Military News

Wednesday, December 31, 2008

Military Books

Military-Writers.com is pleased to announce the addition of these servicemembers to the website:

Colonel Porcher L. Taylor, Jr. USA (ret.)
Colonel Lee Austin, USA (ret.)
Colonel Gregory Fontenot, USA (ret.)
Colonel Wilfred D. Boettiger, USA (ret.)
Colonel William T. Creech, USA (ret.)
Colonel George R. Maudlin, USA (ret.)
Captain Richard C. Knott, USN (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Burt Dodson, Jr., USAF (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Will Irwin, USA (ret.)
Lt. Colonel William Roosevelt Hudnall, USA (ret.)
Lt. Colonel George L. Wenrich, USAF (ret.)
Major James Bell, USA (ret.)
Major Patrick Parker, USA (ret.)
Lieutenant Commander Christopher P. Michaels, USN (ret.)
Lieutenant Daniel F. Stevens, USN (ret.)
Second Lieutenant Stephen M. Perrone, USA (ret.)

The Website now lists 715 servicemembers and their 2350 books.

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This information was sponsored by
Criminal Justice Degree information online.

New York Guard Readies for New Year's Eve

By Eric Durr
Special to American Forces Press Service

Dec. 31, 2008 - As New Yorkers and visitors gear up today for New Year's Eve celebrations, the citizen soldiers and airmen of the New York National Guard are ready to support
homeland security missions throughout the state, officials said. At the direction of Gov. David Paterson, members of the New York Army and Air National Guard will conduct additional security missions and stand ready to respond to local civil authorities if an emergency occurs.

In New York City, National Guard soldiers and airmen will conduct increased security operations at Penn Station, the Port Authority Trans-Hudson terminal and at LaGuardia and Kennedy airports in coordination with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

The National Guard's 2nd Civil Support Team, a full-time, rapid-response element that detects chemical, biological or radiological hazards, also will provide a detachment in Manhattan to support the New York Police Department. The 22-man detachment, based at the Scotia Air National Guard Base near Schenectady, N.Y., has worked with
New York City police for counterterrorism support operations since the unit's formation in 2000, state officials said.

At the New York National Guard headquarters in Latham, N.Y., staff representatives from New York state's military forces will operate the National Guard's joint operations center. This command and control node provides links to the New York State Emergency Management Office and New York State Office of
homeland security.

The New York National Guard also will provide liaison officers to New York's emergency management office and the
New York City police.

(Eric Durr serves with the New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs.)

Face of Defense: Mother, Daughter Enlist in Army Reserve

By Al Laxamana
Special to American Forces Press Service

Dec. 31, 2008 - Like many high school seniors, Megan Schlotthauer wasn't sure what she wanted to do after graduation. Her grades weren't the best, and college is expensive. Searching for a purpose, the 17-year-old decided to explore her options in the
Army Reserve.

"I was looking at the community colleges, and thought I would go there," she said. "Then I was talking to some people I know who are in the
Navy Reserve, and some friends who have been in the military, and I thought that's what I wanted to do."

She presented the idea to her mother, Lisa Altoon, who wasn't receptive to the notion of her cheerleader daughter joining the
Army.

"I was dead set against it from the beginning," she said.

Altoon, like many parents, was concerned about the possibility of Megan deploying to a combat zone. That is, until she met her daughter's recruiter,
Army Sgt. 1st Class Jessica Dean of the Fremont, Calif., recruiting station. Dean proved to be a persuasive recruiter.

After learning about the
Army Reserve, Altoon, a postal carrier in Fremont, decided that she, too, would become a soldier. Until recently, someone her age with no prior service would have been too old to enlist. Since the Army increased its maximum age to 42 in 2006, however, the door was wide open for the 39-year-old.

Mother and daughter enlisted in the same military occupational specialty -- computer information specialist -- and were assigned to the same unit, the 351st
Civil Affairs Command in Mountain View, Calif.

Though Altoon originally was skeptical about her daughter joining, she said being in the same Reserve unit has its advantages.

"I'm a mom," she said. "This will give me a chance to protect her and keep an eye on her."

Altoon began basic training at Fort Jackson, S.C., in October, followed by advanced individual training at Fort Gordon, Ga., to train as a
computer specialist. Schlotthauer leaves for Fort Jackson in August.

Both soldiers said they're aware they might be deployed in support of the global war on terrorism, but insist they'll be ready if that time comes.

"Honestly, if I'm meant to go to Iraq, I'll go to Iraq," Schlotthauer said.

Her mother, and now her fellow soldier, agreed. "If it's meant for me to go, then that's what's going to happen," Altoon said.

(Al Laxamana serves in the Fresno Recruiting Battalion.)

MILITARY CONTRACTS December 31, 2008

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

Oshkosh Corp., Oshkosh, Wis. is being awarded a maximum $1,121,351,999 firm fixed price, indefinite delivery, sole source contract for heavy and medium
Tactical trucks support. There are no other locations of performance. Using services are All DoD and civilian agencies. There were originally two proposals solicited with one response. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is December 31, 2009. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Columbus (DSCC), Columbus, Ohio (SPM7LX-09-D-9008).

Lockheed Martin Services, Inc., Gaithersburg, Md. is being awarded a maximum $24,430,213 firm fixed price, sole source, time material contract for operational sustainment, maintenance and development of Civilian Personnel Management System-Defense Civilian Personnel Data System (DCPDS). Other location of performance is Texas. Using services are
Army, Navy, Air Force and Federal Civilian Agencies. The original proposal was solicited with one response. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is December 31, 2009. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia (DSCP), Philadelphia, Pa. (SP4700-05-C-0020).

Friction Product Co., Medina, Ohio is being awarded a maximum $9,985,600 fixed price with economic price adjustment contract for HMMWV brake parts. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is
Army. There were originally three quotes received with three responses. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is November 11, 2009. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Columbus (DSCC), Columbus, Ohio (SPM7L3-08-M-2351).

Air Liquide Industrial U.S.L.P. Houston, Texas is being awarded a minimum $9,515,116 firm fixed price contract for production of liquid nitrogen and related ancillary services. Other locations of performance are California and Colorado. Using services are
Army, Air Force, federal civilian agencies and defense contractors. The original proposal was solicited on FedBizOps with five responses. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is September 30, 2013. The contracting activity is the Defense Energy Support Center (DESC), Lackland AFB, Texas (SP0600-09-D-1515).


Army

Lockheed Martin Corp., Missiles and Fire Control – Dallas, Grand Prairie, Texas, was awarded on Dec 29, 2008 a $371,641,040 firm/fixed/price contract for Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System Full Rate Production IV – initial contract award; 3780 unitary and 4782 RRPRs GMLRS rockets. Work is to be performed in Grand Prairie, Texas; East Camden, Ark.; and Orlando, Fla., with an estimated completion date of Dec. 22, 2009. One bid was solicited and one bid received. U.S.
Army Aviation & Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal is the contracting activity (W31P4Q-08-C-0001).

AM General, LLC, South Bend, Ind., was awarded on Dec. 30, 2008 a $252,202,191 firm/fixed/price contract to add 1,698 EA High Mobility Multi-Purpose Wheeled Vehicles to contract. Work will be performed in Mishawaka, Ind., with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2009. One bid was solicited and one bid received. Tank and Automotive Command, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (DAAE07-01-C-S001).

