Military News

Monday, March 01, 2010

MILITARY CONTRACTS March 1, 2010

ARMY

Weeks Marine, Inc., Covington, La., was awarded on Feb. 25, 2010, a $58,509,050 firm-fixed-price contract for work consisting of mechanical and hydraulic construction of containment levees requiring deep excavation to minus-70 feet, shoreline protection, and spillbox rehab to increase the capacity of Placement Areas 14 and 15; and maintenance and new work dredging of the Houston Galveston Navigation Channel Bayport to Morgans Point with four options. Work is to be performed at Harris County, Texas, and Chambers County, Texas, with an estimated completion date of March 31, 2012. Thirty-four bids were solicited with four bids received. U.S. Army Engineer District Galveston, Texas, is the contracting activity (W912HY-10-C-0016).

Watterson Construction Co., Anchorage, Alaska, was awarded on Feb. 25, 2010, a $26,451,500 firm-fixed-price contract for a Warrior Transition Complex that is a design-build construction project. Work is to be performed at Fort Richardson, Alaska (91.2 percent), and Anchorage, Alaska (8.8 percent), with an estimated completion date of Dec. 26, 2011. Bids were solicited on the Web with 10 bids received. U.S. Army Engineer District, Alaska, Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska, is the contracting activity (W911KB-10-C-0011).

Davis Constructors & Engineers, Inc., Anchorage, Alaska, was awarded on Feb. 25, 2010, a $19,839,494 firm-fixed-price contract for design and construction of the Air Force aero-medical services/mental clinic. Work is to be performed at Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska, with an estimated completion date of Feb. 26, 2012. Bids were solicited on the Federal Business Opportunities Web site with nine bids received. U.S. Army Engineer District, Alaska, Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska, is the contracting activity (W911KB-10-C-0012).

Hensel Phelps Construction Co., Orlando, Fla., was awarded on Feb. 25, 2010 a $14,869,000 firm-fixed price contract, Task Order Number #0001, for construction of Battalion Dining Facilities. The project consists of a standard design two battalion 1,300 person, stand-alone dining facilities for a Training Battalion Complex. Install intrusion detection system (IDS) and connect energy monitoring and control system (EMCS). Supporting facilities include electrical, water, sewer, and natural gas services; security lighting; exterior communications; fire protection; storm sewer system and detention structure; paving, striping, curb and gutter, and sidewalks; site preparation, erosion control/grassing, landscaping; and signage. Work is to be performed at Fort Benning, Ga., with an estimated completion date May 20, 2011. Four bids were solicited and four bids received. U.S. Army Engineer District, Savannah, Ga., is the contracting activity (W912HN-07-D-0050).

Hensel Phelps Construction, Co., Orlando, Fla., was awarded on Feb. 25, 2010, a $14,850,000 firm-fixed-price contract, task order #0002, for construction of battalion dining facilities. The project consists of standard-design, two-battalion, 1,300 person stand-alone dining facilities for a training battalion complex with the installation of an intrusion detection system and a connect energy monitoring and control system. Supporting facilities include electrical, water, sewer and natural gas services; security lighting; exterior communications; fire protection; storm sewer system and detention structure; paving, striping, curb and gutter, and sidewalks; site preparation, erosion control/grassing, landscaping; and signage. Work is to be performed at Fort Benning, Ga., with an estimated completion date of May 20, 2011. Four bids were solicited and four bids received. U.S. Army Engineer District, Savannah, Ga., is the contracting activity (W912HN-07-D-0050).

NAVY

Koam Engineering Systems, Inc., San Diego, Calif., is being awarded a potential $51,146,913 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for tactical data link (TDL) systems support of a range of Navy, Marine Corps, Army, Air Force and Foreign Military Sales Programs including airborne tactical data systems; ballistic missile defense; command and control processor; common link integration processing; dynamic net management; joint tactical radio system; tactical systems (engineering, integration, test, evaluation, fleet) support; and associated subsystems, network, process, and capability maturity model integration support. Support efforts include the maintenance and modification of the TDL computer programs; life cycle functions of systems; research and requirements analysis; systems engineering; software design and engineering; configuration management; modeling and simulation; and human factors engineering. This contract is one of three contracts awarded; all awardees will compete for task orders during the ordering period. All work will be performed at government and contractor sites in the San Diego area, and is expected to be completed Feb. 28, 2015. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via publication on the Federal Business Opportunities Web site and posting to the Space and Naval Warfare Systems e-Commerce Central Web site, with three viable offers received. The Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity (N66001-10-D-0027).

