Military News

Friday, August 06, 2010

VA obligates $1.8 billion to help veterans

WASHINGTON (AFRNS) -- The Department of Veterans Affairs committed the last of its $1.8 billion in Recovery Act funds July 31, one of the first federal agencies to achieve that milestone. Projects at more than 1,200 sites in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico will increase access to health care and services to veterans, while creating jobs and stimulating the economy.

"Veterans across the nation are benefiting from these Recovery Act funds," said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki. "Recovery Act projects are improving medical care, speeding claims processing, enhancing our national cemeteries, advancing our energy efficiency, and generating jobs for Americans."

VA rapidly put American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding to work to improve its medical facilities, revitalize its national cemeteries, hire claims processors, upgrade technology systems and assist states in acquiring, building or remodeling state nursing homes and domiciliary facilities for veterans.

Using Recovery Act funds, VA entered into 1,521 contracts with 696 contractors. Three-quarters of the contractors are veteran-owned businesses, either service-disabled veteran-owned businesses or veteran-owned small businesses.

Health Care Services Enhanced

VA obligated $1 billion to improve VA medical care facilities across the country through building renovations, roadway and walkway repairs, and high-cost equipment replacement. Other upgrades include security improvements, new construction, replacement of steam lines and boiler plants, upgrades in emergency power distribution, and purchases of additional emergency generators among others.

To help veterans access care, Recovery Act projects in VA medical facilities will add or improve more than 26,000 parking spaces, and 39 elevator banks are being built or upgraded. VA will upgrade nearly 14,000 inpatient bed spaces, while 16 pharmacy renovation projects will help veterans get medicines quicker and more efficiently. More than 14,400 clinical improvement projects, some with multiple exam rooms, will be undertaken.

Funds are also helping ensure VA health care facilities function more efficiently (by reducing annual recurring maintenance and upkeep cost) and are equipped to provide world-class care to veterans.

Specific projects include:

-- Bedford, Mass., VA Medical Center mental health unit renovation, $7.165 million;

-- Philadelphia VAMC emergency room renovations, $4.74 million;

-- Cleveland VAMC surgical suite refurbishment, $8.5 million;

-- New Haven, Conn., VAMC private and semi-private inpatient units, $7.743 million;

-- Hines, Ill., VAMC electrical distribution infrastructure upgrade, $8 million.

VA serves 5.5 million veterans annually in its hospitals, outpatient clinics and rural health programs.

Energy Conservation

VA is promoting energy conservation and reducing its environmental footprint by investing $200 million in Recovery Act funds for renewable energy generation technologies, metering systems, and energy conservation and water-saving measures. In total, the renewable energy systems awarded represent more than 9 megawatts of planned power generating capacity from solar, wind, and cogeneration technologies.

Two national cemeteries, in Bourne, Mass., and San Joaquin, Calif., anticipate producing enough electricity to supply nearly all of their energy needs.

VA is installing solar photovoltaic systems at facilities in Albuquerque, N.M.; Tucson, Ariz.; Dublin, Ga.; Calverton, N.Y.; San Joaquin, Calif., and Riverside, Calif.

VA is erecting a wind turbine in Bourne, Mass., and is constructing a geothermal system at its medical center in St. Cloud, Minn.

In addition, VA is building renewably fueled cogeneration systems at five medical facilities: Togus, Maine; White River Junction, Vt.; Chillicothe, Ohio; Loma Linda, Calif.; and Canandaigua, N.Y.

VA is installing metering systems at all VA-owned facilities to monitor energy utilities, including electricity, water, chilled water, steam, and natural gas consumption.

VA is also investing $197 million in energy and water infrastructure improvements. VA facilities across the country are upgrading their facilities to reduce energy consumption and water usage and better manage related costs.

Claims Processing Improvements

VA is working to improve the systems for processing claims to more quickly and efficiently deliver benefits to veterans. VA has obligated $150 million to hire, train and equip new employees to improve claims processing and speed the delivery of benefits to veterans. VA has hired approximately 2,700 temporary and permanent employees to assist with processing veterans' claims for VA benefits.

National Cemeteries Revitalized

Throughout VA's system of 131 national cemeteries, 391 improvement projects are underway using $50 million in Recovery Act funding. VA is restoring and preserving 49 historic monuments and memorials, becoming more energy efficient by investing in renewable energy sources (solar and wind), moving forward on nine energy conservation projects, and improving access and visitor safety with 49 road, paving and grounds improvement projects.

Recovery Act funds are also being used to raise, realign, and clean approximately 200,000 headstones and markers, repair sunken graves, and renovate turf at 22 VA national cemeteries.

One-time Benefit Payments

The Recovery Act provided one-time $250 economic recovery payments to eligible veterans, their survivors, and dependents to help mitigate the effects of the current economy. Although $7.1 million were intended for administrative support of the one-time benefit payments, VA was able to successfully administer the program with a savings of approximately $6.1 million, and may return the remaining funds to the U.S. Treasury. (Courtesy of VA News)

okosuka Sailors Prepare for Future with Career Counselor Symposium

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Andrew Ryan Smith, Navy Public Affairs Support Element West, Det. Japan

YOKOSUKA, Japan (NNS) -- Sailors at Commander Fleet Activities Yokosuka (CFAY) attended the Career Counselor Symposium to better prepare themselves and those they advise for the competitive environment of the modern Navy Aug. 5-6 in Yokosuka, Japan.

More than 75 Sailors from commands throughout Naval Region Japan attended the mini-conference, which covered force shaping tools, detailing, career development tools and education opportunities.

"Events like this are important for getting career information out to our Sailors, so they have the most current information available to them," said CFAY Command Master Chief Gregory Vidaurri.

Many of the symposium attendees were not rated Navy counselors, but command appointed collateral duty counselors who work to help out fellow Sailors by answering their career-related questions and in some cases, pointing them in the right direction.

"A lot of junior Sailors do not take the time to take their career in their own hands because of all the work and knowledge required to do so; that is why career counselors are so important," said Fire Controlman 2nd Class Foushee Roosevelt, a divisional counselor assigned to USS Shiloh (CG 67). "The presentation today gave me a better perspective of what should go on an evaluation. They broke everything down and laid out what you need for success."

The objective of presenters was to educate Sailors about career options and the benefits of staying active duty.

"The Navy is always changing and in order to keep up with these changes, Sailors need to be aware of new regulations and different programs that are available that could effect their careers. This symposium is going to help drive them in the right direction," said Vidaurri.

U.S. Continues Aid to Pakistan Flood Victims

By Elaine Wilson
American Forces Press Service

Aug. 6, 2010 - The United States is continuing to aid flood victims in Pakistan while working with the Pakistani government to see if additional U.S. military support is required, Pentagon Press Secretary Geoff Morrell said yesterday.

U.S. officials also are looking into the need to begin posturing forces to help, Morrell said.

The floods in the northwestern part of the nation have killed more than 1,500 people so far, he said. The floods, caused by heavy monsoon rains, have affected an estimated 1.5 million people, and the rain continues in the region.

Six U.S. helicopters – including four Army CH-47 Chinooks and two Army UH-60 Black Hawks -- are in Pakistan supporting relief operations, Morrell said. As of today, the aircraft have flown 18 sorties, he said, and evacuated about 800 people from flood-affected areas. They also have transported 66,000 pounds of relief supplies, he added, and, as of yesterday, delivered nearly 440,000packaged meals that conform with Muslim law.

Meanwhile, the Defense Department is ensuring it strikes a balance between the needs of Pakistan and operations in Afghanistan. The U.S. assets that have been deployed there have been taken from Afghanistan, Morrell explained.

"We can do that for some period of time, but ultimately they are required in the theater of combat," he said. However, the United States will go to "extraordinary measures" to help the flood victims, he added.

"We are looking at how to ... meet the demand in Pakistan without adversely impacting operations in Afghanistan," he said. "We will find a way if we are needed to balance both needs."

Alaska Guard prepares for training in Mongolia

(8/5/10) -- Alaska National Guard Soldiers are currently preparing for Khaan Quest 2010, a multinational training exercise at the Five Hills Training Area, Tavan Tolgoi, outside the city of Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. The exercise is scheduled to kick off with an opening ceremony Aug. 8 and conclude Aug. 29.

