Military News

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Coping with loss

Commentary by Tech. Sgt. Benjamin Rojek
Joint Task Force-Bravo Public Affairs

8/24/2010 - SOTO CANO AIR BASE, Honduras -- I didn't know them. Not personally, anyway.

But when two members of a base with little more than 600 people die, it's hard not to be affected.

On Aug. 2, I had to photograph the ceremonial loading and departure of the remains of two 1-228th Aviation Regiment Soldiers who died recently in an off-base car accident.

Even though Army Sgts. Luis Brito and Leodegario Lizárraga didn't die in combat, or even because of it, their deaths were tragic and left unexpected holes in the lives of many.

I was going to write this commentary as a message on safe driving to tell you, the reader, to take care on the road, be aware of your surroundings, etc. While that's all good advice and something to consider while you're on the road here or anywhere else in the world, what's more important immediately after a tragedy like this is making sure you seek help if you need it.

I've lost friends to vehicle accidents throughout the years -- car, motorcycle and boat -- and it never gets easier. And though my heart still aches that I'll never be able to see those people again -- never be able to laugh with them or play X-Box with them or tell them what good friends they were, I always take comfort in the fact that I still have friends with whom I can talk. There are still family members and buddies who will understand my grief, take the time to share memories of our departed comrades, and be there to lean on.

Even if you're not personally affected by a loss, you should still offer up your help. If you're a supervisor, take the time to talk to your troops. If one of your friends or co-workers seems down, take him aside and check up on him. Be good battle buddies and wingmen, and remind your friends that they can talk to you.

When a friend or co-worker does turn to you, don't offer false comforts, though.

According to Mental Health America, "It doesn't help the grieving person to say ... 'You'll get over it in time.' Instead, offer a simple expression of sorrow and take time to listen."

Mental Health America's website also states that effective coping includes telling your friends and family how you feel.

As a military member, you may be in a remote location where you feel like you don't have anyone, but one of the great things about being a servicemember is that you do have people to talk to, from chaplains to mental health professionals.

Whether you're looking for advice or just an ear to listen, the military offers resources to help you work through your time of grief and loss. Take advantage of them.

Always remember that asking for help and talking about your feelings are not signs of weakness; those actions are important for your health.

Whenever the military suffers a loss, no matter the mission, location or number of people, it is a difficult period of adjustment. In these times, we must take care of each other, reach out a hand, and most importantly, accept the help.

Former professional baseball player says Air Guard is his winning team

by Air Force Master Sgt. Desiree Twombly
Arizona National Guard

8/24/2010 - TUSCON, Ariz. (AFNS) -- When Staff Sgt. Trevor Harvey lights the candles on the altar before Mass on drill weekends, he favors the hand that once pitched to Ken Griffey Jr.

"During one game I pitched, he hit a ball over 500 feet," said Sergeant Harvey, who now serves as the chaplain's assistant with the Arizona Air National Guard's 162nd Fighter Wing here.

Originally from Imlay City, Mich., Sergeant Harvey started playing baseball at age 7, and he excelled in the sport. Throughout high school, he played varsity baseball. Just before graduation, word spread quickly to local scouts about the 6-foot-5-inch left hander.

During games, Sergeant Harvey noticed scouts in the stands with radar guns.

"Every time I threw a fast ball, the radar guns would come up," he said. "As the games went on, and through the end of the season, it wasn't unusual to see more than 30 guys with radar guns in the stands. I knew then something neat was going to happen."

Shortly thereafter, he received more than 200 letters from colleges from all over the country asking him to play. Sergeant Harvey was drafted by the Seattle Mariners right out of high school, but he chose to go to Michigan State University to play with the Spartans.

"One of the stipulations for signing a professional contract was a clause stating that injury would void the contract," he said. "That meant my education would not be paid for. My parents did not think it was a good idea, given that I already had a scholarship waiting in Michigan."

Sergeant Harvey played for Michigan State from 1990 to 1995.

"I got my education paid for, and I got an opportunity to travel and play baseball against different schools like Arizona, Texas and Florida," he said. "It was awesome."

His senior year in college proved to be a successful one. He received invitations to try out for the Montreal Expos, Detroit Tigers and the Baltimore Orioles.

A small independent Canadian team called the Brandon Grey Owls ultimately made him an offer he couldn't refuse.

"I was offered a stipend of $700 a month and a place to live," he said. At age 22, that was a big deal."

He played a few games for the Owls, but it wasn't long before a scout from the Colorado Rockies took notice of the left-handed pitcher. They made him an offer, and he was on his way to play for the Rockies.

Shortly after signing his professional contract, Sergeant Harvey popped his shoulder out of its socket. Recovery was expected to take 18 months.

"The Rockies weren't willing to wait," he said.

His professional baseball endeavor was put on hold, and as a result of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, his motivations changed.

"I had an epiphany after 9/11," Sergeant Harvey said. "I felt moved by the events and the reactions of the people in my generation. I had to get involved."