Odyssey Systems Consulting Group, Wakefield, Mass., is being awarded a $47,788,003 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for tactical data link (TDL) systems support of a range of Navy, Marine Corps, Army, Air Force and Foreign Military Sales Programs including airborne tactical data systems; ballistic missile defense; command and control processor; common link integration processing; dynamic net management; joint tactical radio system; tactical systems (engineering, integration, test, evaluation, fleet) support; and associated subsystems, network, process, and capability maturity model integration support. Support efforts include the maintenance and modification of the TDL computer programs; life cycle functions of systems; research and requirements analysis; systems engineering; software design and engineering; configuration management; modeling and simulation; and human factors engineering. This contract is one of three contracts awarded; all awardees will compete for task orders during the ordering period. All work will be performed at government and contractor sites in the San Diego area, and is expected to be completed Feb. 28, 2015. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via publication on the Federal Business Opportunities Web site and posting to the Space and Naval Warfare Systems e-Commerce Central Web site, with three viable offers received. The Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity (N66001-10-D-0028).

Computer Sciences Corp., San Diego, Calif., is being awarded a potential $46,911,088 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for tactical data link (TDL) systems support of a range of Navy, Marine Corps, Army, Air Force and Foreign Military Sales Programs including airborne tactical data systems; ballistic missile defense; command and control processor; common link integration processing; dynamic net management; joint tactical radio system; tactical systems (engineering, integration, test, evaluation, fleet) support; and associated subsystems, network, process, and capability maturity model integration support. Support efforts include the maintenance and modification of the TDL computer programs; life cycle functions of systems; research and requirements analysis; systems engineering; software design and engineering; configuration management; modeling and simulation; and human factors engineering. This contract is one of three contracts awarded; all awardees will compete for task orders during the ordering period. All work will be performed at government and contractor sites in the San Diego area, and is expected to be completed Feb. 28, 2015. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via publication on the Federal Business Opportunities Web site and posting to the Space and Naval Warfare Systems e-Commerce Central Web site, with three viable offers received. The Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity (N66001-10-D-0026).

Insight Technology, Inc., Londonderry, N.H., is being awarded a $34,080,706 firm-fixed-price contract for the Fusion Goggle System Version 4 (FGS V4). U.S. Special Operations Command requires the FGS V4 for special operations force elements currently engaged in the overseas contingency operations. The application for this item is combined thermal imaging and image intensification which provides increased situational awareness. Work will be performed in Londonderry, N.H., and is expected to be completed by March 2015. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity (N00164-10-D-JQ58).

Lockheed Martin Maritime Systems and Sensors, Syracuse, N.Y., is being awarded a $14,700,000 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-09-C-6238) for the production of five TB-29A thin line towed arrays (TLTA). The TB-29A TLTA is a passive underwater acoustic sensor utilizing a thin line towed body. Work will be performed in Syracuse, N.Y. (62 percent); Salt Lake City, Utah (15 percent); Millersville, Md. (15 percent); Mauldin, S.C. (4 percent); and Cambridge, Mass. (4 percent). Work is expected to be completed by March 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., Fort Worth, Texas, is being awarded a $12,303,065 firm-fixed-price, cost-plus fixed-fee delivery order against a previously issued basic ordering agreement (N00019-06-G-0001) to provide systems engineering and program management services in support of the H-1 upgrade production program. Work will be performed in Hurst, Texas (70 percent), Amarillo, Texas (15 percent), and New Bern, N.C. (6 percent). Work is expected to be completed in December 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

SmithGroup, Inc., Phoenix, Ariz., is being awarded a $6,046,433 modification to increase the maximum dollar value under a firm-fixed-price architect-engineer contract (N62742-10-C-0001) for design and engineering services for the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command at Hickam Air Force Base. The work to be performed provides for design and engineering services, environmental field investigation, soil investigation, and topographic survey to develop design-bid-build documents for construction of a multi-story facility which includes a central identification laboratory, administrative office spaces, and a warehouse. After award of this modification, the total cumulative contract value will be $7,120,509. Work will be performed in Oahu, Hawaii, and is expected to be completed by December 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Pacific, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is the contracting activity.