Guardsmen from the Alaska Army National Guard's 38th Troop Command and individuals from the Alaska Air National Guard's 176th Medical Group will depart this week to join 220 members of the Mongolian Armed Forces and 60 members of the U.S. military.

"One of the biggest benefits for Alaska Soldiers participating in this exercise is the opportunity to experience and interact with a multitude of soldiers from different countries," said Command Sgt. Maj. Pamela Harrington, senior leader observer for the Alaska National Guard. "Our Soldiers participating in this exercise will also be able to break the language and culture barrier."

The exercise is co-sponsored by the Mongolian Armed Forces and the U.S.

Pacific Command.

Mongolian, multinational and U.S. forces will conduct a command post exercise, a humanitarian civic activity and medical readiness training exercise.

The purpose of Khaan Quest is to develop participating military forces' ability to contribute to UN and coalition peacekeeping operations, particularly multinational efforts involving peacekeeping challenges like insurgency, terrorism, crime and ethnic conflict. The exercise aims to cultivate the readiness and interoperability that translate success in such conflicts.

"The Khaan Quest Exercise is important because it helps build the relationship between the Mongolian Army and the Alaska Army National Guard and better prepares both elements, not only for this mission but other missions involving joint operations and military forces from various supporting nations," said Harrington.

Airman Missing in Action from WWII Identified

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

He is Sgt. John P. Bonnassiolle, U.S. Army, of Oakland, Calif. He will be buried Tuesday in San Francisco.

On April 29, 1944, he was aboard a B-24J Liberator with nine other crewmen. They failed to return following a bombing mission over Berlin. German documents captured after the war established the aircraft had crashed near the town of East Meitze, Germany, north of Hannover. German forces removed the remains of three crewmen from the site and buried them in a cemetery in Hannover.

In 1946, The U.S. Army's Graves Registration Command located the remains of the men buried in Hannover and reburied them at the U.S. Military Cemetery at Neuville-en-Condroz, Belgium, after confirming the identities of two of the three.

In 2003, a German citizen began excavating the East Meitze crash site and turned over human remains to U.S. officials. A Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command team traveled to excavate the crash site in 2005 and 2007, recovering additional remains and crew-related equipment -- including identification tags for Bonnassiolle and three other crew members.

Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA -- which matched that of Bonnassiolle's sister -- in the identification of his remains.

More than 400,000 of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II died. At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover, identify and bury approximately 79,000 as known persons. Today, more than 72,000 Americans remain unaccounted-for from the conflict.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO Web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

Air Force Announces F-16 Training Mission

WASHINGTON (AFNS) - The secretary and chief of staff of the Air Force announced today the transition of Holloman Air Force Base, N.M., to the F-16 training mission.

The Air Force determined that Holloman has the capacity to accept two F-16 training squadrons and offers ability to synergize training activities with MQ-1/9 training occurring on the same base.

Transitioning Holloman to F-16 training stabilizes an enduring training mission and capitalizes on the existing airspace and range complex.

Implementation of this action is subject to completion of appropriate environmental analysis.

CNO Visits San Francisco

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Kyle P. Malloy, Chief of Naval Operations Public Affairs

SAN FRANCISCO (NNS) -- Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Gary Roughead was the keynote speaker at the World Affairs Council in San Francisco Aug. 5.

CNO spoke at the World Affairs Council of Northern California to address the U.S. Navy's global influence and the emerging security environment.

"Suffice it to say that our Navy is on every continent and in every ocean, reassuring, strengthening, developing old and new emerging partners to support the stable world order," said Roughead.

CNO went on to address how the Navy is doing its part to contribute to an ever-changing global environment with an increasing demand for naval influence both domestically and abroad.

He also spoke about how the current Navy faces much different challenges than those of the past but is able to embrace them because of the extraordinarily high standard from which it operates.

"This time is different for all of us," said Roughead. "But what is not different is the need for a Navy, and I'm very proud of what that Navy does every day in every ocean."

Roughead also visited Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif., during his trip to San Francisco and received a first hand look at different scientific and technological systems being researched in order to improve national security.

Seabees, Marines Rebuild Haitian Hospital Roof

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Bryan Weyers, Commander, U.S. 2nd Fleet Public Affairs

PORT DE PAIX, Haiti (NNS) -- Seabees and Marines deployed aboard the Continuing Promise 2010 flagship, USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), spent five days reconstructing a hospital in Port de Paix, Haiti, July 27 to 31.

Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 7, Construction

Battalion Mobile Unit (CBMU) 202 and Marine Logistical

Command Element (LCE) built a new roof on the hospital, washed and bleached all the walls and floors, painted the walls inside and outside the facility and constructed a shelter over a well behind the hospital where locals wash their clothing.

"We've been tasked to refurbish this hospital and make it a usable facility for the Haitian people," said Builder 2nd Class Thomas J. Camara, CBMU 202 project supervisor.

The medical facility is the only hospital in Port de Paix that is supported by the local government.

"The community has been really receptive to what we are doing here," said Camara. "They have actually come out to watch us work everyday."

During their lunch breaks, Seabees and Marines had the opportunity to sit and visit with the locals and enjoy a few laughs while they were in Haiti.

"This was a fulfilling mission and a beautiful province to work in," said Gunnery Sgt. George J. Fowler, from the LCE.

The Haitian government shut down the hospital one month prior to the arrival of the Seabees and Marines and moved all the patients out to another facility.

"As a joint task operation for multiple units, we've come together really well at this time to help the Haitian people and really push forward thru this project," said Camara.

USS Iwo Jima Makes GTMO Port Call

By Terence R. Peck, Naval Station Guantanamo Bay Public Affairs

GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba (NNS) -- USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) made a port visit to Naval Station Guantanamo Bay (GTMO), Cuba Aug. 4-6.

The ship made the port call to bring aboard supplies and to provide the crew a few days of rest and relaxation following its 10-day stop in Haiti.

During the two days in GTMO, the ship received 11,520 Meals-Ready-to-Eat and 140 pallets of food, including 35,000 pounds of fresh fruit and vegetables, 30,240 bottles of water, 115,000 gallons of J-5 jet fuel and 800,000 gallons of F-76 diesel.

Once the resupply was complete, Iwo Jima resumed its participation in Continue Promise 2010, providing humanitarian civic assistance throughout the Caribbean and Latin American regions.

The ship's next visit will be to Colombia.

During the four-month annual humanitarian civic assistance operation, the crew of 1,600 Sailors and Marines will provide assistance to Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Nicaragua, Panama and Suriname.

Continuing Promise is part of the Navy's Maritime Strategy, which seeks to build on relationships during times of calm and mitigating human suffering though interagency and multinational efforts.

The operation is supported by U.S. and international military medical personnel, U.S. government agencies, regional health ministries, non-governmental organizations and academic institutions.

The recent operation is the fifth conducted in the region since 2007.

After departing July 12 from their homeport of Norfolk, Iwo Jima made its first humanitarian assistance stop in the country of Haiti.

While in Haiti, Iwo Jima provided medical support, conducting approximately 25 surgeries. The surgeries included removing hernias, cataracts and cysts.

Medical doctors provided the Haitians classes on properly disposing of waste to help reduce the mosquito population and disease.

Military veterinarians provided care for animals, while engineers helped rebuild a roof on a hospital and install bathrooms in other buildings.

"I feel proud that I did something for someone else," said Air Traffic Controller 2nd Class (AW) Sherry Killough. "I'm hoping that they gain the knowledge that someone else does care and that we are doing what we can."

Deputy CNO for Fleet Readiness, Logistics Visits Training Commands

From Submarine Learning Center Public Affairs

GROTON, Conn. (NNS) -- The deputy chief of naval operations for Fleet Readiness and Logistics visited training commands in Groton, Conn., July 30 to familiarize himself with the Submarine Learning Center's capabilities and to observe the blended learning used to teach Sailors at the Naval Submarine School.

Vice Adm. William R. Burke spent the morning at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport, R.I., seeing how Sailors get hands-on training in the submarine bridge trainer engineering design module. He then spent the afternoon touring the Naval Submarine School, talking with students and instructors.

While observing students in the submarine piloting and navigation trainer, Burke asked instructor Chief Electronics Technician (Submarines) Jeremy Peterson to explain how they train Sailors in paperless navigation.