PAE Government Services, Los Angeles, CA., was awarded on Dec. 28, 2008 a $60,000,000 firm/fixed/price contract to support the maintenance of the Afghan National
Army for class IX parts. Work will be performed in Afghanistan with an esti mated completion date of Dec. 31, 2010. One bid was solicited and one bid received. Joint Contracting Command-Iraq/Afghanistan, Kabul Regional Contracting Center, Kabul, Afghanistan is the contracting activity (W91B4M-08-C-0009).

Lockheed Martin Corp., Missiles and Fire Control – Dallas, Grand Prairie, Texas, was awarded on Dec. 29, 2008 a $52,483,900 firm/fixed/price contract for Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System Full Rate Production III – option exercise; UAE DPICM 43 rocket pods. Work is to be performed in Grand Prairie, Texas; East Camden, Ark.; and Orlando, Fla., with an estimated completion date of Oct 31, 2011. One bid was solicited and one bid received. U.S.
Army Aviation & Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal is the contracting activity (W31P4Q-08-C-0021).

Au Authum Ki, Inc., Chandler, Ariz., was awarded on Dec. 30, 2008 a $17,254,694 firm/fixed/price contract for a task order against a Multiple Award Task Order Contract (MATOC) in support of the Center of Standardization for dining facilities with the primary focus of this task order will be work at Fort Bliss, Texas. The work will include design/build dining facilities and all supporting elements. The scope of this contract shall be design and construct two Infantry Brigade Combat Team
Army standard dining facilities, to include furniture and Government Furnished Government Installed Equipment. Work will be performed at Fort Bliss, Texas with an estimated completion date of Dec 31, 2010. Three bids were solicited with three bids received. U.S. Army Engineer District, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (W91236-08-D-0067).

Alutiiq International Solutions, LLC, Huntsville, Ala., was awarded on Dec. 30, 2008 a $14,459,422 firm/fixed/price contract for a design-build project for 46,992 gross square foot addition to the northwest end of Building 4200 located at Fort Lee, Va. It also includes site demolition, site grading and preparation, site utilities and improvements. Work will be performed at Fort Lee, Va., with an estimated completion date of Aug 30, 2010. Sixty-Two bids were solicited with twelve bids received. U.S.
Army Engineer District, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (W91236-09-C-0016).

Oshkosh Corp., Oshkosh, Wis., was awarded on Dec. 30, 2008 a $7,209,948 firm/fixed/price contract for engines, transmissions, and transfer cases (multiple national stock numbers with quantities listed below) for the A4 model 'Heavy Expanded Mobility
Tactical Truck' (HEMTT) as a result of solicitation W56HZV-08-R-0811. NSN: 2815-01-562-6787, basic quantity of 100 each with 100% option; NSN: 2520-01-562-6793, basic quantity of 100 each with 100% option, NSN: 2520-01-563-6518, basic quantity of 50 each with 100% option. Work will be performed in Oshkosh, Wis., with an estimated completion date of Dec. 17, 2009. Bids were solicited by Sole Source Noble Eagle with one bid received. Tank and Automotive Command, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-09-C-0208).

Air Force

The
Air Force is modifying a contract with the Boeing Aerospace Operations Inc, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma $48,225,480. This contractor logistics support/umbrella engineering services support provides sustaining and non-recurring engineering services to support research and development, aircraft modifications, aircraft maintenance and technical services for Boeing commercial derivative military use aircraft. At this time, $11,551,273.33 has been obligated. 727 ACSG/PKA, Tinker AFB, Oklahoma is the contracting activity (FA810607-07-C-0001-P00040).

The
Air Force is modifying a firm-fixed price contract with Lockheed Martin Corp., Lockheed Martin Aeronautics, Ft. Worth, Texas for $9,877,310. This is an F-16 provisioned items order procurement for the following spares: a) 21 combined interrogator transponder, Advanced Identification Friend or Foe System b) beam forming network, Advanced Identification Friend of Foe System. OO-ALC/448 SCMG/PKAB, Hill AFB, Utah is the contracting activity (FA8206-07-C-0001-PM0497).

The
Air Force awarded a firm-fixed price contract to MacAulay-Brown, Inc., Dayton, Ohio for $9,800,000. This will authorize senior consulting and specialized technical support for archival, corporate development, air and weapons division, space and missile division, base realignment and closure, systems engineering, program management, test, organizational process analysis and process improvements, and strategic planning and transformation division. At this time, $1,169,700 has been obligated. ASC/AQZCA, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8622-09-D-8000).

The
Air Force is modifying a firm-fixed price contract to General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York for $6,091,612. The contract provides for research and development in the area of space electronic components and responsive systems elements. At this time, $50,000 has been obligated. AFRL/RVKE, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA9453-09-V-0305).

Tuesday, December 30, 2008

Army Destroys Last Landmine Containing VX Nerve-Agent Munitions

American Forces Press Service

Dec. 30, 2008 - The U.S.
Army Chemical Materials Agency destroyed the last landmine in its stockpiles containing VX nerve-agent munitions Dec. 24 at the Anniston Chemical Agent Disposal Facility in Anniston, Ala. "We have reached a truly remarkable milestone following more than five years of deliberate, but careful, operations," Timothy K. Garrett, ANCDF site project manager, said. "All nerve-agent munitions -- those containing GB and those containing VX -- have been safely processed."

CMA personnel and contractors have destroyed the VX munitions at six disposal sites: Anniston, Ala.; Umatilla, Ore.; Newport, Ind.; Pine Bluff, Ark.; Tooele, Utah; and Johnston Island, about 800 miles southwest of Hawaii.

"I commend Anniston and all CMA destruction sites on this extraordinary achievement. By destroying the VX agent at each of CMA's destruction sites, you have made the world a much safer place," Conrad Whyne, CMA director, said. CMA continues to safely and securely store the remaining VX in the U.S. chemical weapons stockpile at the Blue Grass Chemical Activity near Richmond, Ky., officials said. Construction is under way on a neutralization facility there, and the U.S.
Army Element Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternatives is charged with the agent's destruction.

Destruction of chemical weapons already is complete at Newport, Aberdeen and Johnston Island, officials said. Operations continue at Tooele, Umatilla, Anniston and Pine Bluff, CMA's remaining destruction sites. These sites are destroying or preparing to destroy blister agent and the only remaining nerve agent for CMA's destruction mission -- GA at Tooele, officials said. VX is the least volatile, but most potent, of all chemical warfare agents, officials said. The agent attacks the nervous system, causing muscles to convulse uncontrollably. Exposure can result in loss of consciousness, convulsions, paralysis and respiratory failure.

The nerve agent first was developed in the early 1950s. The nation's original stockpile of about 4,400 tons was produced at Newport Chemical Depot between 1961 and 1969. Newport's production facility was destroyed in 2006. The nerve agent never was used in combat by the United States.

"The elimination of this deadly chemical agent from each site's stockpile is a relief to the stockpile communities, and a sign of our commitment to other nations as we move one step closer to a safer world," Whyne said.

(From a U.S.
Army Chemical Materials Agency news release.)

