Military News

Wednesday, August 04, 2010

Chairman's Corner: Pride in the Coast Guard

By Navy Adm. Mike Mullen
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

WASHINGTON, Aug. 4, 2010 - Two hundred and twenty years ago today, the United States Congress created the U.S. Revenue-Marine to safeguard our young Nation's shores. We proudly celebrate this as the day the United States Coast Guard was born.

Over the years, generations of men and women have bravely stood the watch in our oldest continuous seagoing service, keeping our homeland safe, protecting our maritime resources and nobly serving as America's Maritime Guardians.

I note with special pride the 2,500 Coast Guardsmen on duty in and around the Gulf of Mexico right now, working hard each day to help clean up the worst oil spill in our nation's history. Having just visited one of our command centers down in New Orleans, I can attest to the professionalism and the sheer determination they are bringing to that critical job.

Their service also extends well beyond our shores. This year alone, Coast Guard men and women responded superbly to the devastating earthquake in Haiti, fought piracy off the coast of Africa, and executed counter-drug operations in the Caribbean, all the while keeping our people, our ports and our waterways safe and secure.

Quite simply, Coast Guardsmen serve wherever America needs them. And Coast Guard families are right there, too, making possible through their own service and sacrifice everything their loved ones do for the nation.

This remarkable story of global service points to a courage and flexibility that makes the Coast Guard's history a very special one. From the humble beginnings of ten schooners designed to protect a small nation from smugglers, the United States Coast Guard now stands as a model around the world. I am very proud to serve with you.

The Joint Chiefs and I salute the incredible men, women, and families of our United States Coast Guard, Reserve and Auxiliary. America is safer because of you.

Happy Birthday ... and Semper Paratus!

DoD officials stress importance of educating teachers about Guard children

By Army Sgt. Darron Salzer
National Guard Bureau

(8/4/10) -- More than 25,000 children of Guard and reserve members have been affected by a deployment since 2001, but their teachers may never have known about their unique situation.

"How do we get to superintendents of schools systems ... and educational leaders … so we are not just fixing a situation in one school, but we're actually fixing a system in terms of training teachers about the challenges that we have been through?” Adm. Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, asked during the 2010 National Guard Volunteer Workshop held here this week.

“This is something we ought to be pretty aggressive with.”

Army Maj. Gen. William Enyart, the adjutant general of Illinois, said before his brigade's last deployment to Afghanistan, he contacted his state superintendent of schools, who also sits on the governor's council.

The state superintendent sent an email to every county superintendent, so "it was relatively simple for us to get that message pushed out," he said.

Mullen said he wants to know that these inputs are working. " What has happened to close on that?" he asked. "I need to know that this stuff is effective.

“There are opportunities to engage ... but then what happened?”

Since 2001, over two million children have been affected by a federal deployment including the 25,000 from the Guard and Reserve, according to the DoD Education Activity.

“That’s a lot of kids across this country in schools and communities that teachers might not even know are being affected by a deployment,” said Kathleen Facon, chief of educational partnerships for DoDEA.

She suggested that National Guard parents ensure that the people closest to their children at school are made aware of any changes at home. “Whether it’s deployment or awareness that a parent is simply serving in the Guard and what that means, then teachers will be able to better understand a child’s behavioral changes.”

Facon said a teacher’s goal is helping the student learn best. “If they know enough about the student, what they are experiencing in their family life, this will help them be a better teacher for that student.

“I’ve never met a teacher that didn’t want to learn, and there is information that we can provide these teachers about signs and symptoms, the deployment cycle and what are things that can be done in the classroom to help the child stay in touch with the deployed parent,” she said.

Facon repeated what Mullen said about not needing new programs, but ensuring the programs that we have work better for families.

“Educators need to be made aware of the support and resources out there for them to better understand these children,” she said. “I think the education community is hungry and eager to support, and help that child be successful academically and socially.”

Facon said educators are not going to think that these programs are something that they don’t need, and that they need to be shown how these programs can be helpful, because they may be applicable for other types of children, such as those dealing with divorce or other type of loss.

“We have a nation interested in helping the military and military families,” she said, “and the education community is no different when it comes to wanting to help.”

Guard Disputes 'Missed Deadline' on Southwest Border

National Guard Bureau

Aug. 4, 2010 - Despite recent media reports, the National Guard has missed no deadlines in the deployment of up to 1,200 Guardsmen to the Southwest border, a Guard official said today.

"Aug. 1 was never intended to be a deadline," said Jack Harrison, director of communications for the National Guard Bureau. "This was intended to be an incremental deployment, which will be conducted over the next 60 to 90 days in support of a request from the Department of Homeland Security, and the National Guard is proceeding according to plan."