In 2003, he enlisted in the Michigan Air National Guard. Three years later, he relocated with his family to Tucson, Ariz., and joined the 162nd Fighter Wing. He considered a chaplaincy with the Army Guard until he was scouted by the chaplain's office here.

"When you play baseball, everyone on the team wears the same uniform, and you help each other out," Sergeant Harvey said. "That is everything that the Air Force is about. It was such an easy transition. I have loved every minute of my time in the Air Force.

"If I had to do it all again," he added, "I would have given up the Michigan State experience and enlisted at age 18. That is how much I love what I do now."

CNO Visits Norway, Sweden

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Kyle P. Malloy, Chief of Naval Operations Public Affairs

STOCKHOLM (NNS) -- The chief of naval operations (CNO) visited Norway and Sweden to strengthen maritime partnerships and international relationships Aug. 16-20.

While in Norway, CNO Adm. Gary Roughead visited his counterpart, Chief of the Royal Norwegian Navy Rear Adm. Haakon Bruun-Hanssen, and had the opportunity to tour two Norwegian navy ships, Nansen-class frigate HNoMS Otto Sverdrup and the Skjold-class corvette HNoMS Skudd.

Impressed with the Norwegian navy, Roughead also had the opportunity to meet with Norwegian Defense Minister Grete Faremo in Oslo to discuss allied training, the northern regions and cooperation with the United States.

Roughead then made his way to Sweden to tour Swedish ships, including the Visby Corvette-class HSwMS Nykoping and the Gothenburg Corvette-class HMS Gavle. He also visited the HSwMS Sodermanland, the first submarine in Swedish naval history to have a female commanding officer, Lt. Cmdr. Paula Wallenburg.

Roughead said Wallenburg sets the standard for women in the future of the U.S. Navy submarine force and that Sailors and officers alike could learn from her experiences.

"I think what Paula (Wallenburg) has achieved is a significant achievement for navies around the world," said Roughead.

CNO also met with his Swedish counterpart, Rear Adm. Anders Grenstad, to discuss present and future operations between the two navies in the region and around the globe.

"Sweden is a role model for its willingness to assume international responsibility for the safety of the world's oceans. Something that the Swedish navy's efforts in the Gulf of Aden show," said Roughead.

Roughead said he is always looking at ways to make the U.S. Navy better and meeting with his counterparts in Norway and Sweden greatly enhance the safety, security and prosperity around the world.

"It is great for me to come and see first hand the terrific professionalism of these Sailors and officers, and it's been a wonderful couple of days," said Roughead.

Sailors, It's All About You

By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (AW) LaTunya Howard, Navy Personnel Command Public Affairs

MILLINGTON, Tenn. (NNS) -- Navy Personnel Command (NPC) has an all new "My Personnel Information" link on the NPC homepage, directing Sailors to a single grouping of web links for personnel information and career management.

"This is all about the individual Sailor," said Capt. Hank Vitali, director of the Personnel Services Delivery Transformation Office at the Bureau of Naval Personnel.

"The 'My Personnel Information' page (the first listing under quick links) is a first step in response to requests from the fleet for a single self-service-online site for personnel service delivery capabilities," Vitali said. "We've heard the fleet loud and clear and are working to develop an enhanced 'portal' that provides Sailors direct access to the most commonly used applications and sources of career information."

The "My Personnel Information" page has four main functions; personnel records, self-support, training and education, and Customer Service Center support. Sailors can access their official military personnel file, their physical readiness information, submit an electronic-leave request, enter the Defense Travel System or request a Sailor/Marine American Council on Education Registry Transcript.

"There are 20 links to personnel records information, self service and support sites, training and education, customer service - even post-incident personnel accountability via the Navy Family and Accountability System," said Vitali. "We'll leverage the feedback and lessons learned from the 'My Personnel Information' page into the requirements for the future Navy Human Resources Portal under development for our active and Reserve Sailors."

Missions Show U.S. Commitment in Pacific, Latin America

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

Aug. 24, 2010 - As the U.S. military conducts disaster response operations in flood-stricken Pakistan, it's also engaged in major humanitarian and civic assistance missions in the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean. These missions -- U.S. Pacific Command's Pacific Partnership 2010 and U.S. Southern Command's Continuing Promise 2010 –- are demonstrating U.S. commitment to the regions, their mission commanders told American Forces Press Service.

As U.S. servicemembers deliver medical, dental, engineering and veterinary services to some of the world's neediest regions, they're bolstering long-standing relationships and building new ones.

They're also providing critical groundwork for the United States to work collaboratively with its international, interagency and non-governmental partners to conduct an effective response should a disaster strike, the commanders said.

Pacific Partnership 2010, which moves into its final phase today, is the fifth in a series of missions launched after a devastating tsunami in 2005. "Our leadership wanted to continue to come back to this region every year to foster the relationships we built during that stressful time and help us become better prepared, collectively, to respond to those kinds of disasters in the future," said Navy Capt. Lisa Franchetti, the mission commander.