The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Mo., is being awarded a $5,820,084 firm-fixed-fee delivery order against a previously issued basic ordering agreement (N00019-05-G-0026) to provide integrated logistics services in support of Harpoon and SLAM-ER programs for the Navy and for the governments of Korea, the United Kingdom, Taiwan, Egypt, Japan, Turkey, Pakistan, Australia, Saudi Arabia, Greece, Israel, Singapore, Canada, Thailand, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Kuwait, Chile, Malaysia, Oman, and Bahrain.. Work will be performed in St. Charles, Mo., and is expected to be completed in November 2010. Contract funds in the amount of $2,083,931 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This order combines purchases for the U.S. Navy ($2,083,931; 35.8 percent) and the governments of Korea ($694,901; 11.9 percent); United Kingdom ($283,542; 4.9 percent); Taiwan ($279,606; 4.8 percent); Egypt ($262,530; 4.5 percent); Japan ($245,231; 4.2 percent); Turkey ($234,045; 4.0 percent); Pakistan ($200,610; 3.5 percent); Australia ($195,660; 3.4 percent); Saudi Arabia ($190,438; 3.3 percent); Greece ($174,978; 3.0 percent); Israel ($166,927; 2.9 percent); Singapore ($163,710; 2.8 percent); Canada ($136,710; 2.3 percent); Thailand ($116,168; 2 percent); UAE ($88,178; 1.5 percent); Kuwait; $64,890; 1.1 percent); Chile ($62,415; 1.1 percent); Malaysia ($60,683; 1.0 percent); Oman ($59,445; 1.0 percent); and Bahrain ($55,486; 1.0 percent) under the Foreign Military Sales program. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

U.S. TRANSPORTATION COMMAND

Crowley Liner Services, Inc., Jacksonville, Fla., has been awarded a sole-source letter contract to obtain emergency port related services in Haiti. The contract has a not-to-exceed amount of $22,000,000. The contract is for services required to restore cargo delivery capability and support Haiti port operations at Port-au-Prince. Services include surveying damaged ports and beaches; establishment of beach landing operations; cargo lightering operations to establish a link between deep draft cargo vessels and beach landing facilities; warehousing; cargo consolidation; trucking; placement of docking barges with cranes to function as temporary piers and removal of various obstructions in the water, to include a large gantry crane. Work will be performed in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and the performance period is from Jan. 16, 2010, to April 15, 2010. This was a sole-source procurement executed under the authority of FAR Part 6.302-2, Unusual and Compelling Urgency. The U.S. Transportation Command, Directorate of Acquisition, Scott Air Force Base, Ill., is the contracting activity (HTC711-10-C-W001).

Analysis Program Focuses on Preventing Combat Injuries

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

March 1, 2010 - Every time a servicemember is killed or wounded in combat, it sets off a sweeping process aimed at identifying what happened, who perpetrated it and how it might have been prevented -- and instituting changes to reduce the likelihood of it being repeated. The Joint Trauma Analysis and Prevention of Injury in Combat Program brings together experts within the Defense Department's medical, operational, intelligence and material development communities, who analyze each casualty to glean life-saving lessons, explained Army Lt. Col. Mark Dick, the program manager.

They study autopsy information, pore through after-action reports and medical files, assess vehicle damage reports and ballistic studies and conduct computer models and simulations to replicate and confirm operational events.

The goal, Dick said, is to identify vulnerabilities and give decision-makers the concrete findings they need to help shore them up.

The JTAPIC program stood up in 2007 to tap into the full spectrum of expertise across the department to mitigate combat risk. The Army serves as the executive agent, with the program office based at the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command at Fort Detrick, Md.

Although leaders may have a hunch about what caused a catastrophic incident, Dick said the JTAPIC analyses provide a scientific assessment that addresses the myriad factors involved.

"If you make a decision based on just one subset of the data, you don't always come to the appropriate conclusion," he said. "We take everything from medical data to threat data to [data about the] operational environment, and we integrate those into analysis products."

JTAPIC analyses have revealed everything from the need to change tactics, techniques and procedures, to modify weapons systems and how they're used, to provide better force protection and medical care for wounded troops, he said.

They've sparked changes in the way the military operates, the equipment it purchases and the protections it provides its troops.