The Guardsmen will augment U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Immigration and Customs Enforcement in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California for up to a year performing duties as criminal investigative analysts and entry identification teams, he said.

"This latest support is part of a phased operation that provides a bridge to CBP and ICE so they can recruit, hire, train and then employ up to 1,000 new agents," Harrison said. "The four states are identifying personnel for this new mission, who must be trained and become familiar with some unique equipment and protocols. As they are vetted and trained, they will begin working the missions sets DHS asked the Guard to provide."

These missions are similar to roles that the National Guard filled in Operation Jump Start from 2006 to 2008.

"This new request for support is in addition to the more than 300 Guardsmen, who are currently assigned to our counterdrug mission, which has been ongoing in the region for some 20 years," Harrison said.

History – Crises and an evolving reserve

Wednesday, August 4, 2010
Written by: Dan Bender

The Coast Guard is known for its agility amid the chaos of catastrophe. In many ways, the 8,000 citizen Coast Guardsmen of the reserve have to embody this quality even more than their full-time counterparts. The individuals of the reserve stand ever ready to leave their civilian routines to jump into the fray whenever the nation needs them – a schoolteacher or a businessperson one moment, a hero the next.

Their stock rose further in the last 10 years as their role in the Coast Guard grew with the demands placed on the service. Sept. 11, Hurricane Katrina, and now the Gulf spill have been driving influences for the modernization and evolution of the Coast Guard Reserve into an absolutely essential part of the service’s response package.

“The reserve is a vital component of the service,” said Rear Adm. Sandy Stosz, Director of Reserve and Leadership. ”There appears to be an increased demand for reservists.”

The demanding events of the last decade have shaped the reserve into what it is today but the progression really began in the mid-nineties when it was radically restructured.

“In the old days reservists deployed as a unit,” said Stosz. ”We went from this kind of strategic reserve to an operational reserve where reservists can be deployed as individual augmentees.”

This reset provided the flexibility the reserve would need to take on the huge challenges following the turn of the century beginning with Sept. 11.

During the peak of the mobilization between mid-September and mid-November of 2001, 3,704 reservists, nearly half of the reserve, was on active duty.

“It was doubtful that the U.S. Coast Guard had any reserve left with which to respond if another attack crippled another American port,” said Master Chief Petty Officer Peter Capelotti, Coast Guard historian and Penn State professor, in his book Rogue Wave.

While being stretched thin, reservists also faced hurried call-ups, inefficient draw-downs, and other administrative difficulties, said Capelotti.

Loy directed “adjustments” and “fine-tuning” to the process and the reserve soon returned to some normalcy.

Hurricane Katrina, however, showed the Coast Guard at its finest: agile, focused, and absolutely dedicated. Reservists across the Gulf were activated and performed heroically with the rest of the service, saving tens of thousands of lives.

Where Sept. 11 left the Coast Guard with some uncertainty, Katrina seemed only to show the service’s strengths. These somewhat contrasting periods framed the continuing evolution of the reserve into a major player in the Coast Guard’s ability to function during crisis.

There has been no greater test of this than the Gulf oil spill.

It is already the largest Title 14 reserve activation in the Coast Guard’s history. For months, thousands of reservists have rotated on and off of active duty, from all across the country, to respond to the Gulf. Their endurance through lengthy deployments frees the active components to maintain full mission readiness said Stosz.

“Deepwater Horizon is a tragedy but a unique opportunity,” said Stosz. ”It showcased our strengths and our weakness.”

She added that the reserve’s capabilities will only continue to improve because “the service is becoming a learning organization.”

This willingness to reevaluate and adapt is the exact reason that the reserve is an essential component of Coast Guard mission execution.

QDR Panel Calls for More Force Structure Changes

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

Aug. 4, 2010 - The Defense Department must plan to maintain recent additions to the ground forces for the foreseeable future and boost its long-range strike, maritime and cyber capability to confront global trends and threats, the Quadrennial Defense Review Independent Panel told Congress yesterday.

William Perry and Stephen Hadley, who co-chair the bipartisan panel, told the Senate Armed Services Committee the 2010 QDR needs to go a step further in providing a force-planning construct to shape the Defense Department for the next 10 to 20 years.

They also recommended that Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates establish a new commission on military personnel to reconsider long-standing practices that they called economically unsustainable.

Reporting on the panel's report, issued July 29, Perry -- who served as President Bill Clinton's defense secretary -- said the military likely will need to sustain recent end-strength increases in the Army and Marine Corps for the long term as it focuses on building force structure within the Air Force and Navy.

The Air Force has "about the right force structure," he said, but needs to augment its long-range strike capability. Perry also noted the need to boost the Navy, particularly to sustain free transit in the Western Pacific.