Peterson highlighted the importance of recent training improvements, including the Voyage Management System (VMS) that augments paper charts, citing enhancements in the time required for data acquisition and dissemination as well as improvements in the speed of distribution of critical information.

Burke's visit is part of an ongoing process designed to strengthen the quality of training through a variety of means, including providing Navy leadership with the opportunity to see training in action, as well as direct fleet feedback and participation in the training development process.

US Pacific Fleet Launches New Warfighting Assessment Federation

By Troy Clarke, Naval Surface Warfare Center Corona Public Affairs

NORCO, Calif. (NNS) -- U.S. Pacific Fleet Command (COMPACFLT) established, for the first time ever, a new warfighting assessment federation Aug. 3 to strengthen the Navy's analysis efforts across the warfighting assessment community.

The federation's inauguration coincided with a planning session for exercise Valiant Shield 2010 hosted Aug. 4-5 by Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Corona, and brought together Sailors and Navy civilians from the training, operational and acquisition communities.

"I wanted to bring a group of professionals from the various assessment groups to work collaboratively across organizational boundaries so all participating organizations benefit," said Dave Yoshihara, director, COMPACFLT Warfighting Assessment and Readiness. "We all see different parts of the big picture and a collaborative federation is the best way to leverage all our individual viewpoints so we can merge those perspectives into a single, integrated picture."

Yoshihara, the Pacific fleet's key official for warfighting assessment and readiness, said this group will help take gauging warfighting capability to a new level.

Yoshihara asked Corona to host the inaugural meeting since it is the Navy's warfighting assessment data analysis center, using its Joint Warfighting Assessment Lab and Daugherty Memorial Assessment Center to process, analyze and distribute performance data around the world during naval operations.

"We're honored to host this historic meeting for the Warfighting Assessment Federation," said NSWC Corona Commanding Officer Capt. Jay Kadowaki. "As the Navy's independent assessment agent, we have the right analytical talent, right assessment tools, right facilities to help the Navy gauge our warfighting capability and support the federation concept."

Yoshihara expects the federation to inform operational and strategic planning, training, doctrine and force-structure development through a data-driven process coming from wargames, modeling and simulation, synthetic and at-sea training exercises, and real-world operations, as well as the assessment of tactical and operational performance.

"The fleet will benefit from robust operational assessments, and participating organizations will gain insight from the real-world data access and exposure to current fleet challenges, and participation in operational events," said Yoshihara.

Initial membership includes Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition, Chief Systems Engineer; Center for Naval Analysis; systems commands; program offices; Surface Warfare Group; Naval Sea Systems Command warfare centers; university affiliated research centers and others.

Yoshihara expects federation membership to expand in the future to include warfare centers of excellence, the type commands, and other navy labs, and that team makeup for each event will vary depending on each participating organization's tasking, funding and availability.

The first exercise for the warfighting assessment federation will be Valiant Shield 2010, being held in late 2010, which focuses on integrated joint training among U.S. Armed Forces.

"We're eager to test the federation concept and continue developing its role to enhance our fleet's performance," said Yoshihara. "It comes down to building the right team, sharing our collective knowledge and expertise to increase capability and performance. This is uncharted territory, and we're really excited about the possibilities."

COMPACFLT, the world's largest fleet command, encompasses more than half the earth's surface, covering 100 million square miles from the West Coast of the United States into the Indian Ocean. It includes approximately 180 ships, nearly 2,000 aircraft and 125,000 Sailors, Marines and civilians, as well as type commands for surface ships, submarines and aircraft, and the operational commands of 3rd Fleet in the Eastern Pacific and 7th Fleet in the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean.

NSWC Corona is the Navy's premiere independent assessment agent and the newest federal lab responsible for gauging the warfighting capability of weapons and integrated combat systems, through assessment of systems' performance, readiness, quality, supportability and the adequacy of training. The base is home to three premiere national laboratories and assessment centers: the Joint Warfare Assessment Lab; the Measurement Science and Technology Lab; and Daugherty Memorial Assessment Center.

Army Sustainability Report Highlights Energy and Environmental Achievements

The Department of the Army announced today that it has released its second Annual Sustainability Report highlighting energy and environmental achievements and milestones supporting the Army's sustainability concept and goals.

The annual sustainability report informs primary stakeholders, partners, the American people, and other interested parties on the Army's progress to embody the principles of sustainability in its operations and installation management.

"Army leadership has come to understand the potential for sustainability to strengthen national security. What had previously yielded benefit through environmental initiatives is emerging as an important tool for countering the destabilizing effects of emerging challenges from competition over limited and diminishing resources, as well as population movements, pandemics and other climate change-related events," said Under Secretary of the Army Joseph W. Westphal, who serves as both the Army's senior sustainability official and chief management officer.

Throughout the Army, efforts are underway to further recognize sustainability as an organizing principle. Army sustainability results from aligning the Army's mission with environmental stewardship and community well being, plus the economic benefit accrued from reduced waste and increased efficiency.

Twenty-eight Army installations have undergone integrated strategic and sustainability planning which requires long-term sustainability plans and goals to meet future mission and community needs. All new Army construction since fiscal 2008 has been required to be designed to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver minimum standard. Further, efforts are underway to ensure that all new Army acquisition programs include the fully burdened cost of energy in the selection process to maximize the productivity of energy needed to meet our operational capabilities.

"The Army is currently in the midst of its eighth year of protracted conflict. With an eye toward rebalancing the force, sustainability has proven an effective tool for meeting operational requirements, while sustaining facilities and ranges, improving quality of life and reducing the burden on the natural and manmade systems on which we depend," said Gen. Peter W. Chiarelli, vice chief of staff of the Army.

Tad Davis, deputy assistant secretary of the Army for environment, safety and occupational health said, "The results we are now seeing from the Army's sustainability programs and initiatives directly support our mission and the well-being of our soldiers, civilians, families and communities."

The report and other information on Army sustainability programs and initiatives are available online to download at http://www.aepi.army.mil .

Media may contact Dave Foster, 703-697-5344 or Dave.Foster1@us.army.mil.

MILITARY CONTRACTS August 6, 2010

AIR FORCE

Raytheon Missile Systems, Tucson, Ariz., was awarded a $492,440,683 contract which will provide: 132 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM) Air Intercept Missile (AIM)-120D All-up-Round (AUR) missiles; 12 AIM-120D Air Vehicles Instrumented (AAVI); 87 AIM-120D Captive Air Training Missiles (CATM); 273 AIM-120C7 AURs for Foreign Military Sales customers; warranty for 85 AIM-120D AURs for the U.S. Air Force; warranty for 10 AAVIs for the Air Force; warranty for 87 CATMs for the Air Force and Navy; warranty for 58 AIM-120C7 AURs for Foreign Military Sales customers Chile (13) and Jordan (45); 192 non-developmental item-airborne instrumentation units; test equipment; AIM 120D guidance section and rear data link for the Air Force; HIF/Spike life time buy; and contractor logistics support. This includes foreign military sales to Morocco, Jordan, Kuwait, Turkey, Singapore, Canada, Korea, Chile, Finland, United Kingdom (44 percent). At this time, the entire amount has been obligated. AAC/EBAC, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is the contracting activity (FA8675-10-C-0014).

Booz Allen Hamilton, Herndon, Va., was awarded a $23,086,466 contract which will provide Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center analysis of ground vehicle survivability and vulnerability protection technology. At this time, $1,300,136 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., is the contracting activity (SP0700-03-D-1380; Delivery Order 360).

Booz Allen Hamilton, Herndon, Va., was awarded a $22,817,103 contract which will provide counterterrorism analysis for the U.S. Central Command Interagency Action Group. At this time, $2,562,474 has been obligated. 55 CONS/LGCD, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., is the contracting activity (SP0700-03-D-1380; Delivery Order 358).

United Technologies Corp., Pratt and Whitney , East Hartford, Conn., was awarded a $9,859,994 contract modification which will support repair, overhaul and remanufacture of stators and shrouds to support the F100-PA-100/200/220/220B engine. At this time, the entire amount has been obligated. 448 SCMG/PKBCB, Tinker Air Force Base, Okla., is the contracting activity (FA8121-10-C-0009-P00002).

ITT Systems Corp., Colorado Springs, Colo., was awarded a $7,350,628 contract modification which will provide system engineering integration and sustainment of ground-based missile warning, missile defense, and space surveillance sensors. At this time, $6,563,061 has been obligated. ESC/HSIK, Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., is the contracting activity (F19628-02-C-0010; P00260).