Continuing Promise 2010, six weeks into its four-month mission, also is reinforcing lessons learned and relationships built during devastating natural disasters.

The crew of the USS Kearsarge was diverted from its scheduled Continuing Promise mission in 2008 to provide disaster relief assistance after a string of severe hurricanes hit Haiti. The USNS Comfort visited Haiti last April as part of Continuing Promise 2009. Its crew returned to Haiti this January to provide disaster relief and humanitarian assistance following the 7.0 magnitude earthquake.

"That is the true magic of this mission – the interactions, the relationships, the partnerships established through the work we do," said Navy Capt. Thomas M. Negus, commander of the USS Iwo Jima and mission commander for Continuing Promise 2010. "We really are demonstrating our commitment to our neighborhood through our everyday actions."

Here's an insight into these two missions, and the impact they are having on two highly strategic regions.

Pacific Partnership 2010

The hospital ship USNS Mercy is in Timor-Leste wrapping up the last leg of the four-month Pacific Partnership mission today. Since leaving San Diego May 1, the 894-foot-long, 69,000-ton floating hospital also has visited Vietnam, Cambodia and Indonesia.

The Mercy's crew includes about 800 military medical, dental and engineering specialists and civilian volunteers, Mercy said, that have worked closely together to accomplish myriad outreach projects.

Speaking by phone from Dili, Timor-Leste's capital, she described the magnitude of what they've accomplished to date: treating more than 95,000 patients, conducting more than 700 surgeries and completing 26 construction projects.

During Mercy's visit to Cambodia, a first for Pacific Partnership, its embarked engineers fanned out into three remote communities to drill three wells that Franchetti said will provide fresh drinking water to 35,000 people.

In addition, she said, crewmembers presented about 10,000 hours of professional training in specific topics requested by the host countries, mostly related to medical care.

Meanwhile, veterinarians from the Army and two non-governmental organizations provided services ashore. And Mercy's bio-medical technicians helped repair broken equipment at each port call, while also teaching people on the ground how to conduct their own maintenance.

Most of the more complex medical procedures, Franchetti said, were conducted directly aboard Mercy, a converted oil tanker now equipped with a helicopter flight deck, specialized laboratories, 12 operating rooms, an 80-bed intensive-care unit and beds for 1,000 patients.

But many of the other missions were conducted in relatively deep into the host nation's territory, Franchetti said, thanks to capabilities lent by embarked U.S. helicopters as well as two Australian heavy landing craft.

As she acknowledged the scope of their work and the sheer numbers of people treated and civic action projects completed, Franchetti emphasized that numbers aren't what really counts in Pacific Partnership.

"This is really about building relationships out here," she said. "And every time we come back, it reinforces our relationships ... All of our initiatives that we have here are continuing to strengthen the relationships we have around the world, with both our partner nations that participate, as well as the host nations that invite us to come and do Pacific Partnership with them."

Pacom, working through U.S. Pacific Fleet, launched the Pacific Partnership initiative after the 2005 tsunami to build on relationships built and ensure future preparedness.

"This deployment offers an incredible opportunity to continue to build the relationships and capabilities that will be essential to responding to a real-world disaster in the region," Franchetti said.

Mercy will leave Timor-Leste today to begin the transit home to San Diego. But the mission will continue as Franchetti and about 40 other members of her staff transfer to a Royal Australian Navy ship to visit one additional country, Papua New Guinea.

That visit, to be conducted aboard HMAS Tobruk, will further reinforce the "partnership" aspect of Pacific Partnership, Franchetti said. USS Crommelin, a 453-foot guided missile frigate based in Hawaii, will join Pacific Partnership in early September to participate in the final leg of the mission.

Franchetti, a service warfare officer, said it's "a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity" to participate in such a worthwhile humanitarian mission.

"I've been in the Navy for 25 years, and I have never been prouder of a team," she said. "It's very challenging here. The days are long and the mission is very complex. But this has been a great team effort, with some of the hardest-working people, all committed to be being able to work together with our partners and the host nations to be able to provide assistance."

Continuing Promise 2010

In the Western Hemisphere, the amphibious ship USS Iwo Jima arrived in Costa Rica Aug. 20, beginning the third visit during the four-month Continuing Promise 2010 mission that ultimately will take its crew to eight countries in Latin America and the Caribbean.

The ship left its home port in Norfolk, Va., July 12 for a mission that, after Costa Rica, will continue to Guatemala, Guyana, Nicaragua, Panama and Suriname. Each visit will last 10 to 14 days.

Speaking by phone from his stateroom as the Iwo Jima glided into harbor outside Limon, Costa Rica, Negus reflected on the medical and civil assistance help his 1,800-member crew had already delivered in Haiti and Colombia.

For this deployment, Iwo Jima was configured with special medical equipment and manned with medical experts from the U.S. military and 12 partner nations' militaries, the U.S. Public Health Service and more than 20 non-governmental organizations.