In addition, the Defense Department must be prepared to assist civil departments in the event of a cyber attack, Perry said, recommending that a portion of the National Guard should be dedicated to the homeland security mission.

These requirements come on top of a major recapitalization required of U.S. forces, part of it due to wear and tear on equipment used in Iraq and Afghanistan, he said.

"What we have described as a need will be expensive," Perry conceded. "But deferring recapitalization could entail even greater expenses in the long run."

Perry cited the success of the all-volunteer force, but said dramatic cost increases in recent years to support it can't be sustained long-term.

"We believe we must seriously address those costs, and that failure to do so would lead either to a reduction in force or a reduction in benefits or some way of compromised all-volunteer force -- none of which is desirable," he said.

Perry recommended that Gates establish a commission to evaluate the Tricare military health plan and other benefits, expected service lengths, the "up-or-out" policy and other long-standing personnel practices. Among issues the commission should consider, he said, is emphasizing cash upfront instead of future benefits.

While acknowledging that these "are all big issues and all very politically sensitive," Perry said it's critical that they be addressed to face the future.

Hadley, President George W. Bush's national security advisor, reported the five gravest potential threats likely to arise over the next generation: radical Islamic extremism and the threat of terrorism; the rise of new global powers in Asia; the continued struggle for power in the Persian Gulf and greater Middle East; accelerating global competition for resources; and failed and failing states.

"The current trends are likely to place an increased demand on American hard power to preserve regional balances," he said.

But Hadley also cited a unique opportunity to develop and adapt institutions to confront these challenges. "We have various tools of smart power, diplomacy, engagement, trade, communications about Americans' ideals and intentions," he told the committee. "And these will increasingly be necessary to protect America's interests."

Hadley echoed Gates' call for stronger "soft-power" capabilities, and recommended structural and cultural changes within the government so non-military branches can assume a larger role in protecting national interests.

To promote this effort, Hadley called for Congress to consider establishing a single national security appropriations subcommittee and coordinated authorization process between relevant committees.

He also recommended that the president and Congress establish a national commission to build the civil force for the future and provide a blueprint so civilian departments and agencies are better postured to deploy overseas and work cooperatively with military forces in insecure security environments.

Department of Defense Announces 2010 Maintenance Awards Winners

From the Department of Defense

WASHINGTON (NNS) -- The Department of Defense (DoD) announced Aug. 4 the 2010 winners of the Secretary of Defense Maintenance Awards for depot and field-level units.

These awards are presented annually to recognize outstanding achievements in weapon system and military equipment maintenance.

The 2010 Robert T. Mason Depot Maintenance Excellence Award recipient is the Navy's Emergent Repair Program at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility. The program provided extraordinary support to combat forces by meeting or exceeding operational force requirements in every measurable category. Through innovative solutions, their diverse team was able to repair numerous surface ships and submarines in a very short period of time.

The depot-level award is named in recognition of Robert T. Mason, a former assistant deputy under secretary of defense for maintenance policy, programs and resources. Mason served as the champion of organic depot maintenance for three decades and was instrumental in transforming DoD organic depot-level operations.

A total of six field-level awards are presented in three categories - large, medium and small. The recipients of the 2010 Secretary of Defense Field-level Maintenance Awards in the large category are the Army's Bravo Company, 615th Aviation Support Battalion, Fort Hood, Texas, and the Navy's USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) homeported in Norfolk.

Winners in the medium category are the Navy's Fleet Readiness Center Northwest, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Oak Harbor, Wash., and the Marine Corp's Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 40, Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, N.C.

Small category winners are the Army's Bravo Company, 307th Brigade Support Battalion, Al Asad, Iraq, and the Air Force's 3rd Component Maintenance Squadron, Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska.

The awards will be presented to the winners at the Secretary of Defense Maintenance Awards banquet Nov. 17 during the 2010 DoD Maintenance Symposium and Exhibition at the Tampa convention center in Tampa, Fla.

Additional information regarding the 2010 DoD Maintenance Symposium and Exhibition can be found at www.sae.org/dod

MILTIARY CONTRACTS August 4, 2010

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

Sysco Foodservice Hampton Roads, Suffolk, Va., is being awarded a maximum $250,000,000 prime vendor, indefinite-quantity contract for full-line food service distribution. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Navy. The original proposal was Web-solicited with one response. The date of performance completion is Aug. 4, 2011. The Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., is the contracting activity (SPM300-08-D-3204).

Pierce Manufacturing, Inc., Appleton, Wis., is being awarded a maximum $12,147,165 firm-fixed-price contract for rapid intervention vehicles. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Air Force. There were originally eight proposals solicited with six responses. The date of performance completion is May 27, 2011. The Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., is the contracting activity (GS30F1045D/SPM8E-C-10-FC001).