Armed Forces Inaugural Committee Moves Into High Gear

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

Dec. 30, 2008 - Exactly three weeks before Inauguration Day, the buzz of activity at the Armed Forces Inaugural Committee here is a notable exception to the traditional holiday lull that settles over the nation's capital between Christmas and New Year's Day. More than 400 soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen – active duty, reservists and National Guardsmen -- are busy preparing for President-elect Barack Obama's inauguration Jan. 20. Another 300 will report for duty after New Year's, bringing AFIC to full strength with about 700 servicemembers.

"We're spinning up for the full dress rehearsal Jan. 11,"
Navy Lt. Mike Billips, a reservist from Atlanta serving as an AFIC spokesman, said. The rehearsal will kick off in the dark at about 3 a.m., when participants go through two full iterations of the swearing-in ceremony at the Capitol, then parade down Pennsylvania Avenue toward the White House.

"The curtain goes up on Jan. 20, and everything has to be locked down perfect before then," Billips said. "So it's a lot of rehearsal, a lot of coordination and a lot of training for the people who are coming in."

The incoming servicemembers will get intensive training for the ceremonial support they'll provide at the inauguration ceremony and 10 official inaugural balls, Billips said. Some will be in the midst of the fanfare, serving as honor guards, marching bands, musical units, salute batteries, drivers, ushers and escorts for distinguished visitors. Others will work behind the scenes, helping to ensure the events go off seamlessly.

Air Force Staff Sgt. Matthew Finney, a telecommunications technician from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, assigned to AFIC's information technology directorate, called being a part of the inauguration a rare opportunity. "I am excited to be a part of our nation's history," he said.

"I am honored to be a part of a committee of this caliber," Army Spc. Kevyn Coleman agreed. "This is definitely an assignment to talk about years from now. In my personal opinion, I don't think that I have ever had a better assignment."

The 2009 inauguration will be the 56th in which the military has played a role in welcoming the incoming commander in chief. During the first, in April 1789, U.S. Army, local militia units and Revolutionary War veterans escorted George Washington to his inaugural ceremony at New York City's Federal Hall.

MILITARY CONTRACTS December 30, 2008

MISSILE DEFENSE AGENCY CONTRACT AWARD

The Boeing Co., Integrated Defense Systems,
Huntsville, Alabama, is being awarded $397,900,000 (not-to-exceed ceiling) for a cost plus award fee, cost plus fixed fee contract to continue development of the Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) program; including Block 3 development and fielding activities for six months until a long-term, Core Completion contract for development can be awarded. The principal place of performance will be at the contractor's facility in Huntsville, Alabama. The contract funds will not expire at the end of the fiscal year. This is a sole source contract under the authority of 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1). The Missile Defense Agency, Huntsville, Alabama, is the contracting activity (HQ0147-09-C-0008). The period of performance is from January 2009 through June 2009. FY09 research, development, test and evaluation funds (RDT&E) funds will be used.

Army

Alliant Lake City Small Caliber Ammunition Co., LLC, Independence, Mo., was awarded on Dec 29, 2008 a $49,236,000 firm fixed price requirements contract for modernization and upgrade of small caliber production equipment. Work will be performed at the Lake City
Army Ammunition Plant, Independence, Mo., with an estimated completion date of Sep 30, 2009. One bid was solicited and one bid received. U.S. Army Sustainment Command, Rock Island, Ill., is the contracting activity (DAAA09-00-D-0016).

DRS Optronics, Inc, Optronics Division,
Palm Bay, Fla., was awarded on Dec 29, 2008 a $30,348,977 firm fixed price and cost plus fixed fee five-year contract that will cover spares, repairs and services for the mast-mounted sight for KIOWA and award of Order 0001 for the services for Program Year One. Award of a 5-year indefinite delivery, indefinite quality contract and issuance of orders under such contract allows the government to meet its need more rapidly and advantageously, reducing Administrative Lead-Time (ALT); thereby saving time and money. Work will be performed in Melbourne, Fla., with an estimated completion date of Dec 31, 2013. One bid was solicited and one bid received. U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-09-D-0001).

Weeks Marine, Inc., Covington, La., was awarded on Dec 29, 2008 a $7,844,330 firm fixed price contract for work consisting of dredging approximately 1,200,000 cubic yards of maintenance material with a deep draft pipeline dredge. Work will be performed in Harris County, Texas with an estimated completion date of Mar 31, 2009. Four bids were solicited with three bids received. USA Engineer District, Savannah, Ga., is the contracting activity (W912HY-09-C-0004).

Air Force

The
Air Force awarded a contract to the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems (GA-ASI), San Diego, California for $42,638,374. This contract includes all program management, urgent repairs and services, logistics support, configuration management, technical manual and software maintenance, engineering technical services, contractor engineering technical specialists, contractor inventory control point and spares management, depot repair, flight operations support, reliability/maintenance enhancements, and CAMS/REMIS/CEMS data collection/entry for the Predator/Reaper MQ-1 and MQ-9 Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) program. At this time, $42,638,374 has been obligated. 703rd Aeronautical Systems Squadron, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8620-05-G-3028-0048).

The
Air Force awarded a contract to Honeywell International Incorporated, Clearwater, Florida for $26,539,601. This contract provides for 316 EGI Production units, 58 EGI Multi-Mode Receivers, and 33 EGI Contractor Deport Repairs. At this time, $26,539,601 has been obligated. 647 AESS/PK, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8626-06-C-2065-P00078).

The
Air Force awarded a firm fixed price contract to the Computer Sciences Corp., (CSC), Falls Church, Virginia for $9,192,534. This will authorize CSC to provide technical support of Applications Infrastructure and Systems Supports for programs within the Mission Systems. At this time, $9,192,534 has been obligated. HQ AMC/A7KQB, Scott AFB, Illinois is the contracting activity (FA4452-09-D-0004, 0001).

The
Air Force awarded a firm fixed price contract to Eaton Electrical Incorporated, Raleigh, North Carolina for $9,192, 523. This will authorize Eaton to provide an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) system to sustain, filter, create redundancy and establish emergency power for mission critical equipment at the Defense Information Systems Agency. At this time, $9, 192,523 has been obligated. 84 CBSG/PK, Hill AFB, Utah is the contracting activity (FA8217-09-C-007).

The
Air Force modified a contract with Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co.,, Sunnyvale, California for $7,189,000. This contract action authorizes Lockheed to perform two additional thermal vacuum (TVAC) cycles on the AEHF Space Vehicles 2. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC), Military Satellite Communications Systems Wing (MCSW)/PKA, El Segundo, California is the contracting activity (F04701-02-C-002, P00343).

The
Air Force modified a contract with Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co.,, Sunnyvale, California for $9,909,270. This modification will provide feasibility studies to extend the Advanced High Frequency (AEHF) system in the Military Satellite Communications Program. At this time, $9,909,270 has been obligated. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC), Military Satellite Communications Systems Wing (MCSW)/PKA, El Segundo, California is the contracting activity (F04701-02-C-002, P00340).

The
Air Force awarded a firm fixed-price contract action to Northrop Grumman Systems Corp.,, Rolling Meadows, Illinois for $5,934,743. This will authorize Northrop Grumman to provide contractor logistic support for the LITENING Advanced Targeting Pod. At this time, $5, 934,743 has been obligated. 647 AESS/PK, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio is the contracting activity (F33657-98-C-2020-P00104).