ARMY

IAP Worldwide Services, Panama City, Fla., was awarded on Aug. 2 a $51,196,358 firm-fixed-price contract. This purpose of this project is to design, procure, construct and commission two 10MW diesel generator power plants in Kandahar city. The two 10MW plants will be located in Kandahar city at the New Industrial Park, and Russian silo sites. Work is to be performed in Kandahar, Afghanistan, with an estimated completion date of May 27, 2011. Bids were solicited on the Web with one bid received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Afghanistan Engineering District South, Afghanistan, is the contracting activity (W5J9LE-10-C-0025).

Sikorsky Aircraft Corp., Stratford, Conn., was awarded on Aug. 3 a $35,252,210 firm-fixed-price contract for three UH-60M aircraft for the Mexico Navy and three auxiliary power units inlet barrier filter kits for the UH-60M. Work is to be performed in Stratford, Conn., with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2012. One bid was solicited with one bid received. U.S. Army Contracting Command, AMCOM Contracting Center, CCAM-GH-A, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-08-C-0003).

Armtec Defense Products Co., Coachella, Calif., was awarded on July 28 a $29,200,558 firm-fixed-price contract. The contractor shall provide 155mm M232A1 modular artillery charge systems combustible cases. Work is to be performed in Coachella, Calif., with an estimated completion date of Sept. 30, 2013. One bid was solicited with one bid received. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Joint Munitions & Lethality Contracting Center, CCJM-CA, Combat Ammo Center, Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., is the contracting activity (W15QKN-08-C-0437).

Federal Contracting, Inc., Colorado Springs, Colo., was awarded on Aug. 3 a $28,586,634 firm-fixed-price contract to design and construct "47th SOF Battalion Operations Complex, RFP No. W9128F-10-R-0010, Fort Carson, Colo." Work is to be performed in Fort Carson, Colo., with an estimated completion date of Jan. 15, 2012. Unrestricted bids were solicited with 18 bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha, Neb., is the contracting activity (W9128F-10-C-0061).

Honeywell International Aerospace, Tempe, Ariz., was awarded in July 29 a $28,129,263 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract is for "UH-60 Blackhawk Valve, Solenoid Spares, National Stock Number 4810-01-102-2473, Part Number 32138590301, Five Year Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity, Minimum Quantity 1300/Maximum Quantity 7800." Work is to be performed in Tempe, Ariz., with an estimated completion date of May 12, 2016. Two bids were solicited with one bid received. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aviation and Missile Center, CCAM-AR-A, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-10-D-0187

Cajun Construction, Baton Rouge, La., was awarded on July 29 a $26,874,844 firm-fixed-price contract for the construction of "Floodwall in Lake Pontchartrain & Vicinity, West Return Floodwall, South Segment (South of I-10), Jefferson Parish, La., (LPV 3.2A)." Work is to be performed in Jefferson Parish, La., with an estimated completion date of May 28, 2011. Bids were solicited on the Web with 10 bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans District, New Orleans, La., is the contracting activity (W912P8-10-C-0105).

Atlantic Diving Supply, Inc., Virginia Beach, Va., was awarded on July 29 a $25,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for 20,000 fire resistant environmental ensemble systems with MultiCam print. Work is to be performed in Virginia Beach, Va., with an estimated completion date of April 30, 2011. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Research Development & Engineering Command Contracting Center, Aberdeen Contracting Division, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., is the contracting activity (W912CRB-07-D-0033).

General Dynamics Armaments and Technical Products, Burlington, Vt., was awarded on July 30 a $24,851,751 firm-fixed-price, undefinitized contract action contract. This contract is for 130 each of MK47, 40MM, advanced light weight grenade launchers system with lightweight video sight, air burst barrels, and ancillary equipment with spare and repair parts. Work is to be performed in Saco, Maine, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 31, 2012. One bid was solicited with one bid received. U.S. Army TACOM Contacting Center, CCTA-AR-VB, Rock Island, Ill., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-10-C-0408).

AM General, LLC, South Bend, Ind., was awarded in Aug. 3 a $20,549,874 firm-fixed-price contract. The purpose of the contract is to purchase 22 armored personnel troop carriers. Work is to be performed in Mishawaka, Ind., with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2010. One bid was solicited with one bid received. TACOM, Warren, CCTA-ATA-A, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (DAAE07-01-C-S001).

Versar, Inc., Springfield, Va., was awarded on Aug. 3 a $17,107,957 firm-fixed-price contract for electrical repairs and inspection in various locations throughout Iraq. Work is to be performed in Iraq, with an estimated completion date of June 3, 2012. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with six bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Transatlantic Programs Center, CETAC-CT-U, Winchester, Va., is the contracting activity (W912ER-10-C-0042).

Camber Corp., Huntsville, Ala., was awarded on July 29 a $16,631,058 firm-fixed-price contract. This procurement is for the acquisition of services to update Army technical manuals. Work is to be performed in Huntsville, Ala., with an estimated completion date of July 31, 2011. Three bids were solicited with two bids received. TACOM, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-06-A-0004).

Thales Raytheon Systems, LLC, Fullerton, Calif., was awarded on Aug. 4 a $15,616,857 firm-fixed-price contract. The U.S. government intends to procure mini-depot capability for the government of India for the sustainment of the FireFinder AN/TPQ-37A(v)3 radar set. Work is to be performed in Fullerton, Calif. (34 percent), and El Segundo, Calif. (66 percent), with an estimated completion date of Aug. 1, 2015. One sole-source bid was solicited with one bid received. CECOM Acquisition Center, Fort Monmouth, N.J., is the contracting activity (W15P7T-06-D-T001).

Suffolk Construction Co., Inc., Sarasota, Fla., was awarded on Aug. 4 a $14,927,000 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract is to design and construct the new Irwin Intermediate School, Fort Bragg, N.C. The purpose of the project is to construct a new intermediate school to serve 725 students, grades five and six. The school will be reinforced concrete and/or steel framing and will include general purpose classrooms; area classroom; music classroom; computer lab; gymnasium; multi-purpose room with stage and kitchen; specialist rooms; information center; administrative offices; teacher workrooms,; and supply/storage rooms. The school will incorporate advanced communication systems to support technology programs requirements, as well as general communications. The project scope will also include utilities; parking; bus loading/unloading area; playground; sports facilities; signage; fencing; landscaping; and security lighting. Work is to be performed in Fort Bragg, N.C., with an estimated completion date of Nov. 28, 2011. Bids were solicited on the Web with 17 bids received. U.S. Army Engineering District, Savannah, Ga., is the contracting activity (W912HN-10-C-0053).

DRS Defense Solutions, LLC, Bethesda, Md., was awarded on July 30 a $12,827,997 firm-fixed-price contract to perform information technology support services for U.S. forces located on Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. Work is to be performed in Afghanistan, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 14, 2012. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with seven bids received. Bagram Regional Contracting Center, Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, is the contracting activity (W91B4N-10-C-5017).

BAE Systems National Security Solutions, Inc., San Diego, Calif., was awarded on July 30 a $12,642,384 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, firm-fixed-price contract. This contract is for a Global Geospatial Intelligence date products in support of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. Work is to be performed in Mount Laurel, N.J. (50 percent); McLean, Va. (2 percent); Huntsville, Ala. (24 percent); Mission, Kan. (12 percent); and Bowie, Md. (12 percent), with an estimated completion date of July 29, 2011. One bid was solicited with one bid received. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, AMSM, St. Louis, Mo., is the contracting activity (NMA302-03-D-0004).

Bristol Design Build Services, LLC, Anchorage, Alaska, was awarded on July 30 a $12,151,093 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract is for "the design/build FY10 Project Number 72665 Theater High Altitude Air Defense Battery I Project, D/B PN69307 Petroleum, Oil and Lubricants Truck Company Unit Maintenance Facilities, main Cantonment, Company Operations Facility, Fort Bliss, Texas." Work is to be performed in Fort Bliss, Texas, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 15, 2011. Four bids were solicited with two bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Albuquerque District, CESPA-CT, Albuquerque, N.M., is the contracting activity (W912HN-08-D-0025).