They've joined Iwo Jima's 1,000 sailors, a team of Seabees and about 500 members of a Special-Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force that's providing transportation and logistical support for Continuing Promise.

"Partnering is a huge part of this mission," Negus said. "We bring a full range of medical, dental, veterinary and engineering services," all complemented by the rich blend of skill sets and capabilities each participant provides.

In Costa Rica, Negus said, these partners are working at three different medical sites and two engineering and community relations sites, and also providing veterinary services and training with the Costa Rican police force.

"These are remarkably complex operations," he said. "We typically have multiple worksites in each of these areas, and most of those are quite remote. If there's any one challenge, it's just the very complex nature of expeditionary humanitarian assistance in very remote regions across the disparate geography of Latin America and the southern maritime area."

As they carry out their diverse missions, Negus said they're reinforcing core humanitarian assistance competencies that are fundamental to the maritime services -– and invaluable in the event of a real-life disaster.

Those competencies have proven invaluable in the region, both when USS Kearsarge responded to the Haiti's flooding during Continuing Promise 2008, and when USNS Comfort returned there after this year's January earthquake.

Throughout this year's mission, Negus said he's been struck by the reception he and his crew receive as they work hand-in-glove with their host-nation counterparts.

"That is the true magic of this mission –- the interactions, the relationships, the partnerships established through the work we do," he said. "We really are demonstrating our commitment to our neighborhood through our everyday actions."

Unlike most military deployments, which Negus said demonstrate "what we can do," Continuing Promise demonstrates "who we are" as it extends a helping hand to regional neighbors "at the very basic human-to-human level."

As participants conduct their day-to-day missions, Negus said they can't help but be changed from the experience.

"The personal impact you are having in the lives of so many people, it fundamentally changes your outlook ... you can't help our neighbors like we are doing without being affected," he said.

Military Legal Resources

The Federal Research Division (FRD) of the Library of Congress is pleased to announce that the FRD "Military Legal Resources" Web site, sponsored and funded by the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General's Legal Center & School (TJAGLCS) Library, has been updated with six new documents and one new Web subpage.


The 2010 editions of the "Law of War Deskbook," the "Operational Law Handbook," and the "Law of War Documentary Supplement" are now all available: http://www.loc.gov/rr/frd/Military_Law/LCS-International-and-Operational-Law-Dept.html

In addition, there is a new Web subpage for the Administrative & Civil Law Department of TJAGLCS, with links to three documents, including "Survivors Benefits" (revised August 2, 2010):

http://www.loc.gov/rr/frd/Military_Law/Admin-Law-Department.html

General Officer Assignments

The chief of staff, Army announced today the following assignments.

Maj. Gen. Arthur M. Bartell, commanding general, U.S. Army Cadet Command, Fort Monroe, Va., to director, J-3, U.S. Forces-Iraq, Operation Iraqi Freedom, Iraq.

Maj. Gen. David B. Lacquement, deputy director, Signals Intelligence Directorate, National Security Agency, Fort Meade, Md., to director of operations, J-3, U.S. Cyber Command, Fort Meade, Md.

Maj. Gen. James M. McDonald, director, J-3, U.S. Forces-Iraq, Operation Iraqi Freedom, Iraq, to commanding general, U.S. Army Cadet Command, Fort Monroe, Va.

Brig. Gen. Gordon B. Davis Jr., deputy chief of staff for operations and intelligence, G-3/G-2, Allied Rapid Reaction Corps, Germany, to chief, C/J-5, International Security Assistance Force Joint Command, Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan.

Brig. Gen. John A. Davis, deputy commander, Joint Task Force-Global Network Operations, Defense Information Systems Agency, Arlington, Va., to director, current operations, J-33, U.S. Cyber Command, Fort Meade, Md.

Army Reserve Brig. Gen. James H. Doty Jr., to senior commander, Fort Carson, Fort Carson, Colo. Doty most recently served as commander, (Troop Program Unit), 420th Engineer Brigade, Bryan, Texas.

Brig. Gen. John J. McGuiness, assistant deputy for acquisition and systems management, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics and Technology), Washington, D.C., to deputy commander for programs, Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan, Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan.

Brig. Gen. Harry E. Miller Jr., Army National Guard, director, doctrine, training, and force development (J-7), National Guard Bureau, Arlington, Va., to senior commander, Fort Drum, Fort Drum, N.Y.

Brig. Gen. Charles L. Taylor, deputy director, operations and training, Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization, Arlington, Va., to assistant division commander, 2d Infantry Division, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea.

Shark Tank 2010 Participants Earn Weapons Qualifications

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Byron C. Linder, Navy Public Affairs Support Element West

SAN CLEMENTE ISLAND, Calif. (NNS) -- Maritime Expeditionary Security Squadron (MSRON) 1 Reserve Sailors concluded a week of qualifying on small arms and crew-serve weapons systems Aug. 22 at the inaugural field training exercise series Shark Tank 2010 on San Clemente Island, Calif.

Six Reserve detachments from Texas and San Diego have gathered for the training, which focused on the many facets of expeditionary warfare.