Altec Industries, Birmingham, Ala., is being awarded a maximum $6,163,000 fixed-price with economic price adjustment contract for telescopic truck cranes. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Army. There were originally seven proposals solicited with four responses. The date of performance completion is May 11, 2011. The Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., is the contracting activity (SPM500-04-D-0090-0107).

NAVY

QinetiQ North America, Inc., Technology Solutions Group, Waltham, Mass., is being awarded a $25,253,501 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for the procurement of Man Transportable Robotic System (MTRS) production systems, depot-level repair parts, spare kits, and approved accessories for the Army. The MTRS is a small robotic vehicle used by explosive ordnance disposal technicians to conduct remote reconnaissance, render safe and/or dispose of explosive devices. Work will be performed in Waltham, Mass., and is expected to be completed by July 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md., is the contracting activity (N00174-10-D-0019).

Accurate Tool & Mfg. Co., Inc.*, Lexington, Ky., is being awarded a $25,000,000 five-year firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for various build-to-print machine shop requirements to support a wide variety of military projects including, but not limited to, the Counter Radio Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare Program. Five additional option years are included and the total maximum contract is $25,000,000. Work will be performed in Lexington, Ky., and is expected to be completed by August 2015. Contract funds in the amount of $11,396 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured with proposals solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities website and 22 offers received. Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity (N00164-10-D-WQ28).

C and S Machine, Inc.*, Plainville, Ind., is being awarded a $25,000,000 five-year firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for various build-to-print machine shop requirements to support a wide variety of military projects including, but not limited to, the Counter Radio Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare Program. Five additional option years are included and the total maximum contract is $25,000,000. Work will be performed in Plainville, Ind., and is expected to be completed by August 2015. Contract funds in the amount of $11,135 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured with proposals solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities website and 22 offers received. Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity (N00164-10-D-WQ36).

J & R Tool, Inc.*, Loogootee, Ind., is being awarded a $25,000,000 five-year firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for various build-to-print machine shop requirements to support a wide variety of military projects including, but not limited to, the Counter Radio Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare Program. Five additional option years are included and the total maximum contract is $25,000,000. Work will be performed in Loogootee, Ind., and is expected to be completed by August 2015. Contract funds in the amount of $10,550 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured with proposals solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities website and 22 offers received. Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity (N00164-10-D-WQ37).

Leatherwood Manufacturing, Inc.*, North Charleston, S.C., is being awarded a $25,000,000 five-year firm-fixed-price indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for various build-to-print machine shop requirements to support a wide variety of military projects including, but not limited to, the Counter Radio Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare Program. Five additional option years are included and the total maximum contract is $25,000,000. Work will be performed in North Charleston, S.C., and is expected to be completed by August 2015. Contract funds in the amount of $11,592 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured with proposals solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities website and 22 offers received. Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity (N00164-10-D-WQ38).

Olympic Fabrication, LLC*, Shelton, Wash., is being awarded a $25,000,000 five-year firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for various build-to-print machine shop requirements to support a wide variety of military projects including, but not limited to, the Counter Radio Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare Program. Five additional option years are included and the total maximum contract is $25,000,000. Work will be performed in Shelton, Wash., and is expected to be completed by August 2015. Contract funds in the amount of $10,771 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured with proposals solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities website and 22 offers received. Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity (N00164-10-D-WQ39).

Specialty CNC, Inc.*, Bloomington, Ind., is being awarded a $25,000,000 five-year firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for various build-to-print machine shop requirements to support a wide variety of military projects including, but not limited to, the Counter Radio Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare Program. Five additional option years are included and the total maximum contract is $25,000,000. Work will be performed in Bloomington, Ind., and is expected to be completed by August 2015. Contract funds in the amount of $13,750 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured with proposals solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities website and 22 offers received. Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity (N00164-10-D-WQ40).

Weeks Marine, Inc., Covington, La., is being awarded a $5,838,059 firm-fixed-price contract for design and construction of maintenance dredging at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek, Fort Story, Little Creek Site. Work will be performed in Virginia Beach, Va., and is expected to be completed by January 2011. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website with four bids received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (N40085-10-C-7213).

Leetex/Hill & Wilkinson, LLC*, Dallas, Texas, is being awarded a $5,520,100 firm-fixed-price contract for construction of a child development center at Meridian Naval Air Station. Work will be performed in Meridian, Miss., and is expected to be completed by February 2012. Funds for this project are provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively negotiated via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website with four proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southeast, Jacksonville, Fla., is the contracting activity (N69450-08-D-1296; Task Order 0002).

