Military News

Saturday, July 10, 2010

Author William Beck

Editor's Note: Beck is a former US Army Servicemember.


On July 22, 2010, Conversations with American Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with William Beck, USA, the Author of H.A.A.R.P.'s Fury, RED 7 and Caribbean Agenda.

Program Date: July 22, 2010
Program Time: 1700 hours Pacific
Topic: Author William Beck
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/lawenforcement/2010/07/23/author-william-beck

About the Guest
William Beck, USA “was born in Jefferson, Ohio near the shores of Lake Erie. After completing college he volunteered for service in the U.S. Army during the later years of the Vietnam War. William Beck’s “is a PADI certified scuba diver and underwater photographer. Beck is also an accomplished practitioner of the martial arts in Go Ju style karate and holds the rank of Sho Dan. Pistol marksman is another talent Beck possess and enjoys occupying his time with. Beck’s father was a master baker, and Beck acquired much of his culinary skills observing his parents practicing their talents as he was growing up. The latest aspiration for William Beck is studying to be a pilot. It has been a desire of his for many years and he looks forward to receiving his ‘wings.’ Beck enjoys spending his time between Florida and New England with family and friends when he is not in the Nashville, Tennessee area writing.” William Beck is the author of H.A.A.R.P.'s Fury, RED 7 and Caribbean Agenda.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is Police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. American Heroes Radio brings you to the watering hole, where it is Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in Law Enforcement, public policy, Public Safety Technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in Law Enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/lawenforcement/2010/07/23/author-william-beck
Archive:
http://www.americanheroesradio.com/william_beck.html

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Navy Medical Research Team Joins Partnership to Combat Malaria

By Doris Ryan, Naval Medical Research Center Public Affairs

LIMA, Peru (NNS) -- The U.S. Naval Medical Research Center Detachment (NMRCD) Peru has joined a consortium of institutions from Peru, Brazil and the United States to help eliminate malaria from the Amazon region.

The contributions of NMRCD to determine the incidence of vivax malaria in the study sites in Peru and Brazil will be a key complement to Navy medicine research and development efforts to develop and test vaccines in the future, said Capt. Richard L. Haberberger Jr., the commanding officer of the Naval Medical Research Center.

"This will be an important step forward for malaria research and will eventually contribute to the overall health of deployed sailors and Marines," said Haberberger. "This is why it is vital we maintain forward-deployed labs like NMRCD where there is a focus on force health protection, research and development, and public health diplomacy."

This center is supported by a seven-year, $9.2 million grant from the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). The principal investigator is Dr. Joseph Vinetz from the University of California at San Diego. The award for the Amazon Region Center of Excellence in Malaria Research was one of 10 grants announced July 8 by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the NIH.

A key component of this initiative will be to increase the research and public health capacity in the participating countries, providing training for students and researchers and engaging eminent scientists and physicians from Peru, Brazil and the United States.

NMRCD's parasitology and entomology programs will have integral roles in field and laboratory activities leading to the determination of malaria incidence rates, parasite genotyping, monitoring drug resistance and the determination of which mosquitoes are transmitting malaria in this area. The detachment will manage the Madre de Dios, Peru site, and will collaborate on activities in Iquitos, Peru, two of the three study locations of the center.

"NMRCD will also be responsible for the data management component of the program and capacity building efforts, standardizing and enhancing data processing and analysis, as well as assisting host-country partners to improve their ability to conduct malaria research as part of the center and utilize research findings for policy and program development," said Lt. Paul Graf, head of the parasitology department.

Dr. Andres G. Lescano, the deputy head of the parasitology department and director of public health training at NMRCD, will lead the data management core and training program. Along with Graf; Lt. Kirk Mundal, head of the entomology department, will be in charge of human and vector interaction studies in Madre de Dios and will also support activities in the other sites.

"This award and the partnership with world-class research centers in South America and the United States confirm the caliber of the work conducted in U.S. overseas research centers such as NMRCD. This center will develop a new generation of malaria researchers and will create important opportunities for the advancement of Navy Medicine research," said Cmdr. John W. Sanders, the officer-in-charge of NMRCD.

Malaria is a parasitic disease caused by a single-celled protozoan, transmitted to humans through the bite of the Anopheles mosquito, which serves as the vector for the parasite, incubating it and carrying it from human to human. Malaria represents a major threat to international travelers and historically has been a serious health risk for deployed U.S. military forces.

In fact, more work days were lost among U.S. military personnel due to malaria than to bullets during every military campaign fought in malaria-endemic regions during the 20th century. Currently, malaria is present in operationally important countries such as Iraq, Afghanistan and Korea, said Sanders.

NAVFAC Pacific Holds Change of Command Ceremony

By Don Rochon, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Pacific Public Affairs

PEARL HARBOR (NNS) -- Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Pacific held a change of command ceremony July 9 at the command's headquarters in Pearl Harbor.

Rear Adm. Kate Gregory relieved Rear Adm. Michael Giorgione as commander of NAVFAC Pacific.

Gregory was promoted to rear admiral June 1, becoming the first female Civil Engineer Corps (CEC) officer in the history of the Navy to attain the rank.

"Surely the Pacific theater is our Navy and nation's most important theater, and I appreciate the challenges we all face as we carry out our mission, and as we take care of our fleet, our families and our shore establishments," said Gregory, in her remarks to more than 200 command employees and guests. "We have a lot to do, and I'm ready to get started."

A St. Louis native, Gregory was commissioned as a CEC officer after graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1982. She arrives in Hawaii from Little Creek, Va., where she served as the chief of staff for the 1st Naval Construction Division. She is no stranger to Hawaii, as she previously served as executive officer during the transformation of Public Works Center Pearl Harbor to NAVFAC Hawaii.