Some findings get passed directly to commanders on the ground, who in some cases can introduce immediate changes to reduce their troops' vulnerability to enemy threats, Dick said.

In other cases, the analyses lead to longer-term changes that impact the broader military community. They can result in doctrinal changes that guide military operations or the warfighter training programs.

They also can impact weapons systems -- how they're designed, what capabilities they have and what force protections they include. Rather than making specific recommendations to program managers, Dick's team provides analyses to help program managers in their acquisition decisions.

Dick acknowledges that the true impact of the program is hard to quantify, because it's largely measured in injuries prevented and lives saved rather than lost.

"We don't always see the success stories, where there was an incident and soldiers, because of the protective systems that have been incorporated, have walked away," he said. "In some cases, they may have been treated at the platoon level, or immediately gone back to the fight, and we never hear about it."

But Dick has little doubt that the JTAPIC program is making a difference for troops on the front lines -- and will continue to benefit tomorrow's servicemembers as well.

"Let me suffice it to say that what we're doing is limiting the number of lost lives, and it's also limiting the severity of injuries," he said. "This effort has increased soldier survivability, and the safety of our combat systems."

Dick praised the commitment of JTAPIC partners, who, by leveraging existing programs and infrastructure, have provided a critical new capability. "It's been a success story in itself," he said.

Former Soldier Drives U.S. to Bobsled Gold


By Tim Hipps
Special to American Forces Press Service

March 1, 2010 - Former U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program bobsledder Steven Holcomb ended Team USA's 62-year gold medal drought in Olympic bobsled competition by driving Justin Olsen, Steve Mesler and Curtis Tomasevicz to victory in the four-man event Feb. 27 at Whistler Sliding Centre here. Holcomb, 29, of Park City, Utah, piloted "The Night Train" sled designed by former NASCAR driver Geoff Bodine down the fastest bobsled track in the world to a four-heat combined time of 3 minutes, 24.46 seconds. They lowered the track record in each of their first two runs Feb. 26, leaving it at 50.86 seconds.

"It's incredible," Holcomb said. "We've been working so hard the last four years, and it's finally paid off. It's kind of overwhelming. It's been stressful, but awesome, kind of all over the place."

Five-time Olympic medalists Andre Lange and Kevin Kuske teamed with Alexander Roediger and Martin Putze aboard Germany 1 to win the silver medal with a time of 3:24.84. The Canada 1 quartet of Lyndon Rush, Chris Le Bihan, David Bissett and Lascelles Brown claimed the bronze in 3:24.85, marking the first time in 46 years Canadian bobsledders have medaled at the Olympics.

Team USA's .38 margin of victory is considered a landslide in the sport.

"We came out here to show we're the best team in the world," Holcomb said. "It was a full team effort. We have fun together, and that's why we come out and dominate."

Team USA 1 blasted out of the blocks with start times of 4.75, 4.73, 4.77 and 4.76 for runs of 50.89, 50.86, 51.19 and 51.52 seconds.

"We had four great starts and four great runs," Holcomb said. "We started the weekend with the start record, which was huge. We wanted to make a statement and make sure they knew we were here to play."

Warmer temperatures slowed the track by nearly a second for Feb. 27's final two heats. Heavy snowfall during the first two heats the day before contributed to six crashes, including USA 2, driven by WCAP bobsled pilot Sgt. John Napier with WCAP brakeman 1st Lt. Chris Fogt, Chuck Berkeley and Steve Langton aboard.

Team USA physicians convinced Napier to bypass the final two heats because of limited neck mobility from the crash.

"This really hurts," Napier said as he watched Holcomb's third run on television monitors at the finish line. "Yesterday was my last race of the season."

U.S. bobsled head coach Brian Shimer, a five-time Olympian, was not overly concerned.

"I told John that he did an awesome job and that this is just the beginning," said Shimer, a 2002 Olympic bronze medalist. "He has a bright future ahead of him, and I'm proud to be his coach. Their team had a big start yesterday and they were flying down the course, so this is really hard for them to take. But we look forward to a great future for John in this sport.

"He may be the one to break my record of five Olympics," Shimer continued, "and I hope I'm able to share his success with him in the upcoming years."

Army National Guard Outstanding Athlete Program Sgt. Mike Kohn drove to 13th place with Jamie Moriarty, Bill Schuffenhauer and Nick Cunningham aboard USA 3 in 3:27.32.