AIR FORCE

Advanced Testing Technologies, Inc., Hauppauge, N.Y., was awarded a $9,283,480 contract which will develop test program sets and supplement technical order change pages for the AN/URC-107 Joint Tactical Information Distribution System. At this time, the entire amount has been obligated. 448 SCMG/PKHCA, Robins Air Force Base, Ga., is the contracting activity (FA8539-10-F-0004).

Agate Steel, Inc., Scottsdale, Ariz., was awarded a $5,535,724 contract which will provide 54 prefabricated steel aircraft shelters for T-38 aircraft at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas. At this time, the entire amount has been obligated. 82 CONS/LGCB, Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, is the contracting activity (FA3020-10-C-0003).

Army Swears In New Assistant Secretary for Installations and Environment

The Department of the Army announced today that Katherine Hammack was officially sworn in as the assistant secretary of the Army for installations and environment here today during a ceremony in the Pentagon's Hall of Heroes at 9 a.m. EDT by the Undersecretary of the Army Joseph W. Westphal.

Hammack serves as the primary advisor to the secretary of the Army and chief of staff of the Army on all matters related to installation policy. She has oversight of energy security and management and is responsible for policy and oversight of sustainability and environmental initiatives; resource management including design, military construction, operations and maintenance; Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC); privatization of Army family housing, lodging, real estate, utilities; and the Army's installations safety and occupational health programs.

"I am deeply honored to have the opportunity to influence the quality of life of our soldiers and their families," Hammack said. "Our installations and the environment play such an important role and have such a significant impact on our soldiers, civilians, families and their well-being. Energy security and environmental sustainability are our responsibility to future generations. If our relations with the environment are balanced, so will our relations with our neighbors both at home and abroad."

Prior to her appointment, Hammack was a leader in Ernst & Young LLP's Climate Change and Sustainability Services practice. There she assisted clients with obtaining Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) green building certification for their buildings and identification of sustainability strategies. She was appointed to her new position by President Obama on June 28, 2010.

For more information contact Dave Foster, 703-697-5344 or Dave.Foster1@us.army.mil.

Flag Officer Assignments

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead announced today the following assignments:

Capt. Peter J. Fanta, who has been selected for rear admiral (lower half), will be assigned as deputy director, Surface Warfare for Combat Systems, N86F, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Washington, D.C. Fanta is currently assigned as executive assistant and naval aide to the assistant secretary of the Navy (financial management and comptroller), Washington, D.C.

Rear Adm. Bruce E. Grooms will be assigned as assistant deputy chief of naval operations for operations, plans, and strategy, N3/N5B, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Washington, D.C. Grooms is currently serving as vice director, Joint Staff, Washington, D.C.

Casey Shares Vision of National Guard's Future

By Army Staff Sgt. Jim Greenhill
National Guard Bureau

Aug. 4, 2010 - Returning the National Guard to its Cold War-era strategic reserve posture is not the answer when Defense leaders discuss the future, the Army's chief of staff said here yesterday.

"No one wants to go back to the Guard being just a strategic reserve," Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr. said during a visit to the 2010 National Guard Family Program Volunteer Workshop. "We have come way too far. Half of the Guard are combat veterans. That's a fundamentally different force and, as a result, it's a fundamentally different Army."

The United States is in an era of persistent conflict, Casey said, adding that he anticipates a significant operational tempo for the next decade. That follows nine years of war in which the National Guard has already played a crucial role.

"We are actively working through a study that will answer the question for us: 'What should the role of the Guard and Reserve be in an era where we're likely to have to rely on them continuously for a long period of time?'" he said.

The Army could not have accomplished what it has over last nine years without the National Guard, Casey said. "It's Minutemen and women that are holding this force together," he told the group. "Thank you for what you have done to support this Army and this country."

The general and his wife, Sheila, spent about two hours talking with volunteers who support National Guard families. An event scheduled in the same room was cancelled as the couple lingered for an hour beyond their planned visit to address questions from a standing-room-only audience of Guard family members.

"It's not just the Guard families," Casey said. "It's the entire volunteer force. We realized back in 2007 that we had to significantly increase what we were doing for all Army families, because of what we were asking of them. We were asking of them far more than what our programs were delivering."

Spending on family programs has doubled, and an Army covenant recommitted leadership to supporting active, Guard and reserve families.

"There's always more work to do, but I think it's been very well-received," Casey said.

The Caseys have a noncommissioned officer son on active duty with the Army Reserve, making Sheila Casey both a soldier's wife and a soldier's mother. Meeting with volunteers to whom she can relate not just through empathy but also by first-hand experience, she emphasized self-care.

"Part of the problem that caregivers have is that they don't take care of themselves," she said. "Everybody else comes first. What I end up seeing is people who after extended deployments ... are burned out and they're tired.

