A Vietnam War Story of Honor and Triumph.

According to the book description of Ride the Thunder: A Vietnam War Story of Honor and Triumph, “Richard Botkin breaks new ground in telling the heroic story of a few American and Vietnamese Marines who fought brilliantly and turned the tide of the Vietnam War, only to have policymakers surrender the battlefield. Botkin recounts the exploits of the American Marines and their Vietnamese allies who were largely responsible for thwarting the North Vietnamese invasion of the northern portions of South Vietnam - known as the 'Easter Offensive of 1972' in the West that was intended to bring the nation to its knees. These are the men who 'rode the thunder' and almost saved a nation. Botkin tells the story of Captain John Ripley's daring raid to destroy the Dong Ha Bridge; Major Le Ba Binh and his seven hundred Marines bravely holding off more than 20 thousand North Vietnamese troops; Lieutenant Colonel Gerry Turley's leadership and bravery that helped thwart the Easter Offensive - and much more.”

The Police-Writers.com Book of the Year 2010
The Sixth Session authored by Lieutenant Joe Hefferon, Essex County Sheriff’s Office, is the Police-Writers.com Book of the Year.

Lieutenant Joe Hefferon of the Essex County Sheriff’s Office is a 22 year veteran of law enforcement who is currently assigned to the office of the chief. He “has been a police officer for more than twenty-two years. His experiences have given him access to the scarier hallways of the human psyche, helping to layer his narrative with poignancy, grit, and dark humor. Joe Hefferon is the proud parent of two beautiful children, Jack and Kaitlin.” Lieutenant Joe Hefferon is the author of The Sixth Session.

According to the book description of The Sixth Session, “Newspaper man Carter Jackson forms an unlikely alliance with Detective Brooke Enright to stop the awful killing of children while reconciling their own inner torment. Carter is reeling over the death of his beloved wife and immerses himself in the brutal investigation, set against one bitter cold December. The Sixth Session will make you think about the best and worst of human capacities. It will make you want to fall in love again, even with all its tragic consequences.”

American Heroes Press Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Guard Supports Washington Blizzard Response

American Forces Press Service

Feb. 6, 2010 - More than 100 soldiers and airmen from the District of Columbia National Guard were on duty yesterday and today supporting the district's emergency response to a weekend blizzard.

The Guard members are transporting patients and doctors to area hospitals, taking Metro Police officers to and from work throughout the city and even transported Metro Police Chief Cathy Lanier to a shooting scene on Stanton Avenue.

Officials said Guard personnel are expected to remain on duty through Feb. 9 in support of one of the worst blizzards in the history of the national capital region.

"This is our job, and this is what we do," said Army Maj. Gen. Errol R. Schwartz, commanding general of the D.C. Guard Joint Force Headquarters. "We have always answered the call for help from the District of Columbia at a moment's notice, and our people have done a tremendous job in supporting emergency missions during this historic blizzard."

D.C. National Guard personnel were needed to drive a dozen Humvees to Metro Police precincts throughout the city today, and they proved to be invaluable as the storm worsened and roadways became impassable. In addition to the Humvees, support personnel were stationed at the district's armory and at the D.C. Homeland Security Emergency Management Agency, which was the hub of the city's response to the storm.

Airman Tells Cancer Survival Story


By Air Force Master Sgt. Martie Moore
Special to American Forces Press Service

Feb. 5, 2010 - Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Ronnie Barham, the 506th Air Expeditionary Group chief enlisted manager here, recalled a day seven years ago involving another noncommissioned officer now serving with him in Iraq. "He had a tube down his nose; IVs in his arms, had lost a lot of weight and was heavily medicated," Barham said. "He looked really rough, and he looked up at me and said, 'I'm comin' back, Chief.'"

Air Force Tech. Sgt. Mark Duran didn't know how sick he was at the time.

"I had a dry cough and couldn't stay warm. I just thought I had the flu," recalled Duran, now a 506th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron structures technician who'd deployed to Iraq from the 301st Civil Engineer Squadron at Joint Reserve Field Carswell-Fort Worth, Texas.

