Military News

Thursday, July 03, 2008

Symposium Identifies Issues to Advance Care of Soldiers, Families

By Navy Lt. Jennifer Cragg
Special to American Forces Press Service

July 1, 2008 - The U.S.
Army Wounded Warrior Program, called "AW2" for short, held its fourth annual symposium in Indianapolis last week to identify the most important issues to advance wounded soldier care, the program's director said yesterday. "The AW2 symposium is an important part of the Army's overall mission to improve care for wounded soldiers and their families," Army Col. Jim Rice said in a teleconference with online journalists and bloggers.

This year, AW2 brought together more than 70 severely wounded, injured and ill soldiers and their families to address issues important to them, Rice said.

"The issues were chosen from more than 80 topics that were discussed in focus groups, with categories including medical services, transition, family, continuation on active duty or active reserve duty, employment, and the Department of Veteran Affairs," Rice said.

The symposium's theme was "I am AW2."

"We chose this theme because the soldiers and the families are who we serve," Rice explained. "They are the AW2 program, and we wanted to hear their voices throughout the symposium. The wounded soldiers and family member delegates were engaged in a week of intensive focus groups discussing the issues, which were broken into various categories."

At the end of the week, all of the focus groups came together and presented the top issues in their category, the colonel said.

After the delegates voted, the top five overall issues they identified were:

-- Alternative treatment options for wounded warriors;

-- Support groups and counseling for wounded warrior families;

-- Processes for continuing on active duty or in the active reserve;

-- Treatment of soldiers by the physical evaluation boards for continuation on active duty or in the active reserve; and

-- Eligibility criteria for the Warrior Transition Program.

"It really is a continuing process of improvement, of support to these soldiers and their families," Rice said.

This year, for the first time, as part of the focus on the families of the severely wounded, the children of AW2 delegates were included in the symposium. The children participated in a day camp made possible by collaboration with the National
Military Family Association's Operation Purple, and they provided their own issues for consideration, the colonel said.

"The inclusion of children in the symposium is so important for our focus on the families of wounded soldiers," he said. "Both the wounded soldiers and their families have made sacrifices in their service to our country, and it is AW2's mission to serve them the very best we can."

Rice said more information is available about the Army Wounded Warrior Program by calling 800-237-1336 toll-free or visiting www.AW2.army.mil.

(
Navy Lt. Jennifer Cragg works in the New Media Directorate of the Defense Media Activity)

Incentives Help Sustain All-Volunteer Force, General Says

By John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service

July 1, 2008 - With competitive salaries, a top-notch retirement package, and now the option to share education benefits with family members, a career in the U.S.
military has become far more attractive since the days of the draft. Thirty-five years ago today, the armed forces ended involuntary enlistment and the all-volunteer force was born. Just as military equipment and tactics have evolved since the Vietnam War era, so have the incentives that entice and sustain men and women who volunteer to wear their nation's uniform.

"When you put the whole package together, it's becoming very attractive to join the military,"
Army Lt. Gen. Thomas F. Metz, director of the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization, said in an interview yesterday. "It can be a wonderful life."

When Metz volunteered for the
Army in 1966, he was one of only two men in his basic training company who had not been drafted.

"There was one kid from
Baltimore and myself. The rest of the company was draftees," he recalled. "I don't want to go back to that."

The general cited a combination of reasons why people enlist today: patriotism, the opportunity for worldly experience, and valuable training. But the lure of benefits, which have expanded since the advent of the all-volunteer force and continue to grow, also is an important draw.

"The first, and most tangible, was getting the pay scale on an equal footing with your counterpart on your civilian side," Metz said, describing the evolution of
military incentives. "That takes that differential off the table."

Disparity between civilian and
military salaries used to be a stumbling block for recruiters. But this is a nonissue now that servicemembers' pay -- based on their education and job experience -- is roughly equal to what they would make out of uniform, Metz said.

As pay scales equalized, servicemembers tended to replace their concerns about compensation with a less urgent focus on levels of job satisfaction. On a daily basis, the general said, the onus is with commanders and noncommissioned officers to create an environment in which military members feel fulfilled being part of the unit.

But in the long-term view of military careers, he added, the recruiting system has evolved since the draft to better match
military members with an occupation in which they're more likely to find enduring satisfaction.

This is contrary to the armed forces' days of yore, when draftees not only were forced into service, but also had no latitude to select their military job.

"When you force somebody to come into the service, then you force the
military skill on them that they may or may not be interested in," Metz said, "you've got a real uphill battle in the training and education of that soldier."

Now, however, recruiters use aptitude tests to steer enlistees into jobs they're most likely to enjoy, making them easier to train and educate. "It's just better for all concerned," Metz said.

Capping a military career is a retirement package which the general characterized as America's gold-standard pension.

"Once a person gets beyond those teenage years and begins to think a little bit deeper about their life, [they realize] you cannot build an annuity that matches the retirement of an armed forces member in the United States," he said.

The most recent enhancement to
military benefits came yesterday, when President Bush signed legislation that will increase servicemembers' education package and, for the first time, allows troops to transfer unused portions to family members.

Metz predicted the bill will have a direct impact on recruiting. He added that because military members now can obtain degrees as easily in uniform as they can as civilians, servicemembers could attend programs like those offered at the College of the American Soldier, and transfer unused GI Bill benefits to a spouse or child.

"The transfer of that GI educational benefit is a double win, because you could become a soldier, get an education, and get a family member's education," he said. "You're really getting a 'twofer.'"

The 42-year career soldier offered his praise for today's all-volunteer force. "They're doing an unbelievably good job," he said, "and we have got to have them continue."

U.S. Must Convey What Africa Command Will, Won't Be, Officials Say

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

July 1, 2008 - As U.S. Africa Command prepares to go fully operational, one of its big challenges will be communicating not only what it aims to achieve, but also what it doesn't, senior officials at the Pentagon and at the new command agree. AfriCom, which began initial operations Oct. 1, is slated to become an independent unified command three months from today. This will make it a full-fledged geographic combatant command on par with U.S. European Command, Pacific Command, Southern Command and Central Command, focusing on the African continent.

AfriCom will be responsible for all U.S.
military activity in Africa. The one exception will be Egypt, which will remain under U.S. Central Command.

The goal, as described by
Army Gen. William "Kip" Ward, AfriCom's commander, is to work in tandem with other U.S. government agencies and international partners to help African nations deal with a full range of challenges. AfriCom will support this effort through military-to-military programs, military-sponsored activities and other operations, all aimed at promoting a stable, secure Africa, the general said.

Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told reporters while visiting the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies here last week that the United States recognizes the "hugely important issues to be addressed in Africa."

"That's one of the reasons we stood up AfriCom, because it's such an important continent for us," he said.

Mullen cited Africa's tremendous resources, but said it faces great challenges as well, from poverty and disease to threats including
terrorists seeking safe haven.

"It's a place where there are opportunities for
terrorists to evolve," he told the AfriCom staff while visiting their headquarters. "We have to address those things, because if we don't, they are coming our way. Either we have to engage them or they are coming to us as a country, and actually, as a world."

The AfriCom headquarters will become fully operational a decade after the near-simultaneous Aug. 7, 1998,
terrorist attacks on the U.S. embassies in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Nairobi, Kenya. The 10 years since then have witnessed additional terrorist activity, including the double car-bombing of a United Nations building in Algiers in December. Mullen told the AfriCom staff that the Pan-Sahel region and Horn of Africa are particular concerns.