"What I ask them to do is to change that and to start putting themselves first, on top of the pile," she added. "If they do that, then they will have the strength and the wherewithal to take care of their families."

Sheila Casey tells military spouses to find one thing that they love to do that is just for themselves and take the time to do that.

Her husband briefed Guard family program volunteers on the Guard's transformed role since Sept. 11, 2001, and Defense Department leaders' goals for a future of more predictable deployments and more time at home between deployments.

Standing in front of a chronological chart displaying the Guard's contributions in the more than 60 years since World War II, the general explained how a decision made from lessons learned from the Vietnam War transformed the Guard.

"The general conventional wisdom coming out of that period ... that we had to rely on the draft and could not rely on the Guard and Reserve broke the active Army," Casey said. "That's too simplistic, ... but ... that led [to] the total force policy, and they said, 'We will never again go to war without the Guard and Reserve.'"

The Guard's role increased in the early 1990s following Operation Desert Storm, and notably shifted in the days after the 9/11 attacks. It has not diminished since.

"From Desert Storm, there has been relatively consistent reliance on the Guard and reserve," Casey said. "Since Sept. 11, we have relied on the Guard and Reserve for a duration and a scope that really has been unprecedented in the last 60 years.

"We are pretty close to being one Army," he continued. "We have purposely integrated the Guard into everything that we do. We have made a huge change with the Guard over the last nine years. ... None of us want to go back to having the Guard as just a strategic reserve."

General Officer Announcements

Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates announced today that the President has made the following nominations:

Army Reserve Brig. Gen. Douglas P. Anson has been nominated for promotion to the rank of major general and assignment as deputy director for J-3, Special Operations Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Fla. Anson is currently serving as director, legislative affairs, (individual mobilization augmentee), U.S. Special Operations Command, Tampa, Fla.

Army Reserve Brig. Gen. Robert G. Catalanotti has been nominated for promotion to the rank of major general and assignment as deputy commanding general (support), (individual mobilization augmentee), Eighth U.S. Army, Korea. Catalanotti is currently serving as program manager, Facilities Security Forces, U.S. Army Central Command, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Army Reserve Brig. Gen. Gregory S. Couch has been nominated for promotion to the rank of major general and assignment as chief of staff, U.S. Transportation Command, Scott Air Force Base, Ill. Couch is currently serving as deputy director of logistics (troop program unit), U.S. Transportation Command, Scott Air Force Base, Ill.

Army Reserve Brig. Gen. David S. Elmo has been nominated for promotion to the rank of major general and assignment as deputy chief for mobilization and reserve affairs, U.S. Army Europe and Seventh Army, Europe. Elmo is currently serving as deputy commander, (individual mobilization augmentee), Southern European Task Force, U.S. Army Africa, Vicenza, Italy.

Army Reserve Brig. Gen. Jeffrey E. Phillips has been nominated for promotion to the rank of major general and assignment as assistant deputy chief of staff, (individual mobilization augmentee), G-1, mobilization and reserve affairs, deputy chief of staff, G-1, Washington, D.C. Phillips is currently serving as senior commander, Fort Stewart, Ga.

Army Reserve Brig. Gen. Robert P. Stall has been nominated for promotion to the rank of major general and assignment as commander, (Troop Program Unit), 108th Training Command (Initial Entry Training), Charlotte, N.C. Stall is currently serving as commanding general, (troop program unit), 98th Training Division (Initial Entry Training), Rochester, N.Y.

Army Reserve Brig. Gen. William D. Waff has been nominated for promotion to the rank of major general and assignment as commander, (Troop Program Unit), 99th Regional Support Command, Fort Dix, N.J. Waff is currently serving as deputy commanding general, (individual mobilization augmentee), U.S. Army Human Resource Command, Alexandria, Va.

Army Reserve Col. Daniel R. Ammerman has been nominated for promotion to the rank of brigadier general and assignment as deputy commanding general, (Troop Program Unit), 99th Regional Support Command, Fort Dix, N.J. Ammerman is currently serving as chief of staff, 353d Civil Affairs Command, Staten Island, N.Y.

Army Reserve Col. Edward G. Burley has been nominated for promotion to the rank of brigadier general and assignment as commander, (Troop Program Unit), 352nd Civil Affairs Command, Fort Meade, Md. Burley is currently serving as commander, (Troop Program Unit), 2d Psychological Operations Group, U.S. Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operation Command (Airborne) Twinsburg, Ohio.

Army Reserve Col. Jody J. Daniels has been nominated for promotion to the rank of brigadier general and assignment as commander, (troop program unit), U.S. Army Reserve Support Command, First Army/deputy commanding general, First Army (East), Fort Meade, Md. Daniels is currently serving as assistant chief of staff, (individual mobilization augmentee), U.S. Africa Command Stuttgart, Germany.