The cough lasted about three months before high fevers started setting in, and Duran's friends finally convinced him to go to the doctor. The X-rays revealed his spleen was three times its normal size. He was diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease.

According to the National Cancer Association, the disease's symptoms include the painless enlargement of lymph nodes, spleen or other immune tissue. Other warning signs, which Duran developed, include fever, weight loss, fatigue and night sweats.

When the doctor told him he had cancer, Duran didn't look at it as a death sentence. He had a 30-percent chance of survival.

"I didn't realize it was as bad as it was," he said. "When the doctor told us it was Stage 4, I thought, 'Well that has to be the least serious. Stage 1 must be the worst. I was near death and totally ignorant about how serious it was."

The stage of a cancer, usually measured on a scale of 1 to 4, indicates of how much the cancer has spread. The stage often takes into account the size of a tumor, how deeply it has penetrated, whether it has invaded adjacent organs, and whether it has spread to the lymph nodes or distant organs.

Duran said he believes the doctor didn't convey the gravity of the diagnosis because he thought he might lose hope.

"He didn't realize how strong my Christian faith is," the airman said.

Duran had surgery Jan. 8, 2004, to remove his spleen and gall bladder, which was 80-percent cancerous.

"It was beyond a Stage 4. There's no such thing as a 5," Duran said. "I still question why I'm still here, but I'm here for a purpose."

After surgery and chemotherapy treatments, Duran was not prepared for what came next.

"The hardest part was paying for it. It was catastrophic," he said. "Every chemo treatment is $7,000." After insurance, Duran still had $50,000 in medical bills to pay out of his pocket.

As a civilian, Duran works for the Birdville Independent School District in Texas, and he has been in the Air Force Reserve for 26 years. Although family and friends tried to help, it just wasn't enough. He chose to file bankruptcy.

"Between the cancer and bankruptcy, it changed the importance of things in my life," Duran said. "I saw what I owned and what wasn't important and what really is important, like relationships with family and friends. It strengthened my relationship with my wife and even my in-laws. With my in-laws, I'm no longer a son-in-law. I'm a son to them."

Serving his country also is high on Duran's priority list.

"I never intended to get out, but I thought the military might force me out," he said.

Duran's reserve commander and Barham wrote letters to the medical review board, urging them to retain Duran, and it worked.

"From the beginning, I said I'm going to do my 33 years," Duran said.

"He really loves the military and is proud to serve," Barham said. "We wrote the letter so he could still serve, and he volunteered to come here as a structural augmentee. Back home, he is an electrician."

Duran has been in Iraq for more than four months and said he is glad he volunteered to deploy.

"I'm part of a good thing, and I couldn't be surrounded by a better group of people," he said.

Duran credits his positive attitude and faith for keeping him cancer-free for the past six years. Meanwhile, he has been grateful for every moment.

"Don't take your life for granted," he said. "There's not always a tomorrow."

(Air Force Master Sgt. Martie Moore serves in the 506th Air Expeditionary Group public affairs office.)

Two Former Elected Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribal Officials Convicted of Conspiracy and Embezzlement from the Tribe


Fourteen Convicted Following Investigation of Financial Activities of Cheyenne-Arapaho Business Committee

February 6, 2010 - OKLAHOMA CITY—Today, a federal jury found WILLIAM F. BLIND, JR. (a/k/a “Bill Blind”), 68, and his wife, VINITA H. SANKEY, 60, both of Canton, Oklahoma, guilty of conspiracy and embezzlement of more than $150,000 of funds belonging to the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma (“Tribes”), including net gaming revenues derived from the Lucky Star Casinos, announced Sanford C. Coats, United States Attorney for the Western District of Oklahoma.

“These defendants used their elected positions within the Tribe to take funds for improper and personal use,” said U.S. Attorney Coats. “Tribal elected officials must be held to the same standard as other elected government officials. I commend the FBI agents and prosecutors who worked diligently on these cases for six years in order to expose this corruption and to bring these 14 defendants to justice.”