UNITED STATES TRANSPORTATION COMMAND

Sealift Inc. of Oyster Bay, N.Y. 11771-2298, is being awarded a $40,952,844 fixed price requirements contract for dedicated sealift services to transport lawful cargo by U.S. flag ships between points in the Continental United States of America (CONUS) and the terminals in Antigua and Ascension Islands. This contract is expected to be completed by December 31, 2011. Orders placed against this contract will be funded at the time the cargo is booked. This contract is a 100% Small Business Set Aside acquisition with three bids received. The contracting activity is United States Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM) Directorate of Acquisition, Scott
Air Force Base, Ill. (HTC711-09-D-0005).

NAVY

Watts Constructors, LLC, Honolulu, Hawaii, is being awarded a $25,376,000 firm fixed price contract for the construction of a Wideband Satellite Communications Operations Center at the Naval
Computer and Telecommunications Area Master Station (NCTAMS) Pacific. The contract also contains one unexercised option, which if exercised would increase cumulative contract value to $25,909,000. Work will be performed in Wahiawa, Oahu, Hawaii, and is expected to be completed by May 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website with four proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Pacific, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is the contracting activity (N62742-09-C-1300).

Lockheed Martin Corp., Marietta, Ga., is being awarded an $18,667,585 indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity contract (N00019-09-D-0015) for logistics and technical engineering services in support of the U.S.
Marine Corps' KC-130J aircraft. Work will be performed in Cherry Point, N.C., and is expected to be completed in December 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

L-3 Communications Vertex Aerospace LLC, Madison, Miss., is being awarded a $10,400,000 modification to a previously awarded indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity delivery order contract (N68936-06-D-0024) to provide specialized technical services in support of Depot Level Maintenance (DLM) work performed at the Fleet Readiness Center, Southwest (FRC-SW) on aircraft and rework of associated components and materials. Services to be provided include modifications, in-service repairs, and all other categories of service associated with aircraft DLM and its planning. The estimated level of effort for this modification is 346,666 man-hours. Work will be performed at FRC-SW, San Diego, Calif. (78 percent); the
Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS), Camp Pendleton, Calif. (9 percent); the Naval Air Station (NAS), Lemoore, Calif. (4 percent); the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, Pt. Mugu, Calif. (2 percent); NAS Whidbey Island, Bremerton, Wash. (2 percent); MCAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii (2 percent); MCAS Yuma, Ariz. (2 percent); and MCAS Miramar, Calif. (1 percent), and is expected to be completed in April 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake, Calif., is the contracting activity.

Lieutenant General Victor H. Krulak dies at 95

Lieutenant General Victor H. Krulak, USMC (ret.) died at the age of 95, Monday at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla, California.

Lt. Gen.
Victor H. Krulak saw action in World War II, Korea and Vietnam. In 1934, he was commissioned a second lieutenant upon graduation from the United States Naval Academy on May 31, 1934. His pre-World War Two assignments included: sea duty aboard USS Arizona; the U.S. Naval Academy; 6th Marines in San Diego; and, the 4th Marines in China. As a Lieutenant Colonel, during World War Two, he earned the Navy Cross and the Purple Heart on Choiseul Island, where his battalion staged a week-long diversionary raid to cover the Bougainville invasion.

At the outbreak of the Korean War he was serving as Assistant Chief of Staff, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific. He served in Korea with the 1st Marine Division as the Chief of Staff.

In 1964, Victor H. Krulak was the Commanding General, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific. Between 1964 and 1968, he made over 50 trips to Vietnam. Lieutenant General Victor H. Krulak retired in the 1968 and is the author of First to Fight: An Inside View of the U.S. Marine Corps.

According to the book description of First to Fight: An Inside View of the U.S. Marine Corps, “In this riveting insider's chronicle, legendary Marine General "Brute" Krulak submits an unprecedented examination of U.S. Marines—their fights on the battlefield and off, their extraordinary esprit de corps. Deftly blending history with autobiography, action with analysis, and separating fact from fable, General Krulak touches the very essence of the Corps: what it means to be a Marine and the reason behind its consistently outstanding performance and reputation.

Krulak also addresses the most basic but challenging question of all about the Corps: how does it manage to survive—even to flourish—despite overwhelming political odds and, as the general writes, "an extraordinary propensity for shooting itself in the foot?" To answer this question Krulak examines the foundation on which the Corps is built, a system of intense loyalty to God, to country, and to other Marines. He also takes a close look at Marines in war, offering challenging accounts of their experiences in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. In addition, he describes the Corps's relationship to other services, especially during the unification battles following World War II, and offers new insights into the decision-making process in times of crisis. First published in hardcover in 1984, this book has remained popular ever since with Marines of every rank.”

MORE INFORMATION
http://www.military-writers.com/marinecorps/victor_krulak.html

Navy to Commission Aircraft Carrier George H.W. Bush

The Navy's newest nuclear-powered aircraft carrier George H. W. Bush will be commissioned Saturday, Jan. 10, 2009, during an 11 a.m. EST ceremony at Naval Station Norfolk, Va.

President George W. Bush will deliver the principal address. Dorothy "Doro" Bush Koch, daughter of the ship's namesake, is the ship's sponsor. In the time-honored
Navy tradition, she will give the order to "man our ship and bring her to life!"

The lastNimitz-class aircraft carrier is named to honor World War II naval aviator and America's 41st president George H. W. Bush. Born on June 12, 1924, in Milton, Mass., Bush began a lifetime of service to America when he joined the Navy on his 18th birthday as a seaman. He became the youngest pilot in the Navy at the time, receiving his commission and naval aviator wings before his 19th birthday.

Bush flew the Avenger torpedo bomber in combat from the carrier USS San Jacinto. During an attack on enemy installations near Chichi Jima in September 1944, his plane was hit by enemy fire while making a bombing run. Although the plane was on fire and heavily damaged, he completed a strafing run on the target before bailing out of the doomed aircraft. Bush parachuted into the sea and was later rescued by the
Navy submarine USS Finback. He was later awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and three Air Medals for his Navy service in the Pacific theater during World War II.

After his time in the
Navy ended in September 1945, Bush held a number of public service roles that included two terms as a U.S. congressman from Texas, ambassador to the United Nations, chief of the U.S. Liaison Office to China and director of the Central Intelligence Agency. He then served two terms as vice president under the late President Ronald Reagan before being elected himself as President of the United States in 1988. As commander-in-chief, Bush led the United States and a coalition of nearly 30 other nations during Operation Desert Storm, which ended Iraq's invasion of Kuwait and liberated the people of the Persian Gulf nation.

Capt. Kevin O'Flaherty, from
Los Angeles, Calif., and a 1981 Naval Academy graduate, will become the ship's first commanding officer, leading a crew of more than 5,500 men and women, including embarked air wing personnel. George H. W. Bush will be initially homeported in Norfolk, Va., assigned to the U.S. Atlantic Fleet.