Americans historically have looked east and west to face off threats, but Mullen said AfriCom and SouthCom show increasing recognition that the focus needs to go beyond that. "America doesn't look north and south to its own detriment," he said.

Despite widespread recognition of the challenges facing Africa, Mullen acknowledged last week that AfriCom has suffered from misconceptions about its intent. He told reporters at the Marshall Center that the command's standup has met with "some pretty stiff resistance" from Nigeria, South Africa and some other countries in the region or with ties to it.

"I think some of it is tied to the newness of it," Mullen told reporters after a town hall meeting at the AfriCom headquarters. "We have not been ... heavily engaged in Africa historically, so there are questions from people on the continent. There are questions from those who have been engaged historically, some of the former countries who were colonial powers in that part of the world."

Mullen said the United States needs to constantly repeat the intent behind AfriCom to clear up those questions and dispel misconceptions. But ultimately, he said, actions will speak louder than words. "I fundamentally believe we communicate most effectively through our actions," he told the AfriCom town hall session.

The United States has no interest in a big troop presence in Africa, the chairman said. AfriCom's headquarters will remain in Stuttgart -- also home to EuCom, which has had primary responsibility for Africa -- for at least the next several years.

"It is my view that it is much more important to emphasize projects and engagement than it is footprint," Mullen said.

Navy Vice Adm. Robert T. Moeller, AfriCom's deputy commander for military operations, emphasized during an address at the Brookings Institute earlier this month that the command also has no intention of stepping on the toes of other organizations' work there. He said the command will support -- not disrupt or confuse -- ongoing U.S. government, international and nongovernmental efforts in Africa.

Ward described
military engagement the United States already has with Africa during testimony before the House Armed Services Committee in March. U.S. soldiers and Marines provide military training to African peacekeepers and professional development at the individual and unit level. The Air Force contributes airlift and logistical support. U.S. forces provide special operations counterterrorism training teams to strengthen national capabilities and enhance multinational cooperation. The Navy and Coast Guard are helping African nations increase maritime safety and security.

"Our intent is to enable them to provide for their own security," Ward told the committee.

He cited other U.S. agencies that also contribute toward this effort. The State Department's Africa Contingency Operations Training and Assistance program has helped prepare thousands of African troops for international peacekeeping missions. In addition, U.S. forces work hand in hand with the U.S. Agency for International Development to support numerous humanitarian missions in Africa, he noted.

Moeller stressed that AfriCom isn't trying to move into the foreign policy realm or militarize U.S. foreign policy. Rather, he said, the command will support the State Department and other U.S. agencies working in Africa.

Ambassador Mary Carlin Yates, AfriCom's deputy for
civil-military affairs and former ambassador to Ghana and Burundi, said the command's mix of "hard" and "soft" power elements in a single organization will bring added value to ongoing operations in Africa. While helping to bring capacity to the Africans, she said, it will support other programs by the United States and others.

Ward took that message to Lisbon earlier this month for a meeting with the Commonwealth of Portuguese Speaking Nations. The group conducts peacekeeping operations and disaster response exercises with five African nations: Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea Bissau, Mozambique, Sao Tome and Principe.

"Every nation around the world benefits from a stable and secure Africa, but each has limited resources to apply toward security capacity-building efforts," Ward told the Commonwealth of Portuguese Speaking Nations representatives. "Together we can cooperate to bring coherent programs to the African continent."

Like others, Ward said has heard the "Why now?" questions about AfriCom's standup. As he escorted Mullen around the command's headquarters facilities last week, he said the more significant question should be: "Why not now?"

Army Commemorates 35 Years of All-Volunteer Force

By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service

July 1, 2008 - Thirty-one soldiers celebrated the 35th anniversary of the all-volunteer force by enlisting or re-enlisting in the Pentagon courtyard today.
Army Secretary Pete Geren said more than 1 million active, Guard and reserve soldiers, more than 200,000 Army civilians, and more than 600,000 Army family members have made the all-volunteer force a success and the envy of the world.

"Our Army is the strength of our nation, because our soldiers, civilians and families do stand together -- and stand together no matter how tough the times get," Geren said.

Geren turned to the 16 soldiers who were re-enlisting and the 15 who were enlisting and told them they are part of the "best-led, best-trained and the best-equipped
Army on the face of the Earth."

The secretary thanked the soldiers for their commitment and called them "the greatest of this generation."

The all-volunteer force is a national treasure, the
Army secretary said. It didn't start that way. In 1973, the Army faced almost insurmountable odds. The draftee Army suffered from the same ills that plagued society -- drugs, Vietnam and volatile race relations.

Army Chief of Staff Gen. George W. Casey Jr. remembered what life was like as he reported to his first unit in Germany in 1971 -- two years before the all-volunteer force. When he reported to his first unit, "there were nine guys in the platoon," Casey said following the ceremony. "Four of them were pending chapter discharges [for drug use]. I had one noncommissioned officer who was an E-6 who was pretty squared-away. Everybody else was just an acting sergeant.

"It took getting rid of those guys and getting an influx of new troops before we could build a good platoon," he continued. "It was a really different
Army. We carried loaded .45s as we pulled our duty officer duties back then. We never had to take it out, but it was an incredibly different Army."

Casey said the one development of the last 35 years that made the biggest difference to the service was the noncommissioned officer corps. "They're the ones who take these kids and shape them into men and women who become real soldiers," he said. "That's what it is all about."

Iowa Guard Civil Support Team Pulls Poisons From Flood Waters

By Air Force Master Sgt. Mike R. Smith
Special to American Forces Press Service

July 1, 2008 - Although
terrorists are not responsible for the rain waters flooding the Midwest, at least one National Guard counterterrorism unit was wet and waist-deep in a battle here to protect their communities. Tapping into their emergency support knowledge, the Iowa National Guard's 22 citizen-soldiers and -airmen of the 71st Weapons of Mass Destruction Civil Support Team have waded through the state's flood waters since June 16 to help officials assess chemicals and other potentially hazardous materials floating through their towns and cities.

Nearly 6,000 National Guard members have assisted
civil authorities and responded to callouts by their governors in five states for the destructive and record-setting Midwest floods since early June.

The
Iowa Guard's federally funded civil support team normally responds to events known or suspected to involve the use of chemical, biological or radiological agents. But the team members used their hazardous materials expertise, as well as their communication systems and their relationship with state and federal agencies, to identify and secure more than 130 hazardous substances dislodged by the flood in unmarked containers, gas cans, barrels and thousand-gallon chemical tanks.

"Customarily, we train and function in the counterterrorism role,"
Army Lt. Col. Timothy Glynn, CST commander, said.

But in
Iowa, more than 45,000 people were displaced by at least 600 miles of rivers overflowing their banks. Glynn said the flood challenged his specialized response team to find a productive role to assist civil authorities, aside from its standard role in WMD events.

"We had to figure out what our place was," he said. "It's too easy to suddenly think, 'Let's go fill sandbags,' when you have a highly specialized group of trained individuals."

Oddly, protecting the public and the environment from dangerous substances crossed over from a terror response role to a natural disaster response role for the CST.

Fifty-eight
Iowa counties came under federal disaster declaration. With thousands of unknown, dangerous substances literally floating away from garages and industrial sites, officials said, the state faced a major challenge locating and identifying its hazardous materials to protect the public.

The CST decided to help the state's department of natural resources set up a command center for their hazardous materials response, which provided data and voice communications. The team also established contacts with hazardous materials storage sites to see if they had any problems, on behalf of the state. They even sent out survey teams in trucks and boats to locate and identify hazardous items along rivers near Des Moines,
Iowa City, Cedar Falls and Cedar Rapids.