Army Reserve Col. William F. Duffy has been nominated for promotion to the rank of brigadier general and assignment as deputy chief for Public Affairs, (individual mobilization augmentee), Office of the Chief, Public Affairs, Washington, D.C. Duffy is currently serving as strategic intelligence officer, (Troop Program Unit), Army Reserve Element, U.S. Central Command, Tampa, Fla.

Army Reserve Col. Patrick J. Reinert has been nominated for promotion to the rank of brigadier general and assignment as chief judge, (Troop Program Unit), U.S. Army Legal Service Agency, Arlington, Va. Reinert is currently serving as senior military judge, (Troop Program Unit), 150th Judge Advocate General Detachment, (Legal Support Organization), Alexandria, Va.

Army Reserve Col. Douglas R. Satterfield has been nominated for promotion to the rank of brigadier general and assignment as deputy commander (Troop Program Unit), 412th Theater Engineer Command, Vicksburg, Miss./assistant chief of staff (Engineer), Eighth U.S. Army, Korea. Satterfield is currently serving as chief of staff, J-7, U.S. Forces-Iraq, Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Army Reserve Col. John H. Turner III has been nominated for promotion to the rank of brigadier general and assignment as deputy commanding general, 75th Battle Command Training Division, Houston, Texas. Turner is currently serving in the control group, (Individual Ready Reserve), U.S. Human Resource Command, Saint Louis, Mo.

Army Reserve Col. Hugh C. Van Roosen II has been nominated for promotion to the rank of brigadier general and assignment as commander, (Troop Program Unit), 353d Civil Affairs Command, Staten Island, N.Y. Roosen is currently serving as chief of staff, (Active Guard Reserve), U.S. Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operation Command (Airborne), Fort Bragg, N.C.

Army Reserve Col. Ricky L. Waddell has been nominated for promotion to the rank of brigadier general and assignment as assistant chief of staff, (individual mobilization augmentee), J-4, U.S. Forces Korea, Yongsan, Korea. Waddell is currently serving in the control group, (Individual Ready Reserve), U.S. Army Human Resource Command, Saint Louis, Mo.

General Officer Announcements

The Secretary of Defense announced today that the President made the following nominations:

Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., to serve as the assistant commandant of the Marine Corps and for appointment to the rank of general. Dunford is currently serving as the commanding general, I Marine Expeditionary Force; and commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Central Command in Camp Pendleton, Calif.

Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Thomas D. Waldhauser, to serve as the commanding general, I Marine Expeditionary Force/commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Central Command and for re-appointment to the rank of lieutenant general. Waldhauser is currently serving as the deputy commandant for plans, policies, and operations in Washington, D.C.

Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Robert B. Neller to serve as the director for operations, J-3, Joint Staff and for appointment to the rank of lieutenant general. Neller is currently serving as the president, Marine Corps University in Quantico, Va.

Enterprise Departs for Training Assessments


By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert Guerra, USS Enterprise Public Affairs

USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Enterprise (CVN 65), Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 began their tailored ship's training assessment (TSTA)/final evaluation period (FEP) Aug. 3.

The operations are being conducted in conjunction with carrier qualifications for CVW-1 and mark the beginning of the official work-up phase for Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12.

TSTA is a training regiment designed to prepare a ship for prompt and sustained combat operations at sea while also developing and enhancing the ability to self-train and evaluate.

"We begin our work-up cycle today," said Capt. Ryan Scholl, Big E's executive officer. "This is the 'preparing for battle' part of all that we have been working on to date."

While the TSTA/FEP exercise is conducted during a single underway period, there are actually three distinct phases. The first phase focuses on navigation, seamanship, engineering and damage control.

The second phase assesses the capabilities of the flight deck crew and increases scrutiny on combat systems, engineering and the ship's damage control efforts.

The final phase of TSTA requires increased integration of the air wing through complex exercises. Once TSTA is complete, Enterprise will move directly into the FEP portion of the underway period.

FEP is a two-day event which serves as the final exam. It is designed to evaluate CSG-12's ability to fight as a cohesive unit.

Upon completing the work-up cycle, the strike group will be "surge" capable, ready to deploy in support of national tasking.

Afloat Training Group Atlantic is also aboard during the underway period, providing training and evaluating various systems and processes throughout each event.

Enterprise is at sea conducting work-ups leading to its 21st deployment.

Yokosuka Community Participates in National Night Out

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Andrew Ryan Smith, Navy Public Affairs Support Element West, Det. Japan

YOKOSUKA, Japan (NNS) -- Sailors and their families participated in National Night Out at Commander, Fleet Activities Yokosuka (CFAY), Japan, Aug. 3.