Blind and Sankey were elected to the Tribe’s Business Committee as representatives for the Arapaho District One (A-1) in 1998 and served on the Business Committee until 2006. Blind and Sankey also had served as Tribal Tax Commissioners. Blind served for a period as Tribal Chairman and Sankey served for a period as Tribal Secretary.

Evidence at trial showed that, between 2000 and 2006, Blind and Sankey conspired to embezzle tribal funds entrusted to them by virtue of their elected positions through submission of various travel claims for expenses related to conferences they did not attend, improper reimbursements, and payment for expenses of relatives to which they were not entitled.

In addition, evidence showed that tribal funds were used to purchase cashiers’ checks from which cash was retained for personal use, and that checks were improperly drawn on the Tribal operating and tax accounts for personal use. Also, evidence showed that tribal funds were used to purchase various vehicles (including a 2001 Dodge Pickup, 2002 Lincoln Town Car, Chrysler 300 M, and a 2003 Dodge 1500 Quad Cab Pickup), two riding lawn mowers, and a portable storage building, which were not returned to the Tribes upon leaving office. In total, more than $150,000 of Tribal funds were embezzled or converted.

The pair was originally indicted in November of 2008. The trial lasted six days and the jury deliberated about six hours before finding Sankey guilty of conspiracy and 21 counts of embezzlement. The jury found Blind guilty of conspiracy and eight counts of embezzlement and found him not guilty on a single count of embezzlement.

At sentencing, Blind and Sankey each face up to five years in federal prison, a $250,000 fine, and restitution on each count. Sentencing for both defendants has been set for May 5, 2010.

Related Case Prosecution Summary

The case against Blind and Sankey arose out of a long-term investigation of financial activities of the 33rd Cheyenne-Arapaho Business Committee which has also resulted in the conviction of the following individuals in prior separate cases:



• Robert Tabor, 62, of Calumet, Oklahoma, pled guilty to conspiracy to embezzle more than $114,000 of net gaming revenues derived from the Lucky Star Casinos. Tabor was the Arapaho District A-2 elected representative and Chairman of the Cheyenne-Arapaho Business Committee. In April of 2008 he was sentenced to serve 12 months in federal prison and was ordered to pay $114,376.47 in restitution. (Case No. CR-07-211)

• Colleen Tabor, 49, of Calumet, Oklahoma, pled guilty to embezzlement of $7,646.60 of Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribal funds derived from the Lucky Star Casinos. She was the wife of Robert Tabor. In April of 2008 she was sentenced to serve four years' probation and pay $7,646.60 in restitution. (Case No. CR-07-211)

• James Wayne Pedro, Sr., 69, of El Reno, Oklahoma, pled guilty to embezzling gaming revenues from the Lucky Star Casinos and also pled guilty to making a fraudulent statement to HUD. Pedro was an elected member of the Business Committee of the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma. In April of 2006 he was sentenced to 30 months in federal prison and ordered to pay $193,235.77 in restitution to the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma and $6,277 to the Oklahoma Housing and Finance Agency. (Case No. CR-05-203)

• Peggy Bigpond, 53, of Concho, Oklahoma, pled guilty to unlawfully receiving and converting gaming revenues from the Lucky Star Casinos to her own use. Bigpond worked as Pedro’s secretary during a portion of his term of office on the Business Committee of the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma. In April of 2006 Bigpond was sentenced to 16 months in federal prison and ordered to pay $32,276.66 in restitution to the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma. (Case No. CR-05-204)

• Lea E. Schantz, 42, of El Reno, Oklahoma, pled guilty to receiving and converting gaming revenues from the Lucky Star Casinos, knowing that the funds had been embezzled. Schantz also pled guilty to making a false statement to HUD. In April of 2006 Schantz was sentenced to serve eight months in federal prison and ordered to pay $48,434 and $6,277 in restitution. (Case No. CR-05-205)