Glynn said the team joined with conservation agents to recover more than 5,700 suspected containers. From them, they identified 58 hazardous materials containers found on land and 69 found in the water. They also found and identified 15 hazardous materials containers through aerial reconnaissance missions with the
civil Air Patrol.

"It worked well," Glynn said. He explained that a short disaster response period affected the amount of state and federal infrastructure and personnel in place for the floods. Some agencies, he explained, did not have full response teams available for two weeks, so the CST filled the gaps until civil authorities could take over.

Glynn said he would hand off the CST mission to Environmental Protection Agency officials next week.

"As the National Guard, we're ready to help and respond ... to plug a gap that exists with the
civil authorities, and that's what we did," Glynn said. "As soon as they are able to ramp up, then we graciously back out."

The National Guard operates 55 weapons of mass destruction civil support teams, including one in each of the 54 states and territories, with two CSTs in California. The nation's first CST was certified and fully operational in August 2001. The
Iowa Guard's 71st CST was certified and fully operational in January 2002.

(
Air Force Master Sgt. Mike R. Smith serves with the National Guard Bureau.)

DoD Establishes New Physical Disability Board

The Defense Department announced today the establishment of a new Physical Disability Board of Review (PDBR) to review disability ratings of wounded warriors and provide another avenue of administrative recourse for our wounded veterans. The Air Force has been designated as lead DoD component for operation and management of the PDBR.

"The PDBR has no greater obligation to our wounded, ill, and injured service members and former service members than to offer fair and equitable recommendations pertaining to the assignment of disability ratings," said Under Secretary for Personnel and Readiness David S.C. Chu.

The PDBR will reassess the accuracy and fairness of the combined disability ratings assigned to service members who were discharged as unfit for continued
military service by the military departments with a combined disability rating of 20 percent or less, and were not found to be eligible for retirement. The PDBR will not review the military departments' determinations of fitness for continued military service. Instead, the PDBR will review the combined disability ratings assigned to the specific conditions that resulted in a member being declared unfit for continued military service, acted upon by the military department Physical Evaluation Boards.

Any service member may have his or her case reviewed by the PDBR if he or she meets certain conditions. The member must have been separated from the Armed Forces between Sept. 11, 2001, and Dec. 31, 2009, due to unfitness for continued
military service resulting from a physical disability under chapter 61 of title 10, U.S. Code. Additionally, the member must have received a combined disability rating of 20 percent or less, and have been found not eligible for retirement. By law, once adopted by the service secretary, a PDBR recommendation is final, and removes the service member's option to pursue subsequent review through the respective military department's Board for the Correction of Military Records.

Service members may request the PDBR review their case if these conditions are met. Alternatively, the PDBR may itself decide to review an individual's case, pending consent of the service member. Generally, individuals will apply for PDBR review through their respective
military department, however more specific guidance will be provided by the Air Force.

Wiesbaden Celebrates Berlin Airlift Anniversary

By Ray Johnson
Special to American Forces Press Service

June 30, 2008 - In 1948, a political and
military Cold War began when Berlin nearly fell into Josef Stalin's hands. Stranded deep inside Soviet-controlled territory, 2 million Germans faced starvation. The resulting Allied response -- the Berlin Airlift -- not only saved a population, but also launched a friendship between countries that had been at war three years earlier.

Sixty years later, thousands of Americans and Germans -- including participants in the legendary humanitarian mission and survivors of the blockade -- gathered here for two days to celebrate the airlift's anniversary.

"Today is my best day in command," Col. Ray Graham, commander of U.S.
Army Garrison Wiesbaden, said at a June 26 breakfast held in honor of 24 U.S. and German veterans. "I'm sure Air Force Brig. Gen. Joseph Smith felt the same way [on June 26, 1948] as he stood on the airfield and watched the first aircraft lumber off the runway and disappear into the clouds for Berlin, signifying the start of an undertaking the likes of which the world had never known."

It was from Wiesbaden
Army Airfield that pilots, flying C-47 Skytrains, C-54 Skymasters, C-82 Packets and C-74 Globemasters made two-hour jumps -- often harassed by Soviet Yak fighter jets -- to Berlin's Tempelhof Airport. All together, 28,299 airlift sorties were launched from Wiesbaden during the 15-month operation, delivering 326,137 tons of food, medicine and coal.

Overall, American and British aircrews kept the beleaguered city alive with almost 280,000 flights that covered 92 million miles and carried 2.3 million tons of supplies.

"We brought in the things that people needed to stay alive, to stay free," said retired
Air Force Col. Gail Halvorsen, 87, known as "the Candy Bomber" for dropping gum and chocolate to Berlin's children. "That gives you the magnitude of this operation. It was fantastic."

And while pilots such as Halvorsen have been recognized throughout the years for their exploits, those working on the ground also played a major role in the airlift's success.

Crew chief Johnny Macia, a private first class at the time, said everyone involved "had a job to do and we got it done; aircraft were arriving every 90 seconds at Tempelhof."

The retired master sergeant recalled that aircraft were tearing up the runways. "[They] had men and women on the sides with shovels, sand and tar filling up the holes," he said. "It took everyone to run the operation."

German citizens shared the burden. Kurt Lehmann, who helped in building Berlin's Tegel Airport, recalls the period as being tough for all European citizens -- not just Berliners -- as the Soviets enforced their will on embattled smaller countries. "That's why we started the airlift, ... [and] why people survived," he said.

For these daring actions, every airlift veteran was instrumental in shaping the Europe of today, said Helmut Mueller, Wiesbaden's lord mayor, during a June 26 speech at Wiesbaden
Army Airfield. "One thing we can say with certainty," he said, "without the Berlin Airlift, the reunification of Germany and Europe would not have been possible."

Wiesbaden hosted an open house yesterday, the first public event at Wiesbaden since Sept. 11, 2001. More than 10,000 people attended an eight-hour show that provided static aircraft displays -- including an
Air Force C-17 Globemaster III -- as well as helicopter candy drops and a meet-and-greet session with the veterans, including Bill Morrissey, who labeled the tributes "overwhelming."

"It's been a joy, ... but with sadness," said Morrissey, who at 18 served as an American air traffic controller at the former Celle Royal
Air Force Station in the British sector of post-World War Two Germany.

"Remembrance is tough," he said, referring to the 77 men -- 32 American, 39 British and six German -- who died during the airlift.

(Ray Johnson works in the Public Affairs Office at U.S.
Army Installation Management Command, Europe.)

America Supports You: 'Hire A Hero' Launches Campaign to Thank Troops

By Samantha L. Quigley
American Forces Press Service

June 30, 2008 - The goal of a troop-support group's new Web-based campaign is simple: tell the troops "thank you" a million times over, starting today. Hire A Hero, which works to connect
military job seekers and military-friendly employers, has created the "One Million Thank Yous" campaign to do just that.

"We ... know that servicemembers are not aware of the tremendous amount of support that exists for them," said Brac Selph, executive director of Hire A Hero. "We want servicemembers to have a virtual place they can go to remind themselves that what they are doing is appreciated and necessary for Americans to live the way they live."

Though a beta version on the "One Million Thank Yous" Web site launched on Memorial Day, the campaign officially launches today, Selph said. Americans are encouraged to help Hire A Hero thank servicemembers by submitting a "thank you" e-mail through the Hire A Hero Web site through Veterans Day to help reach the 1 million "thank you" goal.

Troops and their families can read the messages already received online at the "One Million Thank Yous" section of Hire A Hero's Web site, www.hireahero.org.