Alessi-Keyes Construction, Little Rock, Ark., was awarded on July 28 a $11,008,931 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract will be a firm-price contract, 100-percent Small Business Set-Aside competition. Selection of the successful contractor is based on the "Low-Priced, Technical Acceptable, IAW FAR 15.101-2," using evaluation criteria that was established in the request for proposal. A design-bid-build contract will be awarded for the construction of the security forces operations facilities at Little Rock Air Force Base in Pulaski County, Ark. The facility shall provide adequate space for administration; mobility storage; control center; emergency response; armory; detention; equipment lockers; and training, as well as other spaces. This contract shall include all management, supervision, labor, material and equipment necessary to provide a complete and functional facility; and provide all site improvements and utilities necessary to support the new building facility. The contract shall include construction of the primary facility as well as site work, including: site utilities; parking; service drive; staging yard; site grading and drainage; sidewalks; curbs; gutters; demolition; landscaping; anti-terrorism and force protection measures; fencing; and outdoor activity areas. The "NACIS" code is "236220/$33.5 M"; the "Standard Industrial Classification" code for this procurement is "Subsector 236, Construction of Buildings." The small business size standard is $33,500,000. Work is to be performed in Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark., with an estimated completion date of Aug. 26, 2010. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with four bids received. U.S. Army Engineer District, Little Rock, Ark., is the contracting activity (W9127S-10-C-6013).

Science Applications International Corp., Huntsville, Ala., was awarded on July 28 a $10,843,432 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract is to procure rapid deployment integrated systems, combat outpost surveillance, and force protection systems to provide early warning force protection. Work is to be performed in Huntsville, Ala. (53.72 percent); Stillwater, Okla. (34.57 percent); and Arab, Ala. (11.71 percent), with an estimated completion date of Jan. 25, 2010. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with two bids received. U.S. Army Research Development & Engineering Command-Contracting Center, Natick Contracting Division, Natick Contracting Division, Orlando, Fla., is the contracting activity (W911QY-10-F-0188).

GM GDLS Defense Group, LLC, Sterling Heights, Mich., was awarded on July 30 a $9,817,799 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract action revises the obligated amount for the production cut-in of the revised Stryker performance specifications - which incorporated a modified hull design - into 281 vehicles. The Double-V hull is an integrated solution that provides improved protection levels to support operations in the Operation Enduring Freedom area of responsibility. Work is to be performed in Sterling Heights, Mich. (30 percent), and London, Canada (70 percent), with an estimated completion date of Feb. 16, 2012. One bid was solicited with one bid received. TACOM, CCTA-AIP, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-07-D-M112).

World Technical Services, Inc., Anchorage, Alaska, was awarded on July 22 a $9,542,253 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for logistics support services. Work is to be performed in Fort Sill, Okla., with an estimated completion date of Nov. 30, 2010. One sole-source bid was solicited with one bid received. Mission and Installation Contracting Command, Fort Sill, Okla., is the contracting activity (W9124L-10-C-0004).

Cheoah Construction Co., Inc., Robbinsville, N.C., was awarded on Aug. 3 a $9,201,295 firm-fixed-price contract. This project is for the repair of approximately 25 miles of gravel tank trails and approximately three miles of asphalt roads for the Fort Benning tank trail system. The project requires supporting facilities to include pavement markings; clearing and grubbing; borrow materials; storm water system; seeding and sodding; and erosion control measures. Work is to be performed in Fort Benning, Ga., with an estimated completion date of Sept. 1, 2011. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with three bids received. U.S. Army Engineer District, Savannah, Ga., is the contracting activity (W912HN-10-C-0046).

Eagle Applied Science, LLC, San Antonio, Texas, was awarded on July 29 a $8,954,490 time-and-material contract. This contract is for the Army Warrior in Transition program and Soldier Transfer and Regulation Tracking Center program, non-personal services by contract services providers to assist soldiers and their families with medical, travel and any other issue. Work is to be performed in various U.S. cities with an estimated completion date of Aug. 7, 2011. One bid was solicited with one bid received. U.S. Army Medical Command, Center for Health Care Contracting, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, is the contracting activity (W81K04-07-D-0018).

Service Source, Alexandria, Va., was awarded on July 29 an $8,647,391 firm-fixed-price indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract. This contract is to provide a facility attendant service at Fort Carson, Colo. Work is to be performed in Fort Carson, Colo., with an estimated completion date of July 31, 2011. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Directorate of Contracting, Fort Carson, Colo., is the contracting activity (W911RZ-10-D-0005).

Security Signals, Cordova, Tenn., was awarded on July 29 a $8,542,858 firm-fixed-price supply contract. The item to be procured is the A/P-25S-5B personnel distress kit for use by the Air Force, Army and Foreign Military Sales. Base quantity to be awarded is 97,200. Work is to be performed in Cordova, Tenn., with an estimated completion date of July 31, 2016. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with one bid received. Army Contracting Center, Rock Island Contracting Command, Rock Island., Ill., is the contracting activity (W52P1J-10-D-0065).

Infinite-Wyatt, Coosada, Ala., was awarded on Aug. 3 a $8,411,005 firm-fixed-price contract for the construction of a chapel complex located at Fort Campbell, Ky. Work is to be performed in Fort Campbell, Ky., with an estimated completion date of Jan. 3, 2012. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with eight bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville District, Louisville, Ky., is the contracting activity (W912QR-10-C-0068).

BAE Systems National Security Solutions, Inc., San Diego, Calif., was awarded on July 29 a $8,392,718 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract is for the subject matter expert services for "National Ground Intelligence Center NGA Support Team, The Office of Counter proliferation, The Office of Counterterrorism, and The Office of Asia Pacific" . Work is to be performed in Bethesda, Md. (14 percent); the District of Columbia (34 percent); St. Louis, Mo. (29 percent); and Charlottesville, Va., (23 percent), with an estimated completion date of Sept. 15, 2011. One bid was solicited with one bid received. National Geospatial Intelligence Agency, Arnold, Mo., is the contracting activity (NMA302-03-D-0004).

Andritz Hydro Corp., Charlotte, N.C., was awarded on July 30 a $8,296,516 fixed-price contract. The "Lower Monumental, Little Goose, and Lower Granite Exciter Replacement" is for the replacement of the excitation systems at Lower Monumental, Little Goose, and Lower Granite dams. Work is to be performed in Kahlotus, Wash. (50 percent); Pomeroy, Wash. (25.29 percent); and Dayton, Wash. (24.71 percent), with an estimated completion date of Feb. 28, 2013. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with seven bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, Walla Walla, Wash., is the contracting activity (W912EF-10-C-0037).

Night Optics USA, Inc., Huntington Beach, Calif., was awarded on Aug. 3 an $8,226,325 firm-fixed-price contract. The U.S. government is procuring the following: 110 Night Optics/Binocular Night Vision Device-15 (NO/BNVD-15) night vision goggles; 136 Night Optics/Passive Vision-14 (NO/PV-14) advanced multi-purpose scopes; 100 of NO/PVS-14-3w/5x; three NO/BNVD-15 purge adaptors; 145 Passive Vision Sigh-14 (PVS-14) maintenance spares kits; operator spares; and training for the NO/BNVD-15. Work is to be performed in Huntington Beach, Calif., with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2019. One bid was solicited with one bid received. CECOM Contracting Center, Fort Monmouth, N.J., is the contracting activity (W15P7T-10-P-D239).

Key Construction, Wichita, Kan., was awarded on Aug. 4 an $8,222,900 firm-fixed-price contract. It is a construction remodeling project of Buildings 37 and 49 for the 184th Intelligence Wing, Air National Guard, McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. Work is to be performed in Wichita, Kan., with an estimated completion date of Aug. 2, 2011. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with 10 bids received. National Guard Bureau, USPFO for Kansas, Topeka, Kan., is the contracting activity (W912JC-10-C-0004).

G & G Steel, Inc., Russellville, Ala., was awarded on Aug. 3 an $8,166,111 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract is to fabricate and install "Main lock Miter Gate for lock Miter Gate for Lock 27, Granite City Illinois." The work consists of fabricating, delivering and installing a replacement main lock for meter gate. Work is to be performed in Russellville, Ala. (W912P9-10-C-0427).