Construction of the tenth Nimitz-class ship took place at Northrop Grumman-Newport News, Va., starting with the ship's keel laying Sept. 6, 2003, and christening Oct. 7, 2006. George H. W. Bush towers 20 stories above the waterline, displaces approximately 95,000 tons of water, has a flight deck width of 252 feet, and at 1,092 feet long, is nearly as long as the Empire State Building is tall. This floating airfield has a flight deck that covers 4.5 acres. Bush's two nuclear reactors are capable of more than 20 years of continuous service without refueling, providing virtually unlimited range and endurance, and a top speed in excess of 30 knots.

The ship will support a wide variety of aircraft, including the F/A-18C Hornet and F/A-18E/F Super Hornet strike fighters, the E-2C/D Hawkeye Airborne Early Warning aircraft, the C-2 Greyhound logistics aircraft, the EA-6B Prowler and the EA-18G Growler electronic warfare aircraft, multi-role SH-60 and MH-60 helicopters, and other future carrier-based aircraft.

Interested media may contact the
Navy Office of Information at (703) 697-5342. Additional information on Nimitz-class carriers is also available online at
http://www.navy.mil/navydata/fact_display.asp?cid=4200&tid=200&ct=4 .

U.S. Military Team in Israel Reported Safe Despite Attacks

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

Dec. 30, 2008 - About 100 U.S. European Command soldiers, airmen and Marines deployed to Israel to help set up an early warning radar system reported no close encounters with air strikes or retaliatory attacks along the Gaza Strip, a Eucom spokesman said. The Palestinian militant group Hamas refused to renew a ceasefire agreement with Israel when it expired Dec. 19, and began stepping up rocket attacks on civilian targets in Israel. Israel, in turn, began launching airstrikes against Gaza Strip targets Dec. 27 in an effort to eliminate Hamas' ability to fire rockets into Israeli territory.

Air Force Lt. Col. John Dorrian confirmed Stars and Stripes' report that the Eucom team is operating on an Israeli air base nowhere near the targeted areas.

The Eucom troops deployed to Israel to help set up an Army/Navy Transportable Radar Surveillance system, Dorrian confirmed. The Israeli government requested the system to help defend against a potential missile attack from Iran.

Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates signed off on the deployment order in mid-September, Pentagon Press Secretary Geoff Morrell confirmed during a Sept. 30 news conference.

Once fully operational, the system will be capable of tracking and identifying small objects at long distance and at very high altitude, including space, according to U.S. Missile Defense Agency officials. It also will integrate Israel's missile defenses with the U.S. global missile detection network.

"This will enable the Israelis to track medium- and long-range ballistic missiles multiple times better than their current radar allows them to," Morrell said. "It will ... more than double the range of Israel's missile defense radars and increase its available engagement time."

This, he said, will greatly enhance Israel's defensive capabilities.

"There is a growing ballistic missile threat in the region, particularly from Iran," Morrell said. "And no one in the region should feel more nervous about that threat than the Israelis. And they clearly do, and they have asked for our assistance. And we have now provided it in the form of this ... X-band radar equipment."

About 120 U.S. servicemembers initially deployed to Israel to set up the system, a number Dorrian said is now down to about 100.

Morrell estimated that the system will take about half that many U.S. personnel to operate once it is up and running. "This is and will remain a U.S. radar system," he said. "This is not something we are giving or selling to the Israelis."

The system, he said, is another sign of U.S. commitment to Israel. "We are committed to the Israelis, to Israel's defense," Morrell said.

Meanwhile, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice expressed concern about escalating violence in Gaza.

Monday, December 29, 2008

Coalition Ships Seize 20 Tons of Drugs

American Forces Press Service

Dec. 29, 2008 - Coalition warships operating in the North Arabian Sea and Gulf of Aden as part of Combined Task Force 150 have seized more than 20 tons of narcotics since October, with an estimated value of more than $100 million, officials said. CTF 150, also tasked with conducting counter-piracy operations, is part of a continual presence in the region committed to creating and maintaining a lawful maritime order.

The task force has seized more than 53 tons of narcotics during 2008, officials said. The drugs, seized by U.S. and Royal
Navy forces, otherwise could have been used to help fund the insurgency fighting coalition forces in Afghanistan and contributed to instability in the region, officials said.

"The seizure of these drugs cuts off a vital lifeline of funds to those conducting destabilizing activities in the region," said Royal
Navy Commodore Tim Lowe, deputy commander of Combined Maritime Forces. "By stemming the flow of these drugs, we play a crucial role in providing security and stability to the entire region."

Sailors discovered hidden drugs in vessels operating along the so-called "Hash Highway." They destroyed large quantities of narcotics, but always ensured sufficient evidence was gathered to aid in subsequent investigations by local authorities after the drug smugglers were handed over for prosecution, officials said.

"The smugglers need to know there are consequences for their actions," Lowe said. "By aggressively patrolling these waters, we send a message to all would-be smugglers that we are here, and we won't tolerate drug trafficking in international waters."

CTF 150 is a multinational task force that conducts maritime security operations in and around the Strait of Hormuz, Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman, Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean and the Red Sea.

(From a Combined Maritime Forces news release.)

Face of Defense: Amputee Earns Commission Through Army ROTC

By Paul Kotakis
Special to American Forces Press Service

Dec. 29, 2008 - The blast of a roadside bomb in Iraq's Sunni Triangle resulted in the amputation of a portion of Richard Ingram's left arm, but it did not rob him of his dream of becoming an
Army officer. Ingram's dream became a reality Dec. 13 when he graduated from North Georgia College and State University and became a second lieutenant.

"I am extremely proud to have earned a commission through the
Army ROTC program at North Georgia College, and I look forward to serving as an Army officer," Ingram said. "I didn't decide to do this just to get a slap on the back. I want to be an inspiration to others who were wounded."

He is the first individual with such severe combat injuries suffered during the global war on terrorism to earn a commission through the Army ROTC program, military officials said.

"I was honored to attend the ceremony at which this outstanding young man became an officer," Maj. Gen. Arthur M. Bartell, commanding general of U.S.
Army Cadet Command, said. "He has already assembled a remarkable record of achievement, both as a combat veteran and as a ROTC cadet."

The LaGrange, Ga., native was serving with the
Georgia Army National Guard's 48th Brigade Combat Team as a cavalry scout in June 2005 when his tactical vehicle was struck by an explosive device and rolled several times.

"I didn't think there was any way I was going to live through it when the truck started rolling," Ingram said. "But it was clear that I hadn't fulfilled my purpose in this life. Even though I was hurt, I knew I'd get to keep doing the things I love so much. I was being given another chance at life."

Ingram recovered at Walter Reed
Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C., where he received physical therapy and was fitted for a prosthetic device.

"The care that I got at Walter Reed was great," Ingram said. "But after a while I knew that it was time to get back to North
Georgia College and get on with my life and my education." He returned to classes at the school he had left when his National Guard unit was activated.

Ingram also returned to the
Army ROTC program, where he quickly showed that despite the wounds sustained in combat he was still in excellent physical condition. After successfully completing the Leadership Development and Assessment Course -- the Army ROTC training event conducted annually in Fort Lewis, Wash. -- it was clear that Ingram was capable of carrying out the demanding duties of an Army officer.

"Lieutenant Ingram demonstrated throughout his time in ROTC that he was more than capable -- both physically and mentally -- to be a highly effective leader in our Army,"
Army Col. Michael Pyott, professor of military science at North Georgia College, said.