"I'm thankful they kept fighting, because I kept fighting," said Kohn, 37, of Chantilly, Va., who plans to retire from the sled and deploy soon to Afghanistan with his National Guard unit. "We're just thankful we got down safely.

"It's been more than a difficult race; it's been a difficult season for us," he added. "The moral of the story is, 'Keep fighting, because you never know what's going to happen.'"

(Tim Hipps works in the U.S. Army Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Command public affairs office.)

General Officer Announcement

March 1, 2010 - Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates announced today that the President has made the following nomination:

Army Maj. Gen. John W. Morgan III has been nominated for appointment to the rank of lieutenant general and assignment as commander, Force Command, Heidelberg. Morgan is currently serving as the chief of staff, U.S. European Command, Germany.

Soldiers Provide Communications Support in Haiti


By Navy Lt. Arlo Abrahamson
Special to American Forces Press Service

March 1, 2010 - Soldiers assigned to the communications directorate for the Joint Forces Special Operations Component Command have played a critical role in supporting civil affairs and other humanitarian operations conducted by U.S. special operations forces here during Operation Unified Response. Special operations forces served as the commander's eyes on the ground during the early days of the rescue and recovery phases of relief operations in the wake of a magnitude 7.0 earthquake that struck Jan. 12. These tasks rely heavily on vital links between forward elements and operational commanders, a support capability that Signal Corps soldiers bring to an operation.

"There's a lot of coordination and streamlining that goes into our job, because we have to work across a variety of networks and satellite feeds," said Army Staff Sgt. Kelly Williams, a communications team leader. "We have to ensure the end user, our people in the field, have the signal capabilities they need to accomplish their assigned tasks."

To remain mission capable, Williams said, computer networks must continue to run efficiently, and tactical, radio and satellite communications equipment must be managed and maintained.

"There's a lot of security protocols and other procedures we must follow to run efficient networks," Williams said, "but we try to make that as transparent as possible for our users."

But as Army Staff Sgt. Wayne Potts explained, there's also a hands-on portion of their mission.

"The civil affairs teams bring communications equipment with them to the field, but we show them how to get the most out of this equipment," Potts said. "We want to make sure they have the right capabilities when they get to where they are going so they can concentrate on the overall mission we have here in Haiti."

That mission, humanitarian operations, is one these soldiers know they have enhanced with the skills they bring to the operation.

"We feel good knowing we played a part in the overall success of our mission," said Army Sgt. Derek Auguste. "Communications are vital to any operation – everyone has to talk and coordinate with each other. We feel like we created an environment where that could be successful."

(Navy Lt. Arlo Abrahamson serves in the Joint Forces Special Operations Component Command public affairs office.)

Pentagon Official Notes Navy Center's Diversity


By Troy Clarke
Special to American Forces Press Service

March 1, 2010 - As part of his initiative to "take the Pentagon to the people," the Defense Department's top diversity management and equal opportunity official visited the Navy's command responsible for independent assessment Feb. 25. Clarence A. Johnson, principal director of the Pentagon's diversity management and equal opportunity office, met with Naval Surface Warfare Center Corona's senior leadership, diversity council, African-American special emphasis program group, and addressed an overflow audience of employees.

"Diversity means collecting all the strengths, all the attributes to help execute our mission," said Johnson, a retired Air Force colonel and head of the Pentagon's diversity and equal opportunity office for the last seven years. "Diversity is a key component to mission readiness, because it gives each individual an opportunity to put his or her strengths forward to support the mission."

Johnson said the Navy is leading the armed services in diversity, and its top leaders are making a considerable effort to ensure the maritime service reflects the diversity of America.

"Right now, the Navy has the best overall diversity programs of all the services," Johnson said, giving Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead and his predecessor, Adm. Mike Mullen -- now chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff – much of the credit.

"What Admiral Roughead is doing, and what Admiral Mullen did before him, is a huge commitment to diversity," Johnson said. "The other services are trying to emulate what the Navy's doing."

Corona is one of Naval Sea Systems Command's most diverse warfare centers, and its sustained outreach strategy to attract diverse talent to the Navy has paved the way for the naval command to build connections with educators, business leaders, government officials and affinity groups geared toward science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

Johnson said he is highly impressed with the warfare center's work force and diversity outreach programs and thinks other services can learn from its example.