The organization is looking not only for more creative ways to get the messages in front of servicemembers, but also for partners in this endeavor.

"Some ideas that have been suggested [include] monitors playing the messages as troops disembark, printed booklets with several hundred of the messages to be distributed to the troops [or] an art project to memorialize the messages in the real world," Selph said. "We are still trying to finalize this part of the project."

The "One Million Thank Yous" project, though relatively straight-forward, has a secondary goal to solidify the distinction between supporting the troops and political opinion of the war, Selph added.

"Most everyone we speak to, regardless of political affiliation or opinion about the war, supports our troops," he said.

Hire A Hero is a supporter of America Supports You, a Defense Department program connecting citizens and companies with servicemembers and their families serving at home or abroad.

New Policy Aims to Help Prevent Loss of Leave

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

June 30, 2008 - Servicemembers expecting to lose annual leave on Sept. 30 due to caps on carryover leave will be the first to benefit from a new policy that allows them to
keep more annual leave, earn or hold on to certain special leave categories, and in some cases, sell back accrued leave. The new
military leave policy, part of the fiscal 2008 National Defense Authorization Act, allows troops to carry over 75 days rather than the previous 60 days into the next fiscal year, Sam Retherford, the Pentagon's deputy director of officer personnel management, told American Forces Press Service.

The new policy, in place until Dec. 31, 2010, is expected to reduce the amount of lost leave caused by the current high operating tempo. Quality-of-life surveys conducted over the past five years show that about 13 percent of the force lost up to 20 days leave each year, Retherford said. Senior noncommissioned officers and officers who have accrued more leave were the most likely to be affected.

The Defense Department had been proposing policies to fix the situation, and welcomes Congress' support for measures that raise the leave carryover ceiling, increase the amount of "special accrued leave" earned in a contingency zone operation, and provides another opportunity for troops to sell back used leave, Retherford said.

The new policy also extends the period servicemembers deployed to a combat zone or supporting a contingency operation have to use their accrued leave. Those who served in a combat zone now have up to four years to reduce their leave from the maximum 120 days to the 75-day cap provided for under the new provision.

Those supporting contingency operations can take up to three years to get their leave down to the new cap.

The new policy also allows enlisted members to sell back up to 30 days of special accrued leave – leave earned in a combat zone or designated contingency operation -- they would otherwise have lost beyond the 120-day limit, Retherford said. Leave accrued in a combat zone is more valuable than regular leave, because it is not taxed, he said.

Enlisted troops can sell back leave when they re-enlist or when they leave the
military with an honorable discharge. Officers can sell back leave only when separating from the military under honorable conditions.

Troops can sell back only 60 days of leave over the span of their career, Retherford said.

The new policy also extends the special rest and recuperation absence from 15 to 20 days for troops completing an overseas duty tour extension longer than 12 months and electing government-paid transportation. Those who pay for their own transportation for special rest and recuperation are still authorized the previous 30 days absence.

The new
military leave policy ensures that servicemembers don't lose out because they're unable to take leave due to the high operating tempo, Retherford said.

"Lost leave is an issue, because leave is an entitlement. It is worth money," he said. "This new policy sends the message that the department values the worth of the entitlement, but recognizes that there is not always the opportunity for people to take leave because of the current operational environment."

MILITARY CONTRACTS June 30, 2008

AIR FORCE

The
Air Force is modifying an indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract for a maximum of $3,100,000,000 ($850,000,000 increase in total ceiling amount) with General Dynamics Network Systems, Incorporated of Needham, Mass. The Intelligence Information, Command and Control, Equipment and Enhancements (ICE2) contract provides worldwide information technology (IT) sustainment and technical support. The contractor provides computer equipment support consisting of preventive and remedial maintenance of hardware and inventory management. The option period of the contract expires 30 Jun. 2008. This increase will allow task orders to continue to Jun. 2008. At this time no funds have been obligated. Warner-Robins Air Logistics Center, 330 Aircraft Sustainment Wing, 560 Aircraft Sustainment Group, Contracting Division, Robins AFB, Ga., is the contracting activity (F09603-03-D-0095-P00008).

Lockheed Martin Corp., Missiles and Fire Control of
Orlando, Fla., is being awarded a firm fixed price contract for $80,000,000. The contract action will provide Gunship Multi-Spectral System 2 for the AC-130 Gunship. The purchase will include the 12 production units, 3 readiness spares packages kits, depot level spares, technical orders and data. At this time all funds have been obligated. 667th AESS/PK, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8629-08-C-2402).

Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation, Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Electronic Systems of Linthicum Heights, Md., is being awarded a cost plus fix fee contract for $20,842,119. This action will develop and mature critical technologies required to enable airborne stand-off electronic attack. These technologies include low band, high-power transmitting phased arrays, mid band high-power transmitting phased arrays, and advanced exciters. At this time $3,073,000 has been obligated. AFRL/PKSE, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8650-08-C-1397).

Vangent, Inc. of Arlington, Va., is being awarded a firm fixed price contract for $13,590,654. The Royal Saudi
Air Force Web Based E-Learning System Modernization Program includes the procurement, installation, configuration, test and delivery of the School of Command, Control, and Communication (C3) E-Learning systems, its supporting equipment and IT Infrastructure. The system includes the conversion, configuration, installation and test of approximately 1,405 converted CBT modules, equipment, and capabilities, and the modernization of a conference room, and classrooms. The objective of this program is to deliver to the RSAF DAT SC3 a state-of the art WBES that meets the requirements while RSAF continues with the current training capabilities of the School of C3. At this time $11,000,008 has been obligated. 350th Electronic Systems Group, Hanscom AFB, Mass., is the contracting activity (FA8706-08-C-0009).

BMC Software Distribution, Inc. of
Houston, Texas, is being awarded a firm fixed price contract for $9,681,350. This new contract award serves to procure BMC software products, support, maintenance, deployment services, and training for the Combat Information Transport System Program Office. At this time all funds have been obligated. 667th Electronic Systems Center, 653d Electronic Systems Wing, 753d Electronic Systems Group, Contracting Division, Hanscom AFB, Mass., is the contracting activity (FA8731-08-F-8053).

The Boeing Co., Integrated Defense Systems, of Wichita, Kan., is being awarded a firm fixed price contract for a maximum of $7,793,273. This will provide the Evolutionary Data Link Phase III contract support and delivery of complete Production Kits (Group A and B), Upgrade Kits (partial kits to upgrade aircraft already flying with EDLPII, and 1553 Bus Interface Equipment. EDLPIII replaces existing (obsolete) laptops with newer laptops, replace existing (obsolete) remote display monitors and incorporates operational/maintenance enhancements to existing Group A (installation hardware) equipment: A-Kits -56 each; B-Kits 30 each; Upgrade Kits-20 each; Data-NSP; Program Support one Lot; Extended Monthly Operations-0 Lots; 1553 PCMICA Card – 30 each; 153 Bus S/V Module – 90 each. At this time $7,535,702 has been obligated. Department of the
Air Force, 327th Aircraft Sustainment Group Contracting Division, Tinker AFB, Okla., is the contracting activity (FA8107-08-D-0002 (First Order: FA8107-08-D-0002-0001 contains funds of obligation)).

Eaton Aerospace LLC of Jackson, Miss., is being awarded an indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract for a maximum of $7,801,000. This action will provide B1B aircraft, quantity of 83 Axial Piston Pumps. At this time $2,407 has been obligated. DSCR-ZBAD, Tinker AFB, Okla., is the contracting activity (SPRTA1-08-D-0001).