Chief Gunner's Mate Jeffrey Meals, Shark Tank 2010's senior range safety officer, explained the process of qualifying more than 260 Sailors on the range of weapons.

"What we're doing is familiarization qualification fire on small arms and crew-serve weapons systems," said Meals. "Those include the M2 .50-caliber, the 9 millimeter pistol, the 556 carbine, the M4 A1 and the M500 shotgun. Sailors have to meet a certain expectation to qualify on the marksman, sharpshooter and expert levels."

Meals emphasized the importance of the training environment in the overall qualification experience.

"Everybody trains in a demanding environment, and this island provides the challenge for Sailors to meet certain goals. They have to think creatively to get the job done," said Meals. "I've talked to all the Sailors out here, and they love it out here. This is where they get to train and practice and put the skills to use. When they do deploy, they'll feel more comfortable in the weapons systems and the procedures."

Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Miguel Monarez, a Shark Tank 2010 student from El Paso, Texas, with Security Detachment Echo, emphasized the importance of every person in an expeditionary warfare environment needing to be familiar and comfortable with operating various weapons systems.

"As a corpsman, we're not supposed to be combatants. But if it comes down to it and you're the last man standing, you should be able to operate all these weapons and save your team," said Monarez.

The weapons qualifications concluded with a night shoot Aug. 22. Sixteen Sailors met the challenge of firing at targets with the 9 millimeter pistol and M4 rifle using only a flashlight and an expanded sight for aid.

Meals explained the importance of varying the conditions and environments to qualify and prepare a Sailor for operating in an expeditionary warfare condition.

"It's not like on a ship where you're confined to a certain environment. These Sailors have to deal with different terrain, weather conditions, lighting conditions, but the response has been outstanding and morale is very high out here," said Meals.

USS Texas Returns from U.S. 4th Fleet Deployment

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ronald Gutridge, Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs

PEARL HARBOR (NNS) -- Virginia-class submarine USS Texas (SSN 775) returned to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Aug. 23 after completing a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility.

This is Texas' first deployment since changing homeports to Pearl Harbor in November 2009. She successfully completed her maiden deployment to the Eastern Pacific and operated under the tactical control of Joint Inter-Agency Task Force, South from May to August 2010. During the deployment, Texas successfully conducted joint operations enhancing national security.

"I am extremely proud of my crew's tenacious can do attitude which resulted in a very successful deployment," said Cmdr. Bob Roncska, Texas commanding officer. "Our ability to rapidly respond to a myriad of tasking over an extended period of time is a testament to the ships' remarkable design and capabilities."

While away from homeport, the crew earned a sea service ribbon, which was the first for 76 Texas Sailors. Additionally, 23 Sailors achieved a significant career milestone by receiving the enlisted submarine warfare qualification also known as "dolphins". Fire Control Technician 2nd Class Kevin Miller from Jacksonville, Fla., became qualified during the deployment.

"Earning my dolphins has been a goal of mine since I joined the Navy," said Miller. "I am extremely proud to be a submariner assigned to USS Texas and would not have it any other way."

Commissioned Sept. 9, 2006, Texas was the second Virginia-class attack submarine constructed and the first submarine to be named after the Lone Star state.

The state-of-the-art submarine is capable of supporting a multitude of missions including anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface ship warfare, strike, naval special warfare involving special operations forces, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance, irregular warfare and mine warfare.

Logistics Agency Supplier Conference Opens in Columbus

By Beth Reece
Defense Logistics Agency Strategic Communications Office

COLUMBUS, Ohio, Aug. 24, 2010 - The doors are open for small businesses wanting to partner with the Defense Logistics Agency, the agency's commander said yesterday at the start of the first-ever DLA Enterprise Supplier Conference and Exhibition taking place through Aug. 25 at the Greater Columbus Convention Center here.

"I'm so pleased that we have so many small businesses here with us because, to large extent, what we want to do in the next few days is demystify the process of doing business with DLA," said Navy Vice Adm. Alan S. Thompson, adding that the conference's agenda includes numerous workshops that will provide attendees with the tools to form successful partnerships with the agency.

With the theme "Globally Responsive Forward Support," the conference also highlights DLA's role as a worldwide logistics provider at a time when defense leaders are seeking more efficient, cost-conscious methods of interacting with private-sector business partners.

More than 1,600 manufacturers and industry representatives are registered at the event. They will be joined by DLA leaders, logistics experts from across the agency's supply chains and acquisition experts. The event features keynote speakers from throughout DoD, in addition to workshops that introduce participants to each supply chain and presentations on collaborative forecasting and procurement integrity. A town hall for service-disabled veteran-owned small businesses is also

scheduled for Aug. 26.

"The major focus of the conference this week is on small business, specifically veteran-owned small business," said Peg Meehan, director of small-business programs for DLA. "We've asked this particular business community to come in and tell us the problems they have in trying to do business with us."