"Once you spend time observing Richard, you forget that he has a physical disability," he continued. "He can run faster and do more physical training than most cadets. He will do an outstanding job leading troops in combat, and I know he will succeed in his goal to attend Airborne, Sapper and Ranger training."

While a full-time student at North
Georgia and an Army ROTC cadet, Ingram also served as an intern for U.S. Sen. John Douglas of Georgia, chairman of the Senate Veterans and Military Affairs Committee.

"I was impressed with his determination and effort to rehabilitate himself," Douglas said.

(Paul Kotakis works in the U.S.
Army Cadet Command public affairs office.)

MILITARY CONTRACTS December 29, 2008

NAVY

Rolls-Royce Corp.,
Indianapolis, Ind., is being awarded a $221,690,616 modification to a previously awarded firm fixed price contract (N00019-07-C-0060) to exercise options to procure 96 MV-22 and CV-22 AE1107C engines, and 1-year of support services. Work will be performed in Indianapolis, Ind., and is expected to be completed in December 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

American Bureau of Shipping (ABS),
Houston, Texas, is being awarded a $55,000,000 cost no fee, indefinite delivery, indefinitely quantity contract to provide for ship classification and classification-related services to be performed by the ABS (a congressionally recognized agent of the Government) for surface ships and craft being procured and maintained during their lifecycle by Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA). The ABS classification process using Naval Vessel Rules (NVR) forms the core of the certification process for surface ships procured by NAVSEA. New construction contracts require the ships to be designed and constructed in accordance with ABS Rules for Building and Classing Naval Vessels, and other referenced ABS Rules and Guides as necessary to comply with the designated class notations. Approximately 46 percent of the services will be performed in support of new construction DDG ships in Bath, Maine, Pascagoula, Miss. and Gulf Port, Miss. and approximately 46 percent in support of future LCS new construction ships in locations to be determined. The remaining 8 percent of services will be performed in Norfolk, Va., San Diego, Calif. and various worldwide points as specified in task orders to be issued, and work is expected to be completed by December 2013. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C. is the contracting activity. (N00024-09-D-4208)

DynCorp International LLC, Fort Worth, Texas is being awarded a $17,961,266 modification to a previously awarded cost plus fixed fee contract (N00019-06-C-0308) to exercise an option for maintenance services in support of for the Kuwaiti
Air Force F/A-18 Program under the Foreign Military Sales Program. Work will be performed in Kuwait (90 percent) and Fort Worth, Texas (10 percent), and is expected to be completed in December 2009. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command Patuxent River, Md. is the contracting activity.

Lockheed Martin Simulation, Training and Support,
Orlando, Fla. is being awarded a $15,609,350 firm fixed price contract for one first article Machinery Control System shipset, two additional MCS shipsets, and one Testing and Validation System for the DDG-51 modernization efforts. The MCS is a Hull, Mechanical and Electrical upgrade and part of a comprehensive plan to modernize the DDG-51 Class to ensure the ships remain combat relevant and affordable throughout their life. The focus of the MCS upgrade is to automate many manual functions to reduce manning levels and watch stander requirements. This contract includes options and engineering services which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $51,500,000. Work will be performed in Orlando, Fla. and is expected to be completed by April 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract wascompetitively procured via Federal Business Opportunities, with two offers received. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington Navy Yard, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00024-09-C-4201).

DE Technologies, Inc, King of Prussia, Pa., is being awarded a $6,907,641 cost plus fixed fee contract for the continued development of an offensive, directed-energy warhead for the compact rapid attack weapon. This project will develop technologies for a small diameter shaped charge warhead. Technologies include computational modeling and experimental investigation of shaped charge performance, and liner and shaped charge module design that is based on the computational and experimental results. Results delivered will include a shaped charge design and shaped charge liners to be inserted into a full-warhead development model. Work will be performed in King of Prussia, Pa., and work is expected to be completed June 20, 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured under the ONR Long Range Broad Agency Announcement for
Navy and Marine Corps Science and Technology, BAA number 08-001 published on Sept 5, 2007. The Office of Naval Research, Arlington, Va., is the contracting activity (N00014-09-C-0037).

Air Force

The
Air Force awarded a cost plus fixed fee contract to the Raytheon Co.,, McKinney, Texas for $27,337,466. This will authorize Raytheon to provide Contractor Logistics Support for the Multi-Spectral Targeting System for CY09. At this time, $4,053,991 has been obligated. 703rd Aeronautical Systems Group, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8620-06-G-4041 009).

The
Air Force awarded a firm fixed price contract to CDO, Dayton, Ohio; Green Tree Group, Beavercreek, Ohio; ITC, Dayton, Ohio; MacAulay-Brown, Inc., Dayton, Ohio and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc. Alexandria, Virginia for $9,800,000. This will authorize the five companies to provide senior consulting and specialized technical support for Archival, Corporate Development, Air and Weapons division, Space and Missile Division, Base Realignment and Closure, Systems Engineering, Program Management, Test, Organizational Process Analysis and Process Improvements, and Strategic Planning and Transformation Division. At this time, $1,169,700 has been obligated. ASC/AQZCA, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8622-09-8000).

The
Air Force awarded a firm fixed price contract action to the Boeing Co., Seattle, Washington for $11,183,600. This will authorize Boeing to continue to provide Engineering Services to maintain and upgrade the Air Launched Cruise Missile/Conventional Air Launched Cruise Missile. At this time, $4,490,754 has been obligated. 327 ACSG/PK, Tinker AFB, Oklahoma is the contracting activity (F34601-03-C-0042-P00117).

The
Air Force awarded a contract to L-3 Communications Corp., Link Simulation and Training, Arlington, Texas for $68,205,604. This contract provides for Block 40/50 F-16 Mission Training Centers (MTCs), with options to buy up to 20 MTCs. At this time, $844,066 has been obligated. 677 AESG/PK, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8621-09-C-6292).

Sunday, December 28, 2008

Military Books

Military-Writers.com is pleased to announce the addition of these servicemembers to the website:

Colonel Bruce K. Meyers, USMC (ret.)
Colonel Raff Rafferty, USA (ret.)
Colonel Donald H. Goede, USA (ret.)
Captain Arthur Clark Bivens, USN (ret.)
Lt. Colonel John K. Rieth, USA (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Clarence R. Meltesen, USA (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Brian Birdwell, USA (ret.)
Major Lee Basnar, USA (ret.)
Major Lewis Allen Lambert, USAF (ret.)
Major Jim Stroup, USMC (ret.)
Captain Robert Timberg, USMC (ret.)
Captain Harold Wade, USAF (ret.)

The Website now lists 699 servicemembers and their 2328 books.

MORE INFORMATION
Military Books

This information was sponsored by
Criminal Justice Books information online.

Military Books

Military-Writers.com is pleased to announce the addition of these servicemembers to the website:

Lieutenant General Harold G. Moore, USA (ret.)
Brigadier General Edmund L. Dubois, USA (ret.)
Colonel Garnett C. Brown, Jr., USAF (ret.)
Colonel Albert C. Smith, USMC (ret.)
Colonel Alex A. Vardamis, USA (ret.)
Colonel Albert S. J. Tucker, USA (ret.)
Colonel Jerry Crews, USA (ret.)
Captain Peter A. Huchthausen, USN (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Jud McLester, USAF (ret.)
Lt. Colonel James H. Willbanks, USA (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Frank E. Roberts, USA (ret.)
Commander Roger Paul Huff, USN (ret.)
Commander Allan Forst Geimer, USN (ret.)
Commander Ray C. Oman, USN (ret.)
Lieutenant Commander Carl V. Smith, USN (ret.)
Chief Warrant Officer William Arket, USA (ret.)