The
Air Force is modifying a cost plus incentive fee/fixed price award fee contract not to exceed $6,125,000 with McDonnell Douglas Corp., A Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of the Boeing Co., of Long Beach, Calif. This contract modification is a foreign military sales (FMS) requirement for the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) C-17 Globemaster III Sustainment Partnership (GSP) program. This action incorporates the FY08 Quarter IV Option Exercise for site activation and material for RAAF aircraft sustainment. At this time no funds have been obligated. AFMC/516 AESW/516 AESG/SYK, Area B, Bldg 558, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8614094-C-2004 P00254).

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

SNCT, dba SNC Manufacturing, Orocovis, Puerto Rico* *,is being awarded a maximum $51,155,550 firm fixed price, total set aside, eight(a) sole source contract for universal camouflage trousers and coveralls. Other locations of performance are also in Puerto Rico. Using service is
Army. There was originally 1 proposal solicited with one response. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is January 15, 2010. The contracting activity is Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa. (SPM1C1-08-D-1087).

Maytag Aircraft Corp., Colorado Springs, Colo., is being awarded a maximum $14,706,100.00 firm fixed price contract for operation and maintenance services of bulk fuel facilities. Other locations of performance are N.J., Del., Va., N.C., S.C., and Ga. Using service is
Air Force. The original proposal was Web solicited with 12 responses. This is a five-year multiyear contract. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is Aug. 1, 2013. The contracting activity is Defense Energy Support Center, Fort Belvoir, Va. (SPO600-08-C-5827).

NAVY

FLIR Systems Inc., North Billerica, Mass., is being awarded a maximum value $49,767,994 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite quantity contract for Short Range - Ground Mobility Visual Augmentation Systems (SR-GMVAS). The SR-GMVAS will be installed on
military ground vehicles of various types and will provide short-range surveillance, identification, detection and limited tracking capabilities in all light and weather conditions. Work will be performed in North Billerica, Mass., and is expected to be completed by Jun. 2013. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via Federal Business Opportunities website, with five offers received. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Ind., is the contracting activity (N00164-08-D-JQ03).

Sensor and Antenna Systems, Lansdale, Inc., Lansdale, Pa., is being awarded a $39,988,000 not-to-exceed contract to procure 24 Low Band Transmitters; 22 V-Pol Antennas; 24 H-Pol antennas; 16 Band 2 Adapter interface Assemblies; and spare and repair parts for the AN/ALQ-99 Low Band Transmitter Antenna Group in support of the EA-6B aircraft. Work will be performed in Lansdale, Pa., and is expected to be completed in Jan. 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Air Systems Command is the contracting activity (N00019-08-C-0046).

The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Mo., is being awarded a $22,000,000 ceiling-priced delivery order against a previously issued Basic Ordering Agreement (N68335-06-G-0024) for the procurement of 449 F/A-18F Peculiar Support Equipment (PSE) items for the F/A-18 Royal Australian
Air Force (RAAF) fleet under the Foreign military Sales Program. Work will be performed in St. Louis, Mo. and is expected to be completed in Dec. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, N.J. is the contracting activity.

Lockheed Martin Corp., Marietta, Ga., is being awarded a $7,891,675 modification to a previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N00019-04-D-0001) for contractor logistics support and technical engineering support services for the KC-130J, F/R/T Series Aircraft, and C-130J variant aircraft with similar components and/or systems. Work will be performed in Marietta, Ga., and is expected to be completed in Dec. 2008. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

BE&K Government Group, LLC, Birmingham, Ala., is being awarded a $16,755,000 firm-fixed price contract for expansion/renovation of
NAVY Exchange, Building CD13 at Naval Station Norfolk. Work will be performed in Norfolk, Va., and is expected to be completed by Jun. 2010. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the NAVY Electronic Commerce Online website with four proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (N40085-08-C-9604).

Bay Electric Co., Inc.*, Newport News, Va., is being awarded $5,858,305 for firm-fixed-price task order #0002 under a previously awarded multiple award construction contract (N40085-06-D-6006) for design and construction of a Marine Special Operations Complex fire station at
Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune. Work will be performed in Jacksonville, N.C., and is expected to be completed by Nov. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Three proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity.

T. B. Penick & Sons, Inc.,
San Diego, Calif., is being awarded $6,589,000 for firm-fixed price Task Order #0002 under a previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple award construction contract for design and construction of a child development center at Chollas Heights. Work will be performed in San Diego, Calif., and is expected to be completed by Sept. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Five proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity (N62473-08-D-8612).

Harry Pepper & Associates, Inc.,
Jacksonville, Fla., is being awarded a $13,985,658 firm-fixed-price contract for renovation and repair of Dock 146 at Naval Support Activity, Panama City. The work to be performed provides for construction work for restoration and modernization of the dock. The contract contains three options totaling $970,000, which may be exercised within 120 calendar days, bringing the total contract amount to $14,955,658. Work will be performed in Panama City, Fla., and is expected to be completed by Nov. 2009. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the NAVY Electronic Commerce Online website with three proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southeast, Jacksonville, Fla., is the contracting activity (N69450-08-C-0759).

Butt Construction Co., Inc.*, Dayton, Ohio, is being awarded a $9,411,000 firm-fixed price contract for design and construction of the
Marine Corps Reserve Center at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. The work to be performed provides for the design and construction of two buildings located close to the new MCRC administration facility -- an administration facility and a vehicle maintenance facility. Work will be performed in Dayton, Ohio, and is expected to be completed by Mar. 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively negotiated via the NAVY Electronic Commerce Online Website with five proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Midwest, Great Lakes, Ill., is the contracting activity (n40083-08-c-0054).

Korte Construction Co., DBA the Korte Co., highland, Ill., is being awarded $7,943,536 for firm-fixed price task order #0002 under a previously awarded multiple award construction contract (N40083-06-d-4021) for design and construction of the special weapons assessment facility at Naval Support Activity, Crane, Ind. The work to be performed provides for the design and construction of a two-story firing building and an adjacent three cell earth covered operation and storage building, and two remote site type e box magazines. The work also includes the demolition of the existing firing building and 12 magazines as well as wetlands mitigation, new target emplacements and firing points, backstops, a ballistic protection screen wall, as well as down range power, fiber and data lines to all target emplacements and firing points. Work will be performed in Crane, Ind., and is expected to be completed by Feb. 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Four proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Midwest, Public Works Department, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity.

Army

Luhr Bros., Inc., Columbia, Ill., was awarded on Jun. 27, 2008, a $7,033,445.00 firm fixed price, construction contract for Stone Dike Construction at various locations in the Mississippi River between miles 783.0 to 650.0. Westover Bendway Weirs: The work consists of furnishing all plant, labor and materials for constructing the Westover Bendway Weirs No. 1 thru 5 by placing Graded Stone A and incidental related work will be rquired. Riprap paving will be placed on the bank location at each weir. Plum Point Dikes: The work consists of furnishing all plant, labor and materials for constructing Plum Point Dikes 3,3 Trail and 4 by placing Graded Stone A and incidental related work will be required. Riprap paving will be placed on bank location at each dike. Norfolk Star Dikes: The work consists of furnishing all plant, labor and materials for constructing Norfolk Star Dikes 1, 2, 3 and 4 by placing Graded Stone A and incidental related work will be required. Riprap paving will be placed on bank location at each dike. Work will be performed at the aforementioned locations with an estimated completion date of Dec. 30, 2008. Twelve bids were solicited with one bid received. U.S.
Army Engineer District Memphis, Memphis, Tenn., is the contracting activity (W912EQ-08-C-0021).