• Vera E. Franklin, 55, of El Reno, Oklahoma, pled guilty to embezzlement of $7,000 of Cheyenne-Arapaho net gaming revenues from the Lucky Star Casinos. Franklin was an elected member of the Business Committee of the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma, serving as the Cheyenne District 2 representative. Franklin was sentenced in October 2007 to serve one month in federal prison and pay $7,000 in restitution. (Case No. CR-07-73)

• Louella Oldbear, 56, of Del City, Oklahoma, was convicted by a jury in November 2007 of embezzling over $17,000 and making a false statement to the FBI about the use of Cheyenne-Arapaho tribal money to purchase vehicles. She was sentenced to serve 12 months and one day in federal prison and ordered to pay $17,064.94 in restitution to the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes, and serve three years of supervised release and perform 104 hours of community service following her release from prison. Oldbear was Secretary to a Cheyenne-Arapaho Business Committee member. (Case No. CR-07-77).

• Renee Island, 43, of Calumet, Oklahoma, was convicted by a jury in January of 2008 of conspiracy and embezzlement of Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribal funds derived from the Lucky Star Casinos involving transfers of tribal funds between January and September 2003. She was sentenced to serve 10 months in prison and pay $34,837.38 in restitution to the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes and serve three years of supervised release following her release from prison. Island was employed by the Cheyenne-Arapaho A-2 District as the secretary to Robert Tabor. (Case No. CR-07-49)

• Edward Dunn Whiteskunk, 51, of Hammond, Oklahoma, pled guilty to embezzling net gaming revenues from the Lucky Star Casinos. He was sentenced to serve one year and one day in prison, pay $98,865.97 in restitution to the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes and serve three years of supervised release following his release from prison. Whiteskunk served as a member of the Cheyenne-Arapaho Business Committee and was the elected representative of the Cheyenne District 4. (Case No. CR-08-35)

• Roy D. Bullcoming, 54, of Seiling, Oklahoma, pled guilty to embezzlement of net gaming revenues from the Lucky Star Casinos. He was sentenced to serve 36 months in prison, pay $101,585.68 in restitution to the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes and serve three years of supervised release following his release from prison. Bullcoming served as a Business Committee Representative of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes, representing the tribal membership of Cheyenne District 1. He also served as a ceremonial Peace Chief for the Cheyenne Tribe. (Case No. CR-08-55).

• Eugene Blackbear, Jr., 56, of Watonga, Oklahoma, pled guilty to embezzlement from the Lucky Star Casinos. He was sentenced to serve five years' probation and pay $14,843.51 in restitution to the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes. Blackbear was an employee of the Tribes. (Case No. CR-08-141)

• Robert Roy Woods, Sr., 64, of El Reno, Oklahoma, pled guilty to defrauding Social Security by failing to report income he was earning from the Arapaho District One (A-1) office for his self-employed labor. Woods was sentenced to serve three year's probation and pay $13,312.86 in restitution to the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes. (Case No. CR-07-024)

All of these cases are the result of investigations conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and were prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Jim Robinson and Arvo Mikkanen.

MILITARY CONTRACTS February 5, 2010

ARMY

GM GDLS Defense Group, LLC, JV, Sterling Heights, Mich., was awarded on Jan. 28, 2010, a $253,329,165 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract. This action is for a new follow-on contractor logistics support delivery order 0019 Mod DS. The contractor shall provide contractor logistics support for Stryker Family of Vehicles in both garrison and deployment locations. The period of performance is from March 1, 2010, through Feb. 28, 2011. Work is to be performed in various locations with an estimated completion date of Feb. 28, 2011. One bid was solicited with one bid received. TACOM Contracting Center, CCTA-IL, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-07-D-M112).

The Boeing Co., Mesa, Ariz., was awarded on Feb. 1, 2010, a $108,550,867 firm-fixed-price requirement contract to support Corpus Christi Army Depot in the overhaul, repair and recapitalization of the AH-64/H-47 weapon systems. Work is to be performed in Corpus Christi, Texas, with an estimated completion date of Jan. 31, 2015. One bid solicited with one bid received. Aviation and Missile Command Contracting Center, CCAM-AL-D, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-10-D-0027).