The Website now lists 687 servicemembers and their 2308 books.

MORE INFORMATION
Military Books

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Forensic Science information online.

Canadian Armed Forces Blogger: NATO awaits new leadership

Canadian Armed Forces Blogger: NATO awaits new leadership

Saturday, December 27, 2008

Overview of Military Conflict

The history of humankind is replete with accounts of social and military conflict, and archeological and anthropological research indicates that organized, armed conflict occurred well before the age in which there were written records. Military Conflict in various forms has occurred so often in the past that periods of peace are counted as notable exceptions to the normal state of affairs. War, military and naval campaigns, battles, combat, insurrections, terrorism, duels, and other forms of military conflict are mentioned frequently in most general histories recording social, economic, and political events and are the subject of many specialized histories. Military Conflict, it seems, is endemic to humankind and for thousands of years has had much to do with the rise and fall of tribes, cultures, empires, and nations.

Many explanations have been offered for this condition. Much effort and resources have gone into waging war, and substantial mental effort and research have gone into studying war. The strategy and tactics of war, campaigns, and battles have been the subjects of observation, generalization, speculation, and analysis ever since humans started fighting each other in an organized manner. Literature has many anecdotes, personal accounts, philosophical treatises, and prescriptive essays on military conflict. Many works are sufficiently general to be applied after the fact or ambiguous enough to rationalize whatever a particular commander wants to do. Some works, particularly those written by the victors, reflect significant biases. Other works are excellent descriptions but uncertain prescriptions. Still others present analytical or mathematical descriptions of
military conflict that are definite, numerical, and often incompatible with experience. There are many explanations of military conflict but not very much agreement on the underlying principles and causative factors -- this underlies the work of TMCI.

One reason for lack of agreement about
military conflict is that applying the scientific method of analysis is particularly difficult. Many natural phenomena can be observed and replicated in experiments to help establish cause and effect relationships. However, the most important military conflict phenomena cannot be replicated for experimental purposes, and data are available only from the historical record, which is intermittent and often inaccurate. Military conflict is a human endeavor - perhaps the most complex and challenging human endeavor - and it is therefore not entirely susceptible to the scientific method. One result of the uneven application of scientific method to military conflict has been an array of mathematical models that quantify and relate the physical aspects of conflict but imprecisely represent the human aspects. On the other hand, there is also a body of knowledge from history and the social sciences that describes conflict in human terms but tends to ignore or misinterpret the physical aspects.

A generally accepted conceptual framework, terminology, and approach for addressing Military Conflict is essential for understanding and dealing with this particular set of complex phenomena. Other fields of study, such as psychology, sociology, economics, political science, biochemistry, and physics, have generally accepted conceptual frameworks within which differences can be considered rationally and similarities appreciated. After five thousand years of human and
military history, there ought to be a general theory or framework for the systematic, scientific, study of military conflict.

READ ON
http://www.militaryconflict.org/Overview%20of%20MC.htm

Friday, December 26, 2008

Military Books

Military-Writers.com is pleased to announce the addition of these servicemembers to the website:

Brigadier General George Macon Shuffer, Jr., USA (ret.)
Captain Charles W. Rush, USN (ret.)
Colonel Charles W. Rush, USAF (ret.)
Colonel Ralph Wetterhahn, USAF (ret.)
Commander Roderick Burtram, USN (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Nelson O. Ottenhausen, USAF (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Joseph D. Posz, USA (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Thomas Jackson Slaybaugh, USAF (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Nathaniel “Ted” Colby, USA (ret.)
Major Ralph H. Wandrey, USAF (ret.)
Captain Bernard W. Peterson, USMC (ret.)
Lieutenant Junior Grade James E. Vaughan, USN (ret.)

The Website now lists 671 servicemembers and their 2271 books.

MORE INFORMATION
Military Books

This information was sponsored by
Military Leadership information online.

Thursday, December 25, 2008

Military Books

Military-Writers.com is pleased to announce the addition of these servicemembers to the website:

Major General Charlie Cooper, USAF (ret.)
Colonel Otis Hays, Jr., USA (ret.)
Colonel Gene P. Abel, USA (ret.)
Colonel John Schlight, USAF (ret.)
Colonel John E. Krebs, USA (ret.)
Colonel Jeffery M. Freeman, USA (ret.)
Colonel William M. Frash, USMC (ret.)
Commander Stephen Flynn, USCG (ret.)
Lt. Colonel William K. Emerson, USA (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Glenn G. Boyer, USAF (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Gordon Cucullu, USA (ret.)
Lt. Colonel William F. Otten, Jr., USAF (ret.)
Lt. Colonel David A Grossman, USA (ret.)
Commander Royal W. Connell, USN (ret.)
Captain Skip Allen, USAF (ret.)
Phillip Vannatter, USA

The Website now lists 659 servicemembers and their 2248 books.

MORE INFORMATION
Military Books

This information was sponsored by
Business Leadership information online.

Face of Defense: Airman Designs White House Christmas Tree Ornament

By Air Force Tech. Sgt. Luke Johnson
Special to American Forces Press Service

Dec. 24, 2008 - A reservist with the 940th Air Refueling Wing here was selected by California's 2nd district congressman and the 9th Reconnaissance Wing commander to design an ornament for the White House Christmas tree. The theme for this year's White House Christmas celebration is "Red, White and Blue Christmas," and the ornaments featured on the tree were decorated by artists around the country to represent the unique patriotic spirit of each artist's state.

Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Stuart Bisland designed the "Team Beale" ornament for the White House Christmas tree. At the request of first lady Laura Bush, Bisland was present for the unveiling of the tree.

"Back in September, I was contacted by Brig. Gen. Robert Otto and his staff and asked to paint the White House ornament," Bisland said. "They asked me to depict the emerging intelligence missions we perform at Beale
Air Force Base."

On one side of the ornament is the curvature of the Earth, space and the moon, with an RQ-4 Global Hawk flying on the edge of the atmosphere and a satellite in the distance.

On the other side of the ornament is a U-2 "Dragon Lady" flying through lightning with the Sutter Buttes in the background. The ornament also features the Team Beale logo surrounded by new and old
Air Force insignia.

The chief also managed to include a personal touch to the ornament.

"In dedication to my late father, Richard Bisland, a Grumman aerospace lunar module engineer, I airbrushed a very small gold lunar module launching from the moon," Bisland said.

The experience and the opportunity to represent Beale and the
Air Force at the unveiling of the White House Christmas tree was overwhelming, Bislund said.

"What makes this tree so special is that every inch of the 20-foot Fraser fir [from
North Carolina] is decorated with red, white and blue decorations and the ornaments painted for Mrs. Bush and our congressmen," he said. "Standing in its presence, you get a real sense of the honor to be a chosen artist for your state. This was quite an experience, and I was proud to represent the 9th RW, the Air Force Reserve, the 940th ARW and all of the airmen of Beale."