Caddell Construction Co., Montgomery, Ala., was awarded on Jun. 27, 2008, a $44,417,850.00 firm fixed price contract for design and construction of a Reception Station

Processing Center, general purpose storage building and a lighted multi-purpose athletic field with a running track and associated physical training areas. Supporting facilities include site preparation; water, sanitary sewer, and natural gas connections and underground electrical distribution, grading, paving, walks, curbs and gutters, and wetland mitigation. Also, complete the design of and construction for the conversion of existing building numbers 3020 and 3021 to a Training Support Center. Supporting facilities include Privately Owned Vehicle (POV) parking relocation due to antiterrorism protection criteria and site improvements. Work is to be performed at Fort Benning, Ga., with an estimated completion date of Aug. 30, 2010. Four bids were solicited with three bids received. U.S.
Army Engineer District, Savannah, Ga., is the contracting activity (W912HN-07-D-0056).

Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Co., LLC, Oak Brook, Ill., was awarded on Jun. 27, 2008, a $5,376,200.00 firm fixed price, construction contract for dredging of the Miss. River, harbors, and new construction of Northwest Tenn. Harbor. Performance will take place at various harbors on the Mississippi River with work estimated to be completed by Dec. 31, 2008. U.S.
Army Engineer District Memphis, Memphis, Tenn., is the contracting activity (W912EQ-08-D-0005).

Hutchinson Industries, Trenton, NJ, was awarded on June 27, 2008, a $55,734,937.20 firm fixed price contract for 56,520 Wheel and Tire Assemblies. Performance will take place in Trenton, N.J., with an estimated completion date of Mar. 31, 2009. Bids were solicited via the Web with one bid received. Tank & Automotive Command, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-08-C-0482).

AM General LLC, South Bend, Ind., was awarded on Jun. 26, 2008, a $128,504,465 firm-fixed price contract for frag seven kits via the undefinitized contractual action needed to improve overhead protection for up-armored high mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicles. Work will be performed in Mishawaka, Ind., and is expected to be completed by Dec. 31, 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. One bid was solicited on Mar. 17, 2006. TACOM, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (DAAE07-01-C-S001).

JLG Industries, Inc., was awarded on Jun. 26, 2008, a $14,539,042 firm-fixed price contract for the All Terrain Lifter
Army System rough terrain forklift. Work will be performed in McConnellsburg, Pa., and is expected to be completed by Jun. 30, 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. One bid was solicited on Feb. 18, 2005, and one bid was received. TACOM, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-05-C-0229).

General Dynamics Ordnance & Tactical Systems, Scranton, Pa., was awarded on Jun. 26, 2008, a $13,865,374 firm-fixed price contract for projectile metal parts and burster casings. Work will be performed in Scranton, Pa., and is expected to be completed by Sept. 30, 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. National
technology Industrial Base bids were accepted on Mar. 13, 2008, and two were received. Headquarters, Army Sustainment Command, Rock Island, Ill., is the contracting activity (W52P1J-08-D-0061).

MILITARY CONTRACTS July 1, 2008

ARMY

Kiewit Building Group, Inc., Omaha, Neb., was awarded on Jun. 30, 2008, a $60,836,828 firm fixed price contract for a new medical and dental clinic. Work will be performed at Fort Carson, Colo., and is expected to be completed by Jan. 26, 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Web bids were solicited on Oct. 17, 2007, and six bids were received. U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha, Neb., is the contracting activity (W9128F-08-C-0012).

Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Co, LLC, Oak Brook, Ill., was awarded on Jun. 27, 2008, a $52,438,000 firm fixed price contract for Kill Van Kull channels in N.Y. and N.J. Harbor and channels navigation improvement. Work will be performed in Kill Van Kull Channel, N.Y. and N.J. Harbor. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Web bids were solicited on Mar. 3, 2008, and three bids were received. U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers, N.Y., N.Y., is the contracting activity (W912DS-08-C-0016).

Sikorsky Aircraft Corp., Stratford, Conn., was awarded on Jun. 30, 2008, a $46,310,832 firm fixed price contract for four UH-60M helicopters, material inspection and installation of auxiliary power unit kits. Work will be performed in Stratford, Conn., and is expected to be completed on Dec. 31, 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. One bid was solicited on Oct. 20, 2005. U.S.
Army Aviation & Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-08-C-0003).

General Atomics Aeronautical System,
San Diego, Calif., was awarded on Jun. 27, 2008, a $33,619,359 cost plus fixed fee contract for logistics support for I-GNAT, Warrior Alpha and Sky Warrior Unmanned Aircraft systems at multiple locations. Work will be performed in San Diego, Calif., and is expected to be completed by Jan. 31, 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. One bid was solicited on Dec. 14, 2007. U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-08-C-0082).

Roebbelen Contracting, Inc., El Dorado Hills, Calif., was awarded on Jun. 30, 2008, a $27,031,600 firm fixed price contract for construction of a multi-story general instruction building. Work will be performed in
Monterey County, Calif., and is expected to be completed by Jul. 23, 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Web bids were solicited on Mar. 3, 2008, and four bids were received. U.S. Army Engineer District, Sacramento, Calif., is the contracting activity (W91238-08-C-0010).

Comstock Construction, Inc., Wahpeton, N.D., was awarded on Jun. 27, 2008, a $16,672,700 firm fixed price contract for construction of a dormitory. Work will be performed in Minot
Air Force Base, N.D., and is expected to be completed by Jan. 4, 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Web bids were solicited on Jan. 23, 2008, and four bids were received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha, Neb., is the contracting activity (W9128F-08-C-0011).

Bristol Design Build Services, LLC, Anchorage, Ala., was awarded on Jun. 30, 2008, a $12,677,928 firm fixed price contract for construction of the
Army Growth Complex 2 – a standard small tactical maintenance shop and a standard medium tactical equipment maintenance shop. Work will be performed at Fort Lewis, Wash., and is expected to be completed by Dec. 26, 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Six bids were solicited on Sept. 27, 2007, and four bids were received. U.S. Army Engineer District, Savannah, Ga., is the contracting activity (W912HN-08-D-0027).

Peregrine Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Tustin, Calif., was awarded on Jun. 30, 2008, a $22,336,307 cost plus fixed fee contract for research on anti-phosphatidylserine antibodies. Work will be performed in locations across the nation, as well as the United Kingdom, and is expected to be completed by Jun. 29, 2013. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Web bids were solicited on Dec. 1, 2006, and 50 bids were received. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Fort Belvoir, Va., is the contracting activity (HDTRA1-08-C-0003).

Dawson Environet JV LLC, Honolulu, Hawaii was awarded on Jun. 27, 2008, a $9,467,466 firm fixed price contract for commercial environmental remediation service, munitions and explosives of concern removal action. Work will be performed at the former Waikoloa area, Waimea, Big Island, Hawaii, and is expected to be completed by Aug. 16, 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Web bids were solicited on Apr. 24, 2008, and one bid was received. U.S.
Army Engineer District, Fort Shafter, Hawaii, is the contracting activity (W9128A-08-C-0012).

Lockheed Martin Systems Integration, Owego, N.Y., was awarded on Jun. 30, 2008, a $6,569, 712 cost plus fixed fee contract for redesign of the light armored vehicle and command and control upgrade configuration. Work will be performed in Owego, N.Y., and is expected to be completed by Sept. 30, 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. One bid was solicited on Feb. 20, 2008. U.S.
Army TACOM, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (WHZV-05-C-0383).