"From what I've seen here, Corona is a model for everyone to follow," he said. "I see a program where senior leadership is engaged in personnel management from cradle to grave. He noted connections to the National Society of Black Engineers, the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Awards Conference, the League of United Latin American Citizens and other organizations that focus on advocating for women and minorities.

Corona commanding officer Navy Capt. Jay Kadowaki said that outreach to under-represented minorities is vital for the Navy's future, especially as the Navy adapts to demographic shifts of tomorrow's talent.

"Without question, diversity makes our Navy stronger," he said. "And the different experiences, backgrounds and talents of our sailors and civilians helps us be an unbeatable team. It allows the development and execution of new ideas to ensure the Navy advances with the nation's demographic changes and technological challenges."

Each year, the Navy's outreach efforts reach a variety of diverse populations, including Historically Black Colleges and Universities and their 235,000 annual graduates; the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, with a base of 20,000 members; the National Association of Asian American Professionals, which reaches 2,500 technical professionals and the Society of Women Engineers, which reaches about 40,000 female engineers.

Johnson said diversity is critical to get the best talent in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields – and that's not just an employee recruitment issue. For the Pentagon, he said, it's a matter of national security.

As part of its human capital strategy, Corona has had a long-term commitment to science, technology, engineering and mathematics education outreach, and in October received the first STEP Award for Government Leadership in Science and Technology Education from the Science and Technology Education Partnership, a Southern California nonprofit organization. Through its outreach efforts in the last decade alone, Corona has reached some 40,000 students from kindergarten through high school in the culturally and ethnically diverse states of California and Hawaii.

And for the Pentagon's top diversity management official, outreach with a diversity approach is a winning combination.

"Our charge is to capture intellectual strength to get the best solution for our armed forces and for our nation," Johnson said. "You really need to be looking at the diverse attributes coming to the table to get the mission done."

Corona's technical director and senior executive Bill Luebke said his science and engineering command also is uniquely poised to help his command and Naval Sea Systems Command get the best and the brightest talent to execute the Navy's mission.

"Corona is located at the center of Southern California's dynamic and diverse talent pool," Luebke said. "We are also at the epicenter of more than a dozen world-class colleges and universities that produce high-caliber science and engineering graduates."

Johnson said he got more here than what he came for.

"I'm going to use this visit as a benchmark to talk to other leaders about diversity," he said. "They need to call Corona to see what they're doing out there. This is, indeed a model installation."

Naval Surface Warfare Center Corona serves as the Navy's independent assessment agent and is responsible for gauging the warfighting capability of weapons and integrated combat systems through assessment of system performance, readiness, quality, supportability and the adequacy of training. The base is home to three national laboratories and assessment centers: the Joint Warfare Assessment Lab, the Measurement Science and Technology Lab, and the Daugherty Memorial Assessment Center.

(Troy Clarke works in the Naval Surface Warfare Center Corona public affairs office.)

Diversity in the Department of Defense

By Christen N. McCluney

March 1, 2010 - The Pentagon Channel recently interviewed Clarence Johnson, Principal Director, Diversity Management and Equal Opportunity, about celebrating African American History Month and Diversity in the Department of Defense.

Johnson highlighted that throughout the month there have been many events to commemorate and educate the DOD on the culture and legacy of African-Americans, including lunches, fashion shows and career fairs.

“The reason we celebrate African-American history month is to show that blacks have played a part in establishing a successful America,” Johnson said.

African-Americans have played a role in the Department of Defense, in both the military and civilian side since its existence as far back as the revolutionary war.

When Carter G. Woodson came up with the idea of Negro history week he wanted to highlight groups like the Tuskegee Airmen, Buffalo Soldiers and Montford Point Marines, he added. These groups served in two fronts, in a war environment and at home in a segregated environment.

“Over the course of time the DOD has given many blacks the opportunity to serve, train and be educated,” Johnson said. “The G.I. bill had a lot to do with the growth of the middle class and many blacks profited from it.”

Johnson also said that DOD leadership stresses that “diversity is the source of our strength” and being able to celebrate diversity whether it be African-American History Month, Native American History Month or Women’s History Month is testimony to the departments commitment to the statement.

“The military has come a long way in assimilating races, women and persons with disabilities into our workforce,” he said. The number of African-Americans in the military has increased over the last 10 years to about 18% and Hispanic officership has also increased as well.