Small-business specialists will be on hand to guide attendees through the various processes the agency uses to acquire goods and services for warfighters.

As the Department of Defense's combat logistics support agency, DLA provides the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, other federal agencies, and joint and allied forces with a variety of logistics, acquisition and technical services. The agency sources and provides nearly 100 percent of the consumable items America's military forces need to operate, from food, fuel and energy, to uniforms, medical supplies, and construction and barrier equipment. DLA also supplies more than 80 percent of the military's spare parts.

Headquartered at Fort Belvoir, Va., DLA has about 26,000 employees worldwide. DLA's business revenues were nearly $38 billion in fiscal year 2009.

MILITARY CONTRACTS August 24, 2010

NAVY

W.W. Gay Fire & Integrated Systems, Inc., Jacksonville, Fla. (N69450-10-D-0046); Wolverine Fire Protection Co., Mt. Morris, Mich. (N69450-10-D-0047); East Coast Fire Protection, Inc., Hanover, Md. (N69450-10-D-0048); and APi National Service Group, St. Paul, Minn. (N69450-10-D-0049), are each being awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple award design-build construction contract for fire protection construction type projects in the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC), Southeast area of responsibility (AOR). The maximum dollar value, including the base period and four option years, for all four contracts combined is $30,000,000. The work to be performed provides for fire protection installation or repairs (new construction and renovations) with some design capabilities. The preponderance of the work will include fire suppression systems (wet, dry, pre-action, wet chemical, deluge and high speed deluge and ultra high speed deluge); water supplies (fire pumps, tanks and underground water mains); low and high expansion foam; gaseous (carbon dioxide and clean agents) special hazard protection; and fire alarm systems (detection, reporting, and mass communication). W.W. Gay Fire & Integrated Systems, Inc., is being awarded task order #0001 at $1,022,656 for construction of the sprinkler, fire alarm, and mass notification system at 2200 complex at Marine Corp Logistics Base Albany, Albany, Ga. Work for this task order is expected to be completed by February 2012. All work on this contract will be performed within the NAVFAC Southeast AOR including, but not limited to: South Carolina (25 percent), Florida (25 percent), Texas (10 percent), Louisiana (10 percent), Mississippi (10 percent), Alabama (10 percent), and Georgia (10 percent). The term of the contract is not to exceed 60 months, with an expected completion date of August 2015. Contract funds for task order #0001 will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website, with 15 proposals received. These four contractors may compete for task orders under the terms and conditions of the awarded contract. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, Jacksonville, Fla., is the contracting activity.

Eagle Industries Unlimited, Inc., Fenton, Mo., is being awarded a maximum $18,496,842 firm-fixed-price contract for enhanced small arms protective inserts plate carrier spares. Work will be performed in Puerto Rico, and is expected to be completed August 2011. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract is being awarded on a sole-source basis. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity (M67854-10-C-3034).

Reyes Construction, Inc.*, Pomona, Calif., is being awarded $6,725,000 for firm-fixed-price task order #0002 under a previously awarded multiple award construction contract (N62473-10-D-5417) for repair of high temperature hot water piping at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms. Work will be performed in Twentynine Palms, Calif., and is expected to be completed by August 2011. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Six proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, Resident Officer in Charge of Construction, Twentynine Palms, Calif., is the contracting activity.

Costa Rica Embraces Continuing Promise 2010 at Opening Ceremony

By Cpl. Alicia R. Giron, Continuing Promise 2010 Public Affairs

LIMON, Costa Rica (NNS) -- Costa Rican officials and service members from USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) participated in an Aug. 21 ceremony in Limon, Costa Rica, which marked the beginning of a ten-day humanitarian civic assistance (HCA) mission in support of Continuing Promise 2010 (CP 10)–Partnership of the Americas.

Ceremony attendees included U.S. Ambassador to Costa Rica Anne Andrew, the Mayor of Limon, Eduardo Barboza, CP 10 mission commander Capt. Thomas Negus, USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Commanding Officer Capt. Thomas Chassee and Joint Medical Group Commander Capt. William Tanner.

The New Harmony Air Force Band of Flight played the Costa Rican and U.S. national anthems before key leaders addressed the local community.

"I cannot tell you how excited we are to visit Costa Rica and work with you all in this humanitarian mission," Negus said. "CP 10 is a commitment to that is as strong as the magnificent ship that brought us here. Our feelings of commitment and partnership are so strong that we use no words - instead we use our actions. Our work is given meaning by our shared neighborhood."

CP 10 mission personnel will spend their time in Limon working at three different medical sites, two engineering and community relations sites, providing veterinary services and training with the Costa Rican Police Force.

As part of the CP 10 mission, U.S. and foreign service members and non-government organizations will provide medical, dental, veterinary and engineering services to host nations within the Caribbean and Central and South America.

"I am delighted that Iwo Jima will be with us for ten days and I know you will extend a warm welcome to them, as you have to me," Andrew said. "I feel very lucky that many of the people I have met within the last week are here with us today to receive the commodore and crew of USS Iwo Jima."