Better Built Construction Services, Inc., Middletown, Ohio, was awarded on Jun. 30, 2008, a $6,103,006 firm fixed price contract for infrastructure upgrades to gates 22 and 24. Work will be performed at Aberdeen, Md., and is expected to be completed by Jul. 15, 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Forty-one bids were solicited and 11 were received. U.S.
Army Engineer District, Philadelphia, Pa., is the contracting activity (W912BU-08-C-0026).

USSOCOM

AeroVironment, Inc., has been awarded a Not to Exceed $200,000,000.00, one year (four option year periods), indefinite delivery indefinite quantity contract for all environment capable variant small unmanned aircraft systems in support of the U.S. Special Operations Command Program Executive Office – Fixed Wing. The work will be performed in
Simi Valley, Calif., and is for one year from date of contract award. This contract was awarded through full and open competition. This contract number is H92222-08-D-0048.

NAVY

Force Protection Industries, Inc., Ladson, S.C., is being awarded a $43,028,803 modification to previously awarded contract (M67854-07-D-5031 Delivery Order 0006) for the purchase of Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicle Integrated Logistic Support sustainment parts, Training Equipment, Training Material, Tool Sets, Outside the Continental United States Instructors and Field Service Representatives. Work will be performed in Ladson, S.C., and in the OIF/OEF Area's of responsibilities, and work is expected to be completed Dec. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The
Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity.

General Electric Aviation, Lynn, Mass., is being awarded a $30,750,000 three month extension of a previously awarded requirements contract (N00383-03-D-011M) for repair or replacement components and program support for the F404 engine used on the F/A-18 A-D aircraft. This award combines an effort between the U.S.
Navy (90 percent) and the Governments of Spain (1 percent); Canada (1 percent); Australia (1 percent); Kuwait (1 percent); and Switzerland (1 percent) under the Foreign Military Sales Program. Work will be performed in Jacksonville, Fla., (90 percent) and Lynn, Mass., (10 percent), and work is expected to be completed by Sep. 2008. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Inventory Control Point is the contracting activity.

Bath Iron Works Corp., (a General Dynamics Company), Bath, Maine is being awarded a $20,753,902 modification under previously awarded contract (N00024-06-C-2307) to exercise an option for 233,426 man-hours for Lead Yard Class Services for the DDG 51 Class AEGIS Destroyer Program. This work will provide technical assistance to the Follow Yard in the interpretation and application of the detailed design developed by BIW Corp., the Lead Yard contractor. DDG 51 Class services include: liaison for follow ship construction, general class services, class logistic services, class design agent services and class change design services for follow ships. Work will be performed in Bath, Maine, and is expected to be completed by Jul. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington
Navy Yard, D.C., is the contracting activity.

The W. F. Magann Corp., Portsmouth, Va., was awarded a $12,760,000 firm fixed price contract on Jun 30, 2008, for repairs to Berth 20 wharf structure at Norfolk Naval Shipyard to safely support anticipated loads due to waterfront activities. Work will be performed in Portsmouth, Va., and is expected to be completed by Jun. 2010. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the
Navy Electronic Commerce Online website with three proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (N40085-08-C-9683).

The Kollmorgen Corp., Northampton, Mass. is being awarded an $8,883,526 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-05-C-4310) for 4 MK 20 Electro-Optical Sensor Systems (EOSS) for the Navy's CG 47 Class Cruiser Modernization Program (CMP), 2 EOSS's for the U.S.
Coast Guard WMSL 750 Class Cutters, and 1 EOSS for the Surface Warfare Engineering Facility at NSWC Port Hueneme, Calif. The MK 20 Electro-Optical Sensor System (EOSS) is an element of the MK 34 Gun Weapon System. The EOSS interfaces with the MK 160 Mod 11 Gun Computer System and is operated from a Gun Weapon System Q-70 Control & Display Console to perform safety checksighting of gunnery fire, to aid with identification of surface/air contacts, and to provide quality track data for surface gun engagements. Work will be performed in Northampton, Mass., and is expected to be completed in Jun. 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, D.C. is the contracting activity.

Northrop Grumman Sperry Marine, Charlottesville, Va., is being awarded a $6,998,383 firm fixed price contract for three Integrated Bridge and Navigation System (IBN) shipsets for the DDG-51 modernization efforts. The IBNS is a Hull, Mechanical and Electrical (HM&E) upgrade and part of a comprehensive plan to modernize the DDG-51 Class to ensure the ships remain combat relevant and affordable throughout their life. The focus of the IBNS upgrade is to automate many manual functions to reduce manning levels and watch stander requirements. This contract includes options and engineering services which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $34,539,279. Work will be performed in Charlottesville, Va., and is expected to be completed by Dec. 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract wascompetitively procured via Federal Business Opportunities, with two offers received. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington
Navy Yard, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00024-08-C-4215).

Terex Corp., Stafford, Va., is being awarded a $6,503,949 modification to a previously awarded firm fixed priced contract (N68335-06-C-0459) to exercise an option for 20 heavy maintenance crane production units, to include Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) Analysis for each of the units in support of the AV-8, C-130, CH-53, V-22, E-6, P-3 and H-46 aircrafts. Work will be performed in Waverly, Iowa, and is expected to be completed in September 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, N.J. is the contracting activity.

TEC, Inc., Charlottesville, Va., is being awarded a $6,449,487 firm fixed price, indefinite-quantity contract for environmental planning and engineering services for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Executive Order (EO) 12114, Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions. This contract contains options which if exercised would bring the contract to a not-to-exceed value of $10,000,000. Work will be performed in the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Mid-Atlantic area of responsibility Northeast Region including, but not limited to, N.C., (45 percent); Maine, (15 percent); Va., (10 percent); N.H., (5 percent); Conn., (5 percent); N.Y., (5 percent); N.J., (5 percent); Mass., (2 percent); Pa., (2 percent); R.I., (2); Del. (2 percent); and Vt., (2 percent). Tasks could also be assigned anywhere in the Continental U. S. The term of this contract is not to exceed 60 months, with an expected completion date of Jun. 2009 (Jun. 2013 with options exercised). Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The contract was competitively procured via the NAVFAC e-solicitation website with 12 proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (N40085-08-D-1403).

Burns & Roe Services Corp., Virginia Beach, Va., was awarded a $5,571,729 modification on Jun. 30, 2008, under a previously awarded firm fixed price, indefinite-quantity contract (N62470-06-D-4614) to exercise Option 2 for utilities and maintenance services at U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. After exercise of this option, the total cumulative contract amount will be $28,407,003. This contract contains seven additional one-year option periods which if exercised, will bring the total contract value to a not to exceed amount of $66,915,462. Work will be performed at U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and is expected to be completed by Jun. 2009. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Facilities Engineering and Acquisition Division, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba is the contracting activity.

Correction: Contract awarded Jun. 30, 2008, to Harry Pepper & Associates, Inc.,
Jacksonville, Fla., (N69450-08-C-0759) for $13,985,658 should have stated that the expected completion date is Jan. 2010.

AIR FORCE

The
Air Force is modifying a firm fixed price contract with Raytheon Co., Missile Systems of Tucson, Ariz., for $87,604,532. This action will provide 130 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missiles (AMRAAM) Foreign Military Sales Air Intercept Missile 120-C7s- Greece and six Non-Developmental Item Airborne Instrumentation Units (NDI-AIUs) – Germany. This effort support foreign military sales to Greece and Germany. This action is a modification to the AMRAAM Production Lot 21 contract. At this time all funds have been obligated. 695 ARSS, Eglin AFB, Fla., is the contracting activity (FA8675-07-C-0055 P00011).