Tetra Tech Nus, Inc., Pittsburgh, Pa., was awarded on July 30 n $8,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract to provide environment support to military, civil, and federal agencies for the mobile U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Work is to be performed in Mobile, Ala., with an estimated completion date of Aug. 8, 2015. Bids were solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities website with 28 bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, Mobile, Ala., is the contracting activity (W91278-10-D-0096).

Alliant Techsystems, Inc., Mesa, Ariz., was awarded in July a $7,382,925 firm-fixed-price contract for 213,750 20mm MK244 multi-purpose traced with self destruct cartridges, "NSN: 1305-01-484-9674." Work is to be performed in Anoka, Minn. (15 percent); Independence, Mo. (35 percent); and Mesa, Ariz. (50 percent), with an estimated completion date of March 31, 2014. Two bids were solicited with two bids received. HQ, Army Sustainment Command, AMSAS-ACA-F, Rock Island, Ill., is the contracting activity (W52P1J-09-C-0022).

EOD Technology, Lenoir, Tenn., was awarded on Aug. 4 a $6,951,496 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-quantity contract. This contract is for armed security guard for Camp Duffman, located on Forward Operating Base Fenty, Afghanistan. Work is to be performed in Afghanistan, with an estimated completion date of Feb. 29, 2012. One bid was solicited with received. Fenty Regional Contracting Center, Airfield, Afghanistan, is the contracting activity (W91B4K-09-D-0001-0005).

Luhr Bros, Inc., Columbia, Ill., was awarded on July 29 a $6,686,324 construction contract for stone dike construction at "Below Belle Island, MS and Marshall Brown Point. (Flood Control, Mississippi River and Tributaries, Mississippi River, Stone Dike Construction, Below Belle Island, Miss., RM 457.6-L, AHP and Marshall Brown Point, Miss, 444.6-L, AHP)." Work is to be performed in Warren County, Miss., with an estimated completion date of Jan. 30, 2011. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with two bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg Contracting Office, Vicksburg, Miss., is the contracting activity (W912EQ-10-D-0006).

James Talcott Construction, Great Falls, Mont., was awarded on July 30 a $6,176,500 firm-fixed-price contract for supervision, plant, labor, equipment, appliance, materials, expertise and incidentals for performing all work in strict accordance with the specifications and drawings for the Great Falls Armed Forces Reserve Center addition/alteration. This is a Base Closure and Realignment "05" project. Work is to be performed in Great Falls, Mont., with an estimated completion date of June 16, 2011. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with three bids received. National Guard Bureau, USPFO for Montana, Fort Harrison, Mont., is the contracting activity (W9124V-07-D-0002).

GM GDLS Defense Group, LLC, Sterling Heights, Mich., was awarded on July 29 a $6,100,848 firm-fixed-price contract for the procurement of 36 Stryker Gun System Gen II air conditioning kits. Work is to be performed in Sterling Heights, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-07-D-M1112).

Dutra Dredging Co., San Rafael, Calif., was awarded on Aug. 3 a $6,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for rental of Hopper dredge with attendant plant and operators for maintenance dredging of mobile harbor channel, Mobile, Ala. Work is to be performed in Mobile, Ala., with an estimated completion date of Oct. 30, 2011. Bids were solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities website with one bid received. U.S. Army, Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, Mobile, Ala., is the contracting activity (W91278-10-D-0099).

Lee Grover Construction Co., St. Joseph, Mo., was awarded on Aug. 4 a $5,709,080 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract is to construct 16,859 square feet to Phase I structure of the fire crash/rescue station. Phase II consists of four vehicle bays with drive through capabilities; storage and maintenance rooms; bedrooms; kitchens and day room; shower/locker and restroom; station alarm room; and mechanical and electrical rooms. Work is to be performed in St. Joseph, Mo., with an estimated completion date of Sept. 20, 2011. Nineteen bids were solicited with four bids received. National Guard Bureau Missouri, Jefferson City, Mo., is the contracting activity (W912NS-08-D-0010).

The Boeing Co., Ridley Park, Pa., was awarded on Aug. 3 a $5,672,833 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract. The purpose of this delivery order modification is to perform 27,310 hours of engineering services support of CH-47F unique items identification candidates, non-recurring engineering. Work is to be performed in Ridley Park, Pa., with an estimated completion date of Jan. 31, 2012. One bid was solicited with one bid relieved. U.S. Army Contracting Command, CCAM-CH-A, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-04-G-0023).

Science Application International Corp., Chantilly, Va., was awarded on Aug. 2 a $5,483,145 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, firm-fixed-price contract. This contract is for the Global Geospatial Intelligence data products in support of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. Work is to be performed in St. Louis, Mo. (50 percent), and Chantilly, Va. (50 percent), with an estimated completion date of July 29, 2010. One bid was solicited with one bid received. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, ACSM, St, Lois, Mo., is the contracting activity (NMA302-03-D-0007).

Southern Dredging Co., North Charleston, S.C., was awarded on Aug. 2 a $5,470,790 firm-fixed-price contract. The work consist of maintenance dredging: "approximately 2,211,000 cubic yards of unclassified material from Upper Charleston Harbor and TC Dock, Charleston and Berkeley Countries, South Carolina shall be deposited in the Clouter Creek Disposal Area, Middle and North Cells." Work is to be performed in Charleston, S.C., with an estimated completion data of Aug. 2, 2011. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with two bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers/Charleston District/Contracting Division, Charleston, S.C., is the contracting activity (W912HN-10-C-0052).

HydroGeoLogic, Inc., Reston, Va., was awarded on July 28 a $5,222,952 firm-fixed-price contract for strategic environmental research and development and environmental security technology certification program support services. The estimated completion date of the work is Aug. 5, 2015. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with one bid received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, HECSA Contracting, Alexandria, Va., is the contracting activity (W912HQ-10-D-0008).

NAVY

FASCAN International, Inc., Baltimore, Md., is being awarded a $6,341,529 firm-fixed-price requirements contract for the procurement of 62 Interrogation Arms and associated equipment, hardware, spare and repair parts, and logistics data development and documentation. The Interrogation Arm is a vehicle-mounted, Fassi crane arm with a boom, R-Vision camera, and a digging implement for digging and investigating suspected improvised explosive devices. Work will be performed in Baltimore, Md., and in Afghanistan. Work is expected to be completed Aug. 5, 2011. Contract funds in the amount of $3,170,764 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract is a sole-source procurement. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity (M67854-10-C-5099).

Halbert Construction Co., Inc.*, El Cajon, Calif., is being awarded $5,938,320 for firm-fixed-price task order #0007 under a previously awarded multiple award construction contract (N62473-09-D-1615) for consolidation of public works shops at Naval Base Point Loma, San Diego, Calif. The work to be performed provides for the removal/demolition of 29 deteriorated, obsolete, energy-consuming buildings, and to consolidate the relevant public works functions into a new centralized building. This is a design-build project. The project also includes three unexercised options which, if exercised, would increase the cumulative task order value to $7,199,895. The work will be performed in San Diego, Calif., and is expected to be completed by February 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Five proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity.

Northrop Grumman, Bethpage, N.Y., is being awarded a $5,865,828 ceiling priced delivery order #0012 under previously awarded contract (N00383-06-G-006B) for repairable support for advanced electronic attack components of the EA-18G aircraft. Work will be performed in Baltimore, Md. (84 percent); Bethpage, N.Y. (8 percent); Whidbey Island, Wash. (3 percent); Melbourne, Fla. (2 percent); St. Augustine, Fla. (2 percent); and Fort Wayne, Ind. (1 percent). Work is expected to be completed by January 2011. Contract funds will not expire by the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Inventory Control Point, Philadelphia, Pa., is the contracting activity.

PRT Bike Equation Changes Mean More Accurate Results

From Navy Personnel Command Public Affairs

MILLINGTON, Tenn. (NNS) -- The equation used to convert calories burned during the 12-minute physical readiness test (PRT) stationary bike test will change Jan. 1, 2011, the Navy announced in a message Aug. 5.

According to NAVADMIN 256/10, the revised equation will more accurately calculate outstanding performance.

It will also require the Sailor to burn more calories to achieve a probationary or satisfactory score on their PRT.