Gregory's Seabee tours include assignments as company commander and detachment officer-in-charge, deploying to Honduras with Amphibious Construction Battalion 1, as the Seabee action officer at NAVFAC headquarters in Washington, D.C., and as the executive officer of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 1.

Gregory's first command tour was as commanding officer of NMCB 133, with deployments to the European and Western Pacific theaters. She subsequently served as commander, 30th Naval Construction Regiment, during which she deployed to the Al Anbar Province, Iraq, in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Gregory holds undergraduate and graduate degrees from the U.S. Naval Academy, the University of Southern California and George Washington University; has completed the Senior Executive Program at the London School of Business; is a registered professional engineer in the Virginia; and is a qualified military parachutist and Seabee combat warfare officer. Her personal decorations include the Legion of Merit, Meritorious Service Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, and the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal.

Gregory assumed command of approximately 4,000 military and civilian men and women who work for NAVFAC Pacific and its three NAVFAC commands in Hawaii, Guam and Japan.

Giorgione will retire from the Navy July 16 in a ceremony at Annapolis, Md., the place where he was commissioned a naval officer 29 years ago.

UBERCouple

Editor's Note:  The Guest is former USN.

On July 15, 2010, Conversations with American Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with James Howard, USN, the author of UBERCouple.

Program Date: July 15, 2010
Program Time: 1700 hours Pacific
Topic: UBERCouple
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/lawenforcement/2010/07/16/ubercouple
About the Guest
James Howard served in the United States Navy in the early 1960s. In addition to having been a sales professional for 30 years, he has been a draftsman, job developer and now and now an author of the booklet UBERCouple. James Howard said of UBERCouple, “Twenty years ago my new wife and I started fighting a bit too much. So to help smooth the relationship, I read a couple of excellent books on how to make your marriage happier and put what I read to work. It is now twenty plus years later, and my wife and I have an uber sort of life. I've never been happier. It was time to share. I've condensed the things that worked best into a booklet of seven brief, easy little things to creating a loving environment.”

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is Police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. American Heroes Radio brings you to the watering hole, where it is Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in Law Enforcement, public policy, Public Safety Technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in Law Enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/lawenforcement/2010/07/16/ubercouple
Archive:
http://www.americanheroesradio.com/ubercouple.html

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Veterans With Post-traumatic Stress Deserve Best Care

American Forces Press Service

The Veterans Affairs Department will begin making it easier for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to obtain the benefits and treatment they need starting next week, President Barack Obama said today in his weekly message, calling veteran care the nation's "solemn responsibility."

The full text of the message follows:

Last weekend, on the Fourth of July, Michelle and I welcomed some of our extraordinary military men and women and their families to the White House.

They were just like the thousands of active duty personnel and veterans I've met across this country and around the globe. Proud. Strong. Determined. Men and women with the courage to answer their country's call, and the character to serve the United States of America.

Because of that service; because of the honor and heroism of our troops around the world; our people are safer, our nation is more secure, and we are poised to end our combat mission in Iraq by the end of August, completing a drawdown of more than 90,000 troops since last January.

Still, we are a nation at war. For the better part of a decade, our men and women in uniform have endured tour after tour in distant and dangerous places. Many have risked their lives. Many have given their lives. And as a grateful nation, humbled by their service, we can never honor these American heroes or their families enough.

Just as we have a solemn responsibility to train and equip our troops before we send them into harm's way, we have a solemn responsibility to provide our veterans and wounded warriors with the care and benefits they've earned when they come home.

That is our sacred trust with all who serve – and it doesn't end when their tour of duty does.

To keep that trust, we're building a 21st century VA, increasing its budget, and ensuring the steady stream of funding it needs to support medical care for our veterans.

To help our veterans and their families pursue a college education, we're funding and implementing the post-9/11 GI Bill.

To deliver better care in more places, we're expanding and increasing VA health care, building new wounded warrior facilities, and adapting care to better meet the needs of female veterans.

To stand with those who sacrifice, we've dedicated new support for wounded warriors and the caregivers who put their lives on hold for a loved one's long recovery.

And to do right by our vets, we're working to prevent and end veteran homelessness – because in the United States of America, no one who served in our uniform should sleep on our streets.

We also know that for many of today's troops and their families, the war doesn't end when they come home.

Too many suffer from the signature injuries of today's wars: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury. And too few receive the screening and treatment they need.

Now, in past wars, this wasn't something America always talked about. And as a result, our troops and their families often felt stigmatized or embarrassed when it came to seeking help.

Today, we've made it clear up and down the chain of command that folks should seek help if they need it. In fact, we've expanded mental health counseling and services for our vets.

But for years, many veterans with PTSD who have tried to seek benefits – veterans of today's wars and earlier wars – have often found themselves stymied. They've been required to produce evidence proving that a specific event caused their PTSD. And that practice has kept the vast majority of those with PTSD who served in non-combat roles, but who still waged war, from getting the care they need.

Well, I don't think our troops on the battlefield should have to take notes to keep for a claims application. And I've met enough veterans to know that you don't have to engage in a firefight to endure the trauma of war.

So we're changing the way things are done.

On Monday, the Department of Veterans Affairs, led by Secretary Eric Shinseki, will begin making it easier for a veteran with PTSD to get the benefits he or she needs.

This is a long-overdue step that will help veterans not just of the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars, but generations of their brave predecessors who proudly served and sacrificed in all our wars.

It's a step that proves America will always be here for our veterans, just as they've been there for us. We won't let them down. We take care of our own. And as long as I'm Commander-in-Chief, that's what we're going to keep doing. Thank you.