Signal Engineering Inc. of
San Diego, Calif., is being awarded a firm fixed price contract for an estimated $17,596,323. This action provides for personnel locator beacons: 36 each Configuration A, and 18 each Configuration B. The Optional CLINs to be awarded on a case-by-case basis. At this time $615,200 has been obligated. 77 AESG/PSK, Brooks City-Base, Texas, is the contracting activity (FA8902-08-C-1003).

The
Air Force is modifying a cost plus fixed fee contract with Raytheon Co. of Tucson, Ariz., for $13,186,604. The Processort Replacement Program, Phase I, begins the effort to replace data processor module common to the AMRAAM and Standard Missile 6 (SM-6). Two microelectronics parts, the AMRAAM Data Processor (ADP) and the Input-Output (IO) application specific integrated circutes (ASIC), in the guidance section electronics are no longer manufactured. The purpose of the Processor Replacement Program is to replace these obsolete parts within the guidance section data Processor module and modify the supporting missile hardware and software architecture as required to continue production of the AMRAAM and SM-6. This effort supports foreign military sales to Greece and Taiwan. At this time all funds have been obligated. 695 ARSS, Eglin AFB, Fla., is the contracting activity (FA8675-07-C-0055, P00012).

The
Air Force is modifying a firm fixed price, cost plus fixed fee contract with Lockheed Martin Systems Integration of Owego, N.Y. for $8,806,875. This contract action will provide Preprocessor Avionics Control Unit Replacement Computer Production for the AN/ALQ-161A System. At this time all fund have been obligated. 542 CBSG/PKS, Robins AFB, Ga., is the contracting activity (FA8523-07-C-0007-P00001).

Program Gives Senior Officials 21st Century Skill Sets

By Army Staff Sgt. Michael J. Carden
American Forces Press Service

July 1, 2008 - A new Defense Department program for senior-level civilians seeks to develop the skills and competencies needed to lead the 21st century national defense effort. The Defense Senior
Leader Development Program, which replaces the current Defense Leadership and Management Program, is the new "premiere executive development program for senior defense civilians and a key component of the department's succession planning strategy," said Patricia Bradshaw, deputy undersecretary of defense for civilian personnel policy.

"Civilians are playing a much greater role alongside our warfighters," she said. "Today, they are on the front lines, and civilians, including [Defense Department] civilians, have a role in reconstruction phases as well as other areas on today's battlefield."

The new program targets already-successful senior
leaders needing to strengthen their knowledge of national security and broaden their enterprise view, Bradshaw said. Experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as Hurricane Katrina, shown the need for senior-level training to evolve beyond the Defense Department into the multinational and interagency world of the State Department, nongovernmental organizations and country allies, Bradshaw said.

As the U.S. aids the Iraqi government, for example, civilian teams from the U.S. Defense and State departments are working alongside
military personnel assisting in rebuilding Iraq's ministries. Civilians are advising Iraqi officials on areas ranging from rule of law and economics to government and education, she said.

"Civilians are called upon to serve in ways we have not in the past," she said. "So it's not only the basic competencies we need to focus on; it's the ability to lead in our environment and make decisions."

Efforts such as the new training program will give senior civilians the tools they need to be successful in environments such as Iraq, Bradshaw said.

The need for the new program was recognized in 2005, and it was approved in 2007. Nominations for the first class, which begins in February, are due in September, and up to 50 people will be selected by December, said David A. Rude, chief of senior
leader development, Civilian Personnel Management Service.

Individuals participating in DLAMP all received a letter last year explaining that the program would end in fiscal 2010. They must complete all program requirements to apply for completion, Rude said.

Graduates from the previous program aren't eligible for the new one; however, supplementary courses, training and seminars are available to help them, as well as those who don't get into the new program, become more competitive, Bradshaw said. Eventually, department employees will be able to go online and see what kind of
leadership seminars and courses are available and how they map to a particular leadership competency, she added.

Those selected for the new program can expect four weeklong seminars, participation in case studies and 10 months of
military education at one of the five war colleges to give them a broader sense of national security and working side by side with servicemembers, Bradshaw said.

Each service component will implement its own process requirements for how individuals are nominated. Basic eligibility requirements for the two-year program are:

-- Permanent, full-time Defense Department civilian employee at National Security Personnel System Pay Band 3, or GS-14/15 and equivalent;

--
Bachelor's degree as required to attend professional military education at one of the five service war colleges; and

-- One year of supervisory experience, which may be waived upon component recommendation.

An hourlong town hall meeting about the new program will be held at the Pentagon Conference Center at 8:30 a.m. July 8. The meeting will stream on the Civilian Personnel Management Service Web site for those who cannot attend in person.

Navy Names New Amphibious Assault Ship America

The Navy's newest class of large-deck amphibious assault ship, LHA 6, will bear the name USS America, Secretary of the Navy Donald C. Winter announced while speaking at the USS America Carrier Veterans Association reunion in Jacksonville, Fla.

This ship will inherit a proud tradition, explained Winter. From the American Revolution through the first Gulf War, three warships have sailed with the name America.

"To serve in a ship named after our country adds to the pride one feels in being part of the
Navy, and adds to the feeling that when America pulls into port, there is no more powerful symbol of the power, the ideals, and the greatness of the United States of America," said Winter.

LHA 6 will be the fourth U.S. Navy ship to bear the name America. The first America, a 74-gun ship-of-the-line, was the first built for use by the Continental Navy. However, before having a chance to serve the fledgling U.S.
Navy, the ship was presented as a gift to the king of France to show appreciation for his country's service to the new nation. The second USS America (ID-3006) was later the name given to a troop transport used during World War I. The third was a Kitty-Hawk class aircraft carrier (CV 66) in commission from 1965 to 1996. Among other notable accomplishments, the carrier America made three deployments to Vietnam and launched air strikes on Iraq during the opening days of Operation Desert Storm.

The newest America will provide presence and power projection as an integral part of joint and multinational maritime expeditionary forces. The ship will support Marine Corps aviation requirements across a wide spectrum of operations, from small-scale contingency operations as the centerpiece of a forward-deployed expeditionary strike group, to forcible entry missions in a major theater war.

LHA 6 will replace the aging Tarawa-class and represents a conscious decision to increase the aviation capacity of future big deck amphibious ships in order to maximize the
Navy's investment in future aircraft.

LHA 6 will have an extended hangar deck with two higher hangar bay areas, each fitted with an overhead crane for aircraft maintenance. LHA 6 will also provide increased aviation fuel capacity, stowage for aviation parts and support equipment. LHA 6 will be able to embark and launch the MV-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, cargo and attack helicopters, the AV-8B Harrier and the short take-off vertical landing (STOVL) variant F-35B Lightning II Strike Fighter.

Winter explained the importance of the new America-class amphibious assault ship and the tremendous capability she will bring to the fleet.

"USS America is a wise investment in our nation's
security," Winter said, "It will be a ship worthy of her illustrious namesake, and it will continue America's long tradition of peace through strength."

Winter also announced that the sponsor of the ship will be Lynne Pace, wife of former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Peter Pace.

America is currently under contract at Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding in Pascagoula, Miss., and is expected to be delivered to the
Navy in 2012.

For more information on amphibious assault ships, visit http://www.navy.mil/navydata/fact_display.asp?cid=4200&tid=400&ct=4 .