During the opening ceremony, both Andrew and Negus received keys to the city of Limon. Andrew said it was a great honor for the people of Limon to bestow such a gesture to her and the entire Iwo Jima team.

Marines Support Pakistan Flood Relief Efforts

By Elaine Wilson
American Forces Press Service

Aug. 24, 2010 - The Marine Corps has responded to the crisis in Pakistan with troops, aircraft and a host of evacuation support, and relief supplies, the service's commandant said here today.

Marine Corps Gen. James T. Conway recently returned from a trip to Pakistan and updated reporters on the Marines' relief efforts in the wake of massive flooding there in a briefing at the Pentagon.

Since Aug. 12, 2,200 Marines from the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit have responded to the crisis, he said. And, as of this morning, eight Marine CH-46 and four CH-53 helicopters deployed to Pakistan have evacuated 3,075 people and delivered more than 650,000 pounds of cargo.

Meanwhile, the 26th MEU from the East Coast is sailing early to contribute to the disaster relief, Conway said, and the unit should arrive off the Pakistani coast by mid to late September.

The MEUs are the theater reserve for the theater commander, Conway explained. Their deployment strips the commander of some capability to respond elsewhere in the theater, he added, but noted that Marines serving in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province aren't affected.

"We aren't relying upon any of the MEU capacity in Helmand province to be able to continue our functions there," he said.

The floods, however, are having an impact on Pakistan's security. "The Pakistani leadership is consumed with responding to the aftermath of the flood disaster," Conway said. Pakistan Gen. Ashfaq Kayani, chief of army staff, "cautioned me that the involvement of his army in the flood relief will, for a time, detract from their efforts to secure the Pakistani frontier."

To date, the U.S. military has delivered 1.5 million pounds of relief supplies and food, and helicopters have rescued or transported about 6,500 people.

Pentagon Urges Employees to 'Leap' Into Fitness

By Lisa Daniel
American Forces Press Service

Aug. 24, 2010 - The Pentagon has adopted a new civilian employee fitness challenge that officials say is not only good for employees and the Defense Department, but also for the nation.

The Department's civilian personnel policy office is sponsoring the "Leap Into Fall" campaign, which began Aug. 16 and runs through Oct. 31, Kathleen Ott, acting deputy undersecretary of defense for the office, said during an interview yesterday.

"We consider this part of readiness," Ott said. "We want our employees to be fit and be productive. If we pay attention to our employees and their needs, it makes us a better employer, better able to recruit and retain employees, and retain our reputation as a model employer."

The campaign is an extension of an awareness campaign the office began in January that posts health information on its Website, www.cpms.osd.mil/wellness. The site highlights one health issue each month – smoking cessation, nutrition, fitness, mental health, and stress have been covered – with information that can easily be downloaded, Ott said.

"As part of readiness, the department feels strongly that our employees should have at their fingertips the information that helps them live a healthy lifestyle," she said.

But they also wanted to do more than provide information. The office started the "Leap Into Fall" challenge as a call to action to get people moving, Ott said. The challenge supports First Lady Michelle Obama's "Let's Move" campaign for children, she said.

"We needed to put into practice some of theories we were espousing," Ott said. The campaign, she added, allows employees to serve as role models to get their family and friends moving, too.

The campaign goal is for employees to record 1.5 million hours of physical activity over the 10-week period, Ott said.

"You may think that's a lot," she said, "but if everyone in the department spends 30 minutes on physical activity five times a week, we will easily meet that goal." The department, she added, has about 750,000 civilian employees.

Employees may compete as individuals or part of a team. Physical activity doesn't have to be strenuous, Ott pointed out. It could include walking, biking, gardening, or golfing – "anything that gets you up and moving," she said.

Employees can record their activity by logging into The President's Challenge Website at http://presidentschallenge.org, and recording their hours of physical activity. Individuals with 25 hours logged, or teams in which all members log 25 hours, will receive a certificate of achievement. The top three individuals and top three teams will be recognized on the civilian personnel management office's Website, Ott said. More than 5,000 employees have logged onto the site so far, some from as far away as Afghanistan, she said.

"We're excited," she said. "We think this is something our employees are really going to embrace and enjoy.

"It's going to be fun," Ott added, "and it's going to be contagious, especially if you're part of a team. One person will beget another person who will beget another person.

"Embarking on a healthy lifestyle can happen at any stage of a person's life," she said. "It's never too late to start."

Duck Hunt – The Search Resumes

Tuesday, August 24, 2010
Written by: Dan Bender

The plane crashed just east of Koge Bay on the south-eastern coast of Greenland.

Summer in Greenland is coming to a close and conditions are just right to continue the search for missing World War II heroes Lt. John Pritchard and Petty Officer 1st Class Benjamin Bottoms who have been missing since their J2F Grumman Duck airplane crashed during an attempted rescue Nov. 29, 1942.

A team of Coast Guardsmen and contractors leaves for Greenland this Friday to resume the search and the Compass will be covering it all.