National Night Out, celebrating its 27th year, is an event celebrated in all 50 states, U.S. territories, Canadian cities and military bases worldwide.

Dubbed as America's "night out" against crime, the event is designed to heighten crime and drug prevention awareness, generate support for and participation in local anticrime programs and strengthen neighborhood spirit and police-community partnerships.

Yokosuka's 2010 edition featured emergency responders and service members giving others a glimpse of what they do on a daily basis.

"This is a great opportunity for the community to get together and see what activities there are for children, such as scouting," said Lt. Cmdr. Rome Delasalas, who volunteers his time as Boy Scout Troop 35's scout master. "As a case review committee officer for the base, I think events like these are important so kids get a chance to see all the base has to offer. There are lots of sports and activities available to keep kids busy and active so they don't get bored and end up getting themselves in trouble."

The Fleet and Family Support Center, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5, Marine Corps Security Fleet Anti-Terrorism Security Team Pacific and Commander, Naval Forces Japan (CNFJ) Fire Department sent representatives to join patrolmen from the base security team, local Boy Scout and Girl Scout troops and officers of the Yokosuka City Police Department to meet with and answer questions for members of the community.

In an effort to keep things interesting, demonstrations and hands-on interaction were added to enhance static displays. Security personnel from base demonstrated how they perform traffic stops and gave a military working dog demonstration. EODMU 5 gave attendees an opportunity to test drive their bomb disposal robot.

U.S. Navy Ships Arrive at Seattle for Seafair 2010

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nardel Gervacio and Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Charles Whetstine, Navy Public Affairs Support Element West Det. Northwest

SEATTLE (NNS) -- USS Port Royal (CG 73), USS Kidd (DDG 100) and USS Green Bay (LPD 20) arrived in the Port of Seattle Aug. 3 for Seattle Seafair 2010.

Seattle Seafair is an annual summer celebration. The U.S. Navy, along with the Canadian navy and U.S. Coast Guard, participate in the event, during which selected ships sail into Seattle.

"Seafair is a great opportunity for Sailors to visit the great city of Seattle and interact with the public in a positive way," said Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Mechincal) 2nd Class (SW) Brian Macias assigned to the Kidd. "I'm really looking forward to some of the great events in Seattle that are open to Sailors, like the Mariners Military Appreciation Night."

There are various activities held throughout the week for the Sailors to participate in, but some plan to take advantage of being in the Seattle area and visiting with family and friends.

"I'm excited to see some of my friends from the area that I haven't seen in years," said Boatswain's Mate 2nd Class Richard Hinkson. "I'm also looking forward to the boat races and air show at Lake Washington."

For some, the arrival meant preparing for the next evolution, which would be the "Parade of Ships." This event involves the ships taking on groups and giving them tours while the ships pull out and cruise the Elliot Bay area.

The community is also invited aboard the ships from Aug. 2 - 5 at the downtown Seattle Waterfront.

Sailors said they were pleased to have the opportunity to visit Seattle and will get a chance to not only show the colors of the U.S. Navy, but to enjoy themselves while in port.

"It's a beautiful city and my first time here. It was kind of a long transit, but I'm ready to go out and eat some seafood," Electronics Technician 3rd Class (SW) John Polinard.

"I'm excited. I'm looking forward to getting out on liberty and seeing what Seattle has to offer. I might go find out what the Space Needle's all about," said Boatswain's Mate 1st (SW) Class John Cook.

Lavelle Posthumously Nominated to General

The Department of Defense announced today that retired Air Force Maj. Gen. John D. Lavelle has been nominated posthumously by the President for advancement on the retired rolls to the rank of general. This follows an Air Force Board for Correction of Military Records decision and recommendations from the secretary of defense and secretary of the Air Force.

In April 1972, Lavelle was removed from command as a result of allegations that he ordered unauthorized bombing missions into North Vietnam, and that he authorized the falsification of reports to conceal the missions. Lavelle was retired in the grade of major general, two grades lower than the last grade he served on active duty. Lavelle died in 1979.

In 2007, newly released and declassified information resulted in evidence that Lavelle was authorized by President Richard Nixon to conduct the bombing missions. Further, the Air Force Board for Correction of Military Records found no evidence Lavelle caused, either directly or indirectly, the falsification of records, or that he was even aware of their existence. Once he learned of the reports, Lavelle took action to ensure the practice was discontinued.

In light of the new information, a request was made to the Air Force Board for Correction of Military Records for reinstatement to the grade of general, Lavelle's last grade while on active duty.

The evidence presented clearly corrected the historical record and warranted a reassessment of Lavelle's retired grade.

For more information, media should call Air Force Public Affairs, at 703-695-0640