The only stationary bikes approved for use on the PRT are the Life Fitness 95CI and Classic Series and both are now on the online Physical Readiness Information Management System (PRIMS) calculator drop down menu. To access the bike calculator, go to the PRIMS homepage at https://prims2008.bol.navy.mil/

Enterprise Conducts Medical Response Training

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kristin M. Baker, USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Public Affairs

USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Enterprise (CVN 65) conducted its tailored ship's training availability (TSTA) while underway Aug. 5.

During TSTA, Enterprise Sailors faced realistic scenarios and exercises designed to assess their ability to react in emergency situations.

One of the key players in these exercises is Medical department, which is conducting training assessments and real-life scenarios throughout TSTA.

These drills help assess the crew's level of knowledge when responding to life-threatening injuries and provide on-site training. Well-trained Sailors can react quickly when they arrive on scene, rather than waiting for the medical response team – these valuable minutes can be the difference between life and death.

With more than 5,000 personnel aboard Enterprise during sustained combat operations at sea, knowledge is the power that saves lives and prevents injuries.

Sailors across the fleet learn to administer first aid for the eight basic war wounds most commonly sustained by Sailors.

"The Medical Training Team (MTT) will go to a space or department and drop off a wounded Sailor," said Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class (SW) Jason M. Corbett, a member of Medical department's Radiation Health division. "As the crew responds, an MTT member assesses the situation and provides the necessary training on the spot. This is done for all eight of the most common life-threatening injuries the crew may encounter."

During the underway period, Medical will also be conducting mass casualty drills, medical response team drills and general quarters drills. Each drill is evaluated and used as a training opportunity.

"This training allows the crew to prove to themselves and each other just how knowledgeable they are when it comes to saving a life," said Corbett. "It helps to build a trust that directly affects the crew's willingness to complete the mission."

Saving lives, conducting training and dealing with the common cold is an average day for the Medical Department aboard Enterprise. During TSTA, Medical Department continues their hard work to ensure all personnel aboard Enterprise are prepared for sustained combat operations at sea.

Enterprise is at sea conducting work-ups leading to its 21st deployment.

VA offers faster application process for veterans

WASHINGTON (AFRNS) -- As part of Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki's effort to streamline access to benefits, Department of Veterans Affairs officials removed the signature requirement for veterans who electronically submit an online 10-10EZ "Application for Health Benefits."

"This singular action will reduce days, if not weeks, for veterans who apply online to access their hard-earned medical benefits and upholds the promise to reduce access barriers to needed care for this nation's veterans," Secretary Shinseki said.

Previously, veterans filling out the online application were required to print a copy, sign it and send to their local medical center, or wait for a copy to be mailed to them for signature and mailing before enrollment into the VA health care system could occur.

For additional information, go to www.va.gov/healtheligibility or call VA's toll-free number at 877-222-8387. The online form is available at https://www.1010ez.med.va.gov/sec/vha/1010ez/.

For more retiree news and information, please visit http://www.retirees.af.mil/

Air Force dental team helps patients 'face' the world

by Sue Campbell
59th Medical Wing Public Affairs

8/4/2010 - LACKLAND AIR FORCE BASE, Texas (AFNS) -- The members of the 59th Dental Training Squadron here have a unique service they provide their patients. They help reconstruct their faces.

The Maxillofacial Prosthetics Department at MacKown Dental Clinic here employs a team that deals with the rehabilitation of patients with acquired and congenital defects of the head and neck region. They are one of only a few dental teams in the Department of Defense that creates prosthetic body parts such as eyes, ears and noses.

"We help wounded warriors who were injured on the battlefield, and also medical patients who have lost facial features due to disease, such as cancer," said Col. (Dr.) Joe Villalobos, the program director of Maxillofacial Prosthetics. "Facial prosthetic devices are an essential part of restoring their physical and psychological well being."

Patients are referred to the team from various medical departments at nearby Wilford Hall and Brooke Army Medical Centers, such as plastic surgery, otolaryngology, radiology/oncology, ophthalmology and the burn center. Dr. Villalobos works closely with each person to determine what he or she wants and needs.

"Normally, burn patients have already undergone many months of treatment, amputees have endured numerous surgeries and rehabilitation, and cancer patients have undergone surgery, received radiation and/or chemotherapy," Dr. Villalobos said. "The service we provide puts the final touches on returning them to a semblance of how they looked before their injury or illness."

Often most important to the patient is the restoration of function -- speech, chewing and swallowing -- in cases where injury or cancer to the mouth or jaws has occurred, he said.

The team's first step frequently starts in the stereolithography lab at MacKown Dental Clinic.

Stereolithography is a rapid prototyping method that allows the fabrication of anatomically-accurate, three-dimensional epoxy and acrylic resin models created from various types of medical data. There are numerous data formats that can be assimilated, some of which include those from computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and optical scanners.

"I can take a CT scan of a burn patient's head and create an exact replica, so our anaplastologist can build replacement ears and noses that will fit perfectly," said Dave Carballeyra, the stereolithography lab supervisor. "This technology is also used to incorporate dental and craniofacial implants to enhance the doctors' diagnosis and treatment planning."

The team's anaplastologist then works to create facial prosthetics for the patient.

Anaplastology is the art and science of restoring a malformed or absent part of the human body through artificial means, and Nancy Hansen is the only certified clinical anaplastologist in the DOD.

"Our patients are going through the traumatic experience of missing anatomical features," Ms. Hansen said. "We get to see them blossom because they are given hope."

Ms. Hansen said she begins by making an impression of the area of the missing anatomy.

Prosthetic noses, ears, jaws, even eyes can be made with silicone or hard resin. Many steps are taken to give the prosthesis a realistic look.

Then, the prosthesis is attached to the patient by various means, such as by surgically placing titanium implants into bone so that an ear can be magnetically attached, or by using adhesives that fasten the prosthesis to the face or head.

The prosthesis will be tried on and adjusted until it meets the patient's needs and comfort," Ms. Hansen said. "We are always a resource for them and they can always come back to us for follow-up treatment."

Another mission of the department is education.

"The 12-month 59th Medical Wing Maxillofacial Prosthetics Fellowship Program provides a one-of-a-kind comprehensive experience, promoting interservice jointness," Dr. Villalobos said. "Heavy clinical emphasis and technological proficiency provide our current fellow, U.S. Army Maj. Thomas Gunnell, the training needed to function as an educator, specialty consultant and expert clinician for medical centers throughout the DOD."

Acquisition Improvement Plan recaptures excellence

8/4/2010 - WASHINGTON (AFNS) -- When the Air Force Secretary and Chief of Staff signed the Acquisition Improvement Plan in May 2009, they launched a significant effort to help the service recapture acquisition excellence.

"A key element of this plan was the revitalization of the (Air Force) acquisition workforce," said Lt. Gen. Mark Shackelford, the military deputy to the assistant secretary of the Air Force for acquisition. "In fact, the emphasis on workforce improvements is one of the main differences between AIP and previous acquisition reform efforts.

In the past year, Air Force officials progressed towards their goal of a revitalized acquisition workforce, adding almost 2,000 positions at the various product centers, filling acquisition positions across the Air Force, and increasing training opportunities for acquisition personnel, General Shackelford said. Air Force Institute of Technology officials are supporting the AIP by creating new courses and increasing capacity in several existing courses, including the Intermediate Project Management Course (available to all acquisition professionals) and initial skills courses such as Fundamentals of Acquisition Management and the Mission-Ready Contracting Officer Course. Acquisition officials also achieved a 50-percent increase in its acclaimed Acquisition Leadership Challenge Program courses.

Along with expanded training opportunities for acquisition professionals, Air Force officials also offer personnel on acquisition coded positions 100 percent tuition assistance at accredited academic institutions, to satisfy the business hours and acquisition-related degrees (such as engineering, finance or business) needed for Acquisition Corps eligibility. Military members can apply through the Air Force Virtual Education Center via the Air Force Portal; civilians regardless of grade level should contact their respective career field team at the Air Force Personnel Center for details on how to apply.

Air Force officials still have many openings for civilian acquisition professionals, said Pat Hogan, the Air Force director of Acquisition Career Management. Openings at a variety of grade levels exist for program managers, engineers, logisticians, financial managers/cost estimators and contracting officers at acquisition locations across the country. In an effort with officials from the Office of Personnel Management, professional recruitment materials and websites are being developed for all acquisition centers. Recruitment websites are currently active and accepting resumes at the Electronic Systems Center (www.afesccareers.com) and the Space and Missile Systems Center (www.smcciviliancareers.com); with others following soon.