The Boeing Co., Mesa, Ariz., was awarded on Jan. 28, 2010, a $99,270,307 firm-fixed-price contract to exercise the option for 13 aircraft in Lot 14. Work is to be performed in Mesa, Ariz., with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2013. One bid was solicited with one bid received. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aviation and Missile Command Contracting Center, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-06-C-0093).

DRS Sustainment Systems, Inc., St. Louis, Mo., was awarded on Feb. 3, 2010, a $93,694,518 firm-fixed-price contract to award delivery order 0002, which is an order of 275 M1000 trailers. Work is to be performed in St. Louis, Mo., with an estimated completion date of May 30, 2012. One bid was solicited with one bid received. U.S. Army Contracting Command, TACOM, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-09-D-0107).

Oshkosh Corp., Oshkosh, Wis., was awarded on Feb. 1, 2010, an $84,739,677 firm-fixed-price contract for the partial exercise of the option for 627 explosively formed penetrator kits on the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected All Terrain Vehicle. Work is to be performed in Oshkosh, Wis., with an estimated completion date of May 31, 2012. Five bids were solicited with five bids received. TACOM, AMSCC-TAC-ADCA, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-09-D-0111).

AIR FORCE

Boeing Co., Seal Beach, Calif., was awarded a $75,939,504 contract which will provide for Global Positioning Satellite GPS IIF Space Vehicle, sustainment and operational control segment support for calendar year 2010. At this time, $25,000,000 has been obligated. GPSW/PK, El Segundo, Calif., is the contracting activity (F04701-96-C-0025, P00532).

Northrop Grumman System Corp., San Diego, Calif., was awarded a $5,935,099 contract which will provide performance for engineering, manufacturing and development activities in support of the Global Hawk program. At this time, the entire amount has been obligated. 303 AESG/SYK, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity (F33657-01-C-4600,P00349).

NAVY

Bell-Boeing Joint Program Office, Amarillo, Texas, is being awarded a $70,004,000 cost-plus-fixed-fee repair contract for repairs in support of the V-22 aircraft. Work will be performed in Ridley Park, Pa. (50 percent), and Fort Worth, Texas (50 percent), and is expected to be completed by June 2012. Contract funds will not expire before the end of the fiscal year. This contract was not competitively awarded. The Naval Inventory Control Point, Philadelphia, Pa., is the contracting activity (N00383-10-D-003N).

Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., Fort Worth, Texas, is being awarded an undefinitized advance acquisition contract with an estimated value of $50,394,000 for long lead materials and components associated with the manufacture and delivery of 18 Lot 8 UH-1Y build new aircraft, eight Lot 8 AH-1Z remanufactured aircraft, and two Lot 8 AH-1Z build new aircraft. Work will be performed in Fort Worth, Texas (60 percent), and Amarillo, Texas (40 percent), and is expected to be completed in January 2014. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity (N00019-10-C-0015).

Nova Group, Inc., Napa, Calif., is being awarded $8,175,000 for firm-fixed-price task order #0002 under a previously awarded multiple award construction contract (N62473-06-D-1005) for construction of an aircraft direct fueling station and the installation of one emergency generator set at the Naval Air Facility El Centro. Work will be performed in El Centro, Calif., and is expected to be completed by January 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Five proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity.

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

RD Buie Enterprises, Boerne, Texas (SPM8E6-10-D-0003); Middle Atlantic Wholesale Lumber, Owings Mills, Md. (SPM8E6-10-D-0004); Sylvan Forest Products, Portland, Ore. (SPM8E6-10-D-0005); and S&S Forest Products, Boerne, Texas, are each being awarded a maximum $10,248,249 firm-fixed-price, total set-aside, tailored logistics support contract for wood products for the eastern region. There are no other locations of performance. Using services are Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and federal civilian agencies. The original proposal was Web solicited with 16 responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract includes a two-year base and three one-year options. The date of performance completion is Feb. 4, 2012. The Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., is the contracting activity (SPM8E6-10-D-0006).