The team will be using ground-penetrating radar to locate the anomaly in the ice cap found during last year’s expedition. If this goes successfully the team will melt down into the ice and hopefully confirm the location of the crash.

USS Constitution Chief 'Medical All-Star'

By Seaman Shannon S. Heavin, USS Constitution Public Affairs

BOSTON (NNS) -- A USS Constitution chief petty officer was recognized as a Boston Red Sox "Medical All-Star" during a pre-game ceremony at Red Sox's Fenway Park, Aug. 20.

Chief Hospital Corpsman (SS/SW) Jason Shaeffer was selected by the Red Sox for the medical care he provides to Constitution Sailors while serving as the ship's independent duty corpsman.

"I show up to work every day and work hard," said Shaeffer. "Above all, I believe in doing the right thing in caring for my Sailors."

The Red Sox organization recognizes Medical All-Stars every Friday night during home games throughout baseball season. To be selected, candidates must be an outstanding member of the medical community.

"This city is so embodied with history that giving limelight to USS Constitution Sailors serves as a dual purpose; [Shaeffer's] medical contribution and maintaining the beauty of the oldest ship afloat in the world," said Marty Ray, Red Sox public affairs manager.

Approximately 10,000 spectators who showed up to see the Red Sox play the Toronto Blue Jays also saw Shaeffer's name in lights on the ballpark's mega-screen while he was presented with an exclusive Red Sox jacket. The crowd applauded, and the game began shortly thereafter.

"Chief Shaeffer serves more than 70 Sailors by himself," said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 2nd Class (SW) Jacob Wallace, who submitted Shaeffer's name to the Red Sox organization. "He has to organize all our medical needs and ensure we're within medical standards for our command. It's an important job overseeing the health of so many people, so when I heard about the award, I knew he'd be a perfect candidate for it."

Constitution is located in the Charlestown Navy Yard of Boston Harbor. She is the world's oldest commissioned warship afloat and welcomes more than 500,000 visitors a year.

Former Pro Ball Player Says Air Guard is His Winning Team

By Air Force Master Sgt. Desiree Twombly
Arizona National Guard

Aug. 24, 2010 - When Air Force Staff Sgt. Trevor Harvey lights the candles on the altar before Mass on drill weekends, he favors the hand that once pitched to Ken Griffey Jr. "During one game I pitched, he hit a ball over 500 feet," said Harvey, who now serves as the chaplain's assistant with the Arizona Air National Guard's 162nd Fighter Wing here.

Originally from Imlay City, Mich., Harvey started playing baseball at age 7 and he excelled in the sport. Throughout high school, he played varsity baseball. Just before graduation, word spread quickly to local scouts about the 6-foot-5-inch southpaw.

During games, Harvey noticed scouts in the stands with radar guns.

"Every time I threw a fast ball, the radar guns would come up," he said. "As the games went on and through the end of the season, it wasn't unusual to see more than 30 guys with radar guns in the stands. I knew then something neat was going to happen."

Shortly thereafter he received more than 200 letters from colleges from all over the country asking him to play. Harvey was drafted by the Seattle Mariners right out of high school, but he chose to go to Michigan State University to play with the Spartans.

"One of the stipulations for signing a professional contract was a clause stating that injury would void the contract," he said. "That meant my education would not be paid for. My parents did not think it was a good idea, given that I already had a scholarship waiting in Michigan."

Harvey played for Michigan State from 1990 to 1995. "I got my education paid for and I got an opportunity to travel and play baseball against different schools like Arizona, Texas and Florida," he said. "It was awesome."

His senior year in college proved to be a successful one. He received invitations to try out for the Montreal Expos, Detroit Tigers and the Baltimore Orioles.

A small independent Canadian team called the Brandon Grey Owls ultimately made him an offer he couldn't refuse.

"I was offered a stipend of $700 a month and a place to live. At age 22, that was a big deal," he said.

He played a few games for the Owls, but it wasn't long before a scout from the Colorado Rockies took notice of the left-handed pitcher. They made him an offer, and he was on his way to play for the Rockies.

Shortly after signing his pro contract, Harvey popped his shoulder out of its socket. Recovery was expected to take 18 months.

"The Rockies weren't willing to wait," he said.

His professional baseball endeavor was put on hold, and as a result of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, his motivations changed.

"I had an epiphany after 9/11," Harvey said. "I felt moved by the events and the reactions of the people in my generation. I had to get involved."

In 2003, he enlisted in the Michigan Air National Guard. Three years later, he relocated to Tucson with his family and joined the 162nd Fighter Wing. He considered a chaplaincy with the Army Guard until he was scouted by the chaplain's office here.

"When you play baseball, everyone on the team wears the same uniform and you help each other out," Harvey said. "That is everything that the Air Force is about. It was such an easy transition. I have loved every minute of my time in the Air Force.

"If I had to do it all again," he added, "I would have given up the Michigan State experience and enlisted at age 18. That is how much I love what I do now."