"These are also great opportunities for military personnel who are transitioning to civilian life and want to continue using their acquisition skills and training," Mr. Hogan said. "Because of the immediate and high demand for qualified acquisition professionals, the Defense Department delegated an expedited hiring authority to significantly reduce the time required to fill these positions."

Coronet mission helps fighters cross Atlantic, other long distances

by Staff Sgt. Austin M. May
100th Air Refueling Wing Public Affairs

8/4/2010 - ROYAL AIR FORCE MILDENHALL, England (AFNS) -- From a spectator's point of view, a Coronet mission may seem simple; a group of tankers flies with a group of fighters across the ocean, ensuring the smaller aircraft have enough fuel to get home.

Beyond that first glance, however, the "air bridge" is a complicated, critical mission which takes precise planning and coordination to complete. It's also a mission the 100th Air Refueling Wing members perform several times a week.

The term Coronet refers specifically to a movement of fighter aircraft, such as the F-22 Raptor, said Lt. Col. Jonathan Castellanos, the 351st Air Refueling Squadron director of operations. While heavy aircraft are refueled during their flights between continents, Coronets are specialized missions designed to let fighters traverse long distances safely.

Fighters move for a variety of reasons, the colonel said. Planes must be rotated in an out of the operational theaters to avoid overuse, meet maintenance requirements and, in some cases, stay with the units to which they're assigned.

While the intent is essentially the same as any other air refueling flight, allow aircraft to take on more gas without having to land, the procedure for a Coronet is different.

On a standard refueling sortie, a tanker will enter an orbit in an area of sky set aside for them. Fighters scheduled to refuel with the tanker know where it is and go to them, Colonel Castellanos said.

With a Coronet, the airspace designated for refueling moves with the group of aircraft and takes more coordination to avoid mishaps. Planes must be at precise coordinates and altitudes at the exact time scheduled for the mission to be a success.

In a standard air refueling mission, a receiver may take off, meet up with the tanker for fuel, and then leave for their mission. Coronet fighters must top off several times during the flight.

In the event a fighter must leave the tanker and land, they have to have enough fuel to get to a predetermined divert base. Maintenance issues, mission requirements and weather can affect which bases are available, so precise timing is required to ensure the fighters have the correct amount of fuel at certain points in the flight.

Usually, tankers from the 100th ARW will take fighters to a certain point and hand them over to another tanker to complete the journey. Depending on mission requirements, the KC-135 Stratotanker crew may stop somewhere overnight or return to Royal Air Force Mildenhall. On a recent Coronet during which KC-135 crews "dragged" F-22s across the Atlantic, the crew stopped overnight in Iceland to refuel and meet crew rest requirements.

While home, tanker crews based here have a unique role - they are "deployed in place," Colonel Castellanos said.

"When these Airmen go up to fly, they aren't just training or practicing for a deployment," he said. "They're doing their actual mission, and they do it 24 hours a day, seven days a week."

Despite the simple outward appearance of the air bridge, the crucial Coronet mission is an intensely precise cooperative effort, ensuring the fuel gets to the fighters no matter how far they need to go.

Air Force vice chief of staff visits Andersen AFB

by Tech. Sgt. Mike Andriacco
36th Wing Public Affairs

8/4/2010 - ANDERSEN AIR FORCE BASE, Guam (AFNS) -- Air Force Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Carrol H. "Howie" Chandler stopped here Aug. 2 through 4 to see firsthand how the 36th Wing Airmen furthers regional security in the Pacific theater.

General Chandler was joined on his trip by Maj. Gen. Douglas Owens, the Pacific Air Forces vice commander, a former 36th Wing commander.

As a former PACAF commander, General Chandler is no stranger to the mission of the 36th Wing. He said he sees it as a critical component to a secure Asia-Pacific region, both now and in the future.

"There is no doubt that Guam will continue to be important to us in helping maintain regional stability," he said. "Modern aerospace technology has dramatically increased the power and range of our aircraft, but it has not eliminated the need for presence."

The continuous bomber presence began in 2004. Since that time, there have always been bombers deployed to Andersen Air Force Base, whether they are B-1 Lancers, B-2 Spirits or B-52 Stratofortresses.

The operations tempo at Andersen AFB is also high due to rotating fighter aircraft units as part of the overall theater security package. Both TSP and CBP help keep the region secure thanks to Andersen's key location in the Pacific, General Chandler said. "Our current posture reflects this reality and relies on our presence on Guam and the Northern Marianas," General Chandler said. "Andersen Air Force Base is a key component of our long-term commitment to the region."

General Chandler also highlighted the important part Andersen AFB Airmen play in humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations. The location of the island serves as an ideal jumping off point for these types of missions.

Operation Pacific Angel, in which the United States works with local authorities to help underserved areas with medical and engineering assistance, typically stages from, or goes through, Andersen AFB.

"First and foremost, humanitarian missions like Pacific Angel let us help those in need around the Asia-Pacific region," General Chandler said. "In doing so, these kinds of missions allow us to work with partner nations."

When the U.S. officials work with officials from other nations, such as the Philippines, Vietnam and Bangladesh in recent Pacific Angel missions, it builds friendships that are vital to maintaining a peaceful and stable region, General Chandler said.

During his visit here, General Chandler viewed infrastructure projects set to improve the working environment, as well as initiatives geared toward improving quality of life and readiness.

A notable stop was at the new hangar 6, destined to support the RQ-4 Global Hawk mission scheduled to begin this fall.

"Global Hawk operations will enhance Andersen (AFB's) and PACAF's total force structure in the Pacific," said Col. Tod Fingal, the 36th Wing vice commander. "The (RQ-4) can be used to address common challenges such as humanitarian assistance and disaster relief efforts, piracy, and terrorism in the Pacific region."

After spending a few days at Andersen AFB, General Chandler said he was leaving impressed by the professionalism and the esprit de corps of those stationed and deployed here.

"It is clear that Andersen (AFB's) Airmen understand the important role they play in the region, and that they are truly dedicated to the mission," General Chandler said. "I just want to say 'thank you' to all the Airmen and their families who continue to serve proudly at Andersen (AFB)."

Service Members Become Citizens During Seattle Fleet Week

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jason Tross, Navy Public Affairs Support Element-West, Det. Northwest

SEATTLE (NNS) -- Fourteen Soldiers, Sailors and Coast Guardsmen became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held aboard USS Port Royal (CG 73) during the Seattle Seafair Fleet Week's Parade of Ships Aug. 4 in Seattle.

Each took the Oath of U.S. Citizenship and pledged allegiance to the U.S. Constitution during the at-sea ceremony.

"This is a very special day for me," said Navy Culinary Specialist Seaman Yi Chen. "Becoming a U.S. citizen means so much. I've got so much more freedom in this country. Before I could not get the job I wanted here or go to other countries. Now I have more opportunities in the Navy too."

"Usually naturalization ceremonies happen in a courtroom or in a room with some kind of presiding official. This is a very unique way to do something special for our service members," said guest speaker Cmdr. Dan Jones, a Navy Reserve legal officer.

According to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website, foreign service members may be eligible to apply for naturalization under special provisions outlined in the Immigration and Nationality Act.

"I can say that this process and the expedited [military] naturalization is a great recruiting tool and opportunity for our people and another great benefit of military service," said Jones.

Many people join the military for travel opportunities; Chen is no exception. Although Chen is a Sailor, this was his first time underway on a Navy ship. He and the other naturalizing service members were required to either stay stateside or in U.S. territories.

Non-citizen service members are also ineligible for officer commissioning programs, something two visiting Nepal-native U.S. Soldiers are now aiming for.

"Today's event is a big honor and opens up a new door for me," said Army Spc. Temba Sherpa. "Before I couldn't get the job I wanted. Even with a master's degree when I applied, I couldn't get it because I had to be a U.S. citizen. Now, after this and time in the Army, hopefully I can get those jobs or become an officer."

The USCIS naturalized more than 61,000 military members in ceremonies across the United States and in more than 20 countries since 2001. Military family members are also encouraged to take advantage of the expedited naturalization services offered by USCIS. More than 700 have done so since 2008 in Bulgaria, China, Germany, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Oman, Panama, South Korea, Spain, Thailand and the United Kingdom.