Johnson also said that there are three major enduring diversity challenges that the military faces: incorporation of people with targeted disabilities in the workforce, the representation of Hispanics through the civilian workforce in the DOD and representation of all minorities in the senior grade the department.

The military tends to reflect the population Johnson added. It’s important to continue to celebrate diversity and continue to show its importance.

“Research shows that diverse groups perform better,” he said. “The military is full of diverse groups, diverse thoughts and diverse talents. I think our military and our nation are stronger for it.”

Philippine Armed Forces Spread Good Will


By Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael J. Carden
American Forces Press Service

March 1, 2010 - A medical outreach event here Feb. 25 showed the resolve not only of the Philippine armed forces, but also of the international community, to spread good will to the southern Philippines. Philippine Marine Battalion Landing Team 1 coordinated the efforts with the local government, Philippine military doctors, U.S. forces and even a nonprofit charity from the United States.

Volunteers provided supplies and services and were able to offer dental care, some minor surgeries, medicines and consultations. U.S. forces also donated several wheelchairs to those in need.

"[Philippine forces] recognize the need people have for these services and are very proactive in planning these types of events," said Army Capt. Bill Adams, a civil affairs officer with Joint Special Operations Task Force Philippines here. "They do a tremendous job, and their efforts have been very good."

Hundreds turned out to take advantage of a variety of free medical care organized by the armed forces of the Philippines. Women, children and the elderly gathered patiently outside of the bamboo-and-straw medical stations. They waited happily for care, because this was the first chance in some time for many of them to see a doctor.

As is the case in much of the region, events such as these give residents opportunities they may not otherwise have to seek treatment, several Philippine troops at the event said.

Adams, who's been deployed here since November, said these types of outreach events are a great way for the troops to show they care as well as relate to the people.

"These troops put themselves out there, even in places where they don't feel safe," he said, "and the people see that."

Philippine navy Rear Adm. Alexander Pama agreed with Adams, and expressed how meaningful it is for Philippine troops to serve their countrymen. His troops also are pleased with their American partners and their efforts, he added.

"Volunteers, doctors, nurses, supplies -- all of this comes from donations from kind-hearted people in both the Philippines and the United States," said Pama, commander of naval forces in western Mindanao. "It definitely means a lot not only to the people who we serve, but for us who serve the people."

Pama praised the American military and civilian efforts in this event, noting support from the Lingkod Timog nonprofit group based out of Rhode Island. The group is made up of Filipino-Americans working to reverse poverty and improve health services in the Philippines. They work regularly with both militaries to reach out to areas in need.

"It's quite fortunate that we have the partners that we do," he said. "Groups coming all the way from the United States, [U.S. troops]; it's basically a synergy of everybody to reach out to these people, help them out so they don't feel so marginalized in society. It's not just the guys in uniform who are here. It's an extension of American society and their support for the people here."

A little good will goes a long way to improving security and bridging the gap between government and the local communities, Pama said. He explained that terrorists take advantage of impoverished areas by providing the poor with money and food in return for their support and, often, their service.

"Building strong bonds and relationships in the communities is a very important aspect to our security efforts," he said. "We all know bad guys thrive on the poor, and in the classic sense of counterinsurgency, the bad guys drain the pan.

"We want to come across to the people that we are the good guys," he continued, "and we need to pull the support away from the bad guys and let the people know that the government is after the people's welfare."

Ultimately, safety and security for the people is the most important aspect of the Philippine military mission. Events such as this, Pama said, give the people more than just money and temporary support. People get services they need without having to risk their lives or becoming indebted to criminals and terrorists.

"The happiness of the people is not very complicated," he said. "They need their basic services, and they need security. Events like this are going to be ingrained in their minds forever, that the good guys -- the military, the volunteers and the American military -- came here to help."

Wisconsin Air Guard recruiter among best in nation

By Master Sgt. Mike Smith

March 1, 2010 - Recently recognized as one of the National Guard's top recruiters, Senior Master Sgt. Connie Bacik ensures the Wisconsin Air National Guard is ready to serve Wisconsin and America while helping Citizen-Airmen achieve their career goals.

Bacik, who oversees recruiting and retention efforts for the Wisconsin Air National Guard, received an award as the 2009 Recruiting and Retention Superintendent of the year - one of eight top recruiters to be recognized during a formal banquet at the Air Guard's annual Recruiting and Retention Training Workshop in Dallas last week.

"This award is well-deserved," said Brig. Gen. John McCoy, commander of the Wisconsin Army National Guard. "Senior Master Sgt. Bacik is a tremendous asset to the Wisconsin Air National Guard. She is a consistent top performer and her efforts merit recognition not only for the number of recruits she helped bring in to the military, but for her ability to match their talents to our requirements."

Bacik spent most of her military career as a recruiter - her first recruiting position was in 1994. "I love being able to help people achieve their goals," she said just before the award ceremony.

"I've brought people in as cooks and seen them become pilots," she continued. "I didn't just put somebody in, I got them in the right place and helped them get to their future ... my feeling is that we recruit somebody for 20 years, not their first term."

In fact, Bacik recruited three of the Air Guard recruiters in Wisconsin.

Bacik climbed her way up the recruiting and retention ladder to the state's top recruiting position. As a superintendent, she advises and supports two Air Guard flying wings and a geographically separated unit and coordinates and communicates with the National Guard Bureau.

She credited the success to her team and to her skills as a motivator.

Filling critical vacancies was a big motivator last year, and officials said Bacik focused her team to fill them. The Wisconsin Air Guard also suddenly found itself in need of 100 maintenance Airmen for a new mission.

Her recruiting team met those challenges, she said. Recruiters from outside the unit helped fill those maintenance positions. Then a recruiting competition among them brought in 61 new Guard members between July and September, with 51 recruits filling critically needed vacancies.

"My team is fantastic," she said. "I have a great team."

Now, with vacancies and technical schools filling up and even some of the critical vacancies filling, Bacik said a growing concern is that she can only put people where there are actual positions. Another concern is the wait times for technical schools. Some new recruits tire of waiting for a school and cross over to the other services.

"It's really against my grain to turn away qualified people," Bacik said. "But we have been there before, and we will get through it."

Air Guard recruiters and retainers are on a two-year win streak with back-to-back fiscal year end-strength goals exceeded. It's a dramatic turnaround from years of missed goals.

In January, the Air Guard reported its monthly accession goal of 470 Airmen was exceeded with a total of 563 Airmen, or 120 percent. In December, it was 154 percent. "I cannot thank you all enough for the tremendous work that you do each and every day," said Col. Mary Salcido, director of Air Guard Recruiting and Retention. "I feel a great passion for the outstanding people in recruiting and retention."

The numbers are proof of their success, but challenges remain in officer recruiting as well as filling technical vacancies and the health professions. Even so, Salcido told the crowd that she is extremely confident that they would excel.

"We set our goal this year," said Tech. Sgt. Jeremee H. Tate. "Battlefield weather was our hardto- fill, and we filled them, just like that." Tate, the production recruiter of the year, brought in 101 people in 2009 - nearly double the yearly work of one recruiter.

"I recruited 70 people the year before, and then I stepped it up," he said, smiling. Tate admitted that the economy may have played a part in some of the success, because he did see bigger crowds at the job fairs. "But I would like to say that it's also the hard work that we did," he said.

He emphasized that the job is not just about numbers and percentages and goals - it's about people. Tate said his work is not complete until he follows each new individual through their initial training.

"We're the first people they see when they get back [from training], and I get to see that transition from civilian to Airman, and that's cool," he said. "Then, I actually see them working, supporting and functioning in the unit, and that's cool too."

Other winners recognized include:

Recruiting Office Supervisor of the Year: Master Sgt. Loren M. Bell, 146th Airlift Wing, California; Production Recruiter of the Year: Tech. Sgt. Jeremee H. Tate, 146th Airlift Wing, California; Recruiting/Retention Noncommissioned Officer of the Year: Master Sgt. Gary D. Dowling, 103rd Air Communications Squadron, Connecticut; Rookie Recruiter of the Year: Tech. Sgt. Eric D. Martin, 188th Fighter Wing, Arkansas; Retention Office Manager of the Year: Master Sgt. Roselina B. Weldon, 154th Wing, Hawaii; Rookie Retention Office Manager of the Year: Tech. Sgt. Paul F. Havran, 132nd Fighter Wing, Iowa; Unit Career Advisor of the Year: Master Sgt. Terri L. Rogers, 142nd Fighter Wing, Oregon.