(
Air Force Tech. Sgt. Luke Johnson serves in the 940th Air Refueling Wing public affairs office.)

Wednesday, December 24, 2008

Civilian Orthopedic Surgeon Witnesses Servicemembers' Sacrifices Firsthand

By Navy Lt. Jennifer Cragg
Special to American Forces Press Service

Dec. 24, 2008 - A civilian orthopedic surgeon who has seen servicemembers' sacrifices firsthand said he believes the nation owes them a debt of gratitude, and that he'll bring techniques he saw in the military health system to his own practice. "I firmly believe as citizens we owe [our troops] great thanks," said Dr. Brendan M. Patterson, chairman of the orthopedic surgery department at MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland. Patterson returned in mid-December from Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany after completing the two-week Distinguished Visiting Scholar Program.

Patterson is the 18th scholar to participate in this program since its inception in July 2007.

"We live in an extraordinary country at a critical time in history, and there are a select few members who serve in the military who are on a daily basis are making significant sacrifices of time with their family and loved ones particularly this time of year to protect the interests of the majority," Patterson said yesterday during a "Dot Mil Docs" interview on
BlogTalkRadio.com.

The chairman of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association and co-director of Orthopaedic Trauma at Rhode Island Hospital in Providence, retired
Army Col. (Dr.) Roman Hayda, said the program was established to provide a link between the civilian and military orthopedic communities.

"The scholars have at least 10 years of trauma experience with demonstrated
leadership and dedication to teaching," Hayda said. "They provide some assistance to the experienced military surgeons at Landstuhl while being able to more fully appreciate the complexity of injuries experienced by our servicemembers."

Hayda said scholars volunteer for the service by contacting the Orthopaedic Trauma Association and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

"The selection is then based on a review of their credentials with a panel of tri-service military members, to include a representative from [Landstuhl] and a civilian board member," he explained.

Patterson said his two-week visit to Landstuhl was an opportunity he would be unlikely to have in the civilian sector.

"I don't think experience in a civilian center can prepare one for the type of injuries that these young soldiers experience," he said. "The modern warfare has brought with it the improvised explosive device, which has really dramatically altered the character of injures experienced by people in combat, and the concentration of a blast force on the extremities is truly a different type of injury."

Patterson said he gained a new respect for the orthopedic surgeons he worked with in Landstuhl.

"The orthopedic surgeons are an outstanding group at Landstuhl, and we were able to do a few cases together where some of the soft-tissue techniques are used in civilian trauma centers to cover exposed bone and exposed surfaces," he said. "We were able to use a few techniques mobilizing muscle and putting some traction on some skin that would salvage [or] save some length of a particular injured extremity."

He said he would bring some other techniques witnessed at Landstuhl back to his practice.

"Some of the treatments, particularly with the management of contaminated open wounds, use some of the time-honored approaches of allowing the body some time to respond and not rushing a closure that would potentially lead to an infection," he said. "I think that is one piece [that I will] bring back.

"The other is the commitment to pain management," he continued. "There is a lot of time and effort expended on regional anesthesia. Putting in blocks so that they can make an entire extremity numb to relieve their suffering and pain is quite extraordinary."

Patterson said he was impressed by the screening tests for traumatic brain injury.

"The military has done an incredible job in looking for traumatic brain injury," he said. "Everyone at Landstuhl had a screening test for traumatic brain injury that identified those patients who may have suffered some degree of concussive or head injury. The military medical system has really done a good amount of work on making sure those screening tests are done on every soldier."

(
Navy Lt. Jennifer Cragg serves in the New Media directorate of the Defense Media Activity.)

MILITARY CONTRACTS December 24, 2008

Air Force

The
Air Force awarded a contract to Boeing Satellite Systems, Inc., El Segundo, California for $75,000,000. This will authorize Boeing to continue the Transformational Communications Satellite Risk Reduction and System Definition (RR&SD) baseline efforts. (FA8808-04-C-0022/P00052).

The
Air Force awarded a contract to Lockheed Martin Space Systems Corporation, Sunnyvale, California for 75,000,000. This will authorize Lockheed Martin to continue the Transformational Communications Satellite (TSAT) Risk Reduction and System Definition (RR&SD) baseline efforts. (FA8808-04-C-0023/P00053)

Army

Hawker Beechcraft Corporation,
Wichita, Kan., was awarded on Dec 19, 2008, a $12,697,384 firm/fixed/price contract for the purchase of 2 each Hawker Beechcraft Super King Air Model 350 aircrafts. Work will be performed in Ozark, Ala., with an estimated completion date of Jul 31, 2009. One bid was solicited and one bid received. U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-09-C-0087).

General Dynamics-Armament and Technical Products, Burlington, Vt., was awarded on Dec 22, 2008 a $20,058,654.50 firm/fixed/price contract to Load, Assemble and Pack (LAP) of 155mm M231 and M232A1 Modular Artillery Charge System (MACS) propelling charge increments. Work will be performed in Hampton, Ariz., with an estimated completion date of Sept 5, 2009. Bids were solicited on the Web with two bids received. Joint Munitions & Lethality Contracting Center, Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., is the contracting activity (W15QKN-09-C-0046).

The Boeing Company, Ridley Park, Pa., was awarded on Dec 19, 2008, a $620,744,955 firm/fixed/price contract for CH-47F Multiyear contract for second year Production Lot 7, 16 each CH-47F new build aircraft, 15 each CH-47F remanufacture aircraft, over and above, Production Lot 8 Long Lead Items. Work will be performed in Ridley Park, Pa., with an estimated completion date of Sept 30, 2013. One bid was solicited and one bid received. U.S.
Army Aviation and Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (w58rgz-08-c-0098).

Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems, El Segundo, Ca. was awarded on Dec 19, 2008, a $10,668,899 Cost Price Firm Fixed contract for Research: This program relates to the TRUST in Integrated Circuits (TIC) program to advance science and technology for ensuring integrated circuits (IC) can be trusted regardless of their origin and fabrication process. In Phase II (the subject of this announcement), Raytheon will refine their techniques to protect all stages of the Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) design process. Work will be performed in El Segundo and
San Jose, Ca.; Lexington, Mass.; Nashua, N.H.; and Albuquerque, N.M.; with an estimated completion date of Dec 22, 2009. Bids were solicited by a broad agency announcement with 29 bids received. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Arlington, Va., is the contracting activity (HR0011-08-C-0005).

Johns Hopkins University – Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md., was awarded on Dec 19, 2008 a $8,370,480 Cost Plus Fixed – Fee contract for Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab to participate in the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency Chemical Sensor Program. Work will be performed in Laurel, Md., and Stillwater, Okla., with an estimated completion date of May 18, 2011. Bids were solicited on the Web with two bids received. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Arlington, Va., is the contracting activity (HR0011-09-C-0029).

Rolls Royce Corporation,
Indianapolis, Ind., was awarded on Dec 19, 2008 a $32,503,995 firm/fixed/price five-year contract for the Delivery Order to exercise Calendar Year (CY) 09 Option on the Model 250-C30R/3 engines Contractor Logistics Support contract. Delivery Order 0004 contains Contract Line Item Numbers CLINs 0001 (Contractor Field Service Representative), CLIN 4004 (Engineering/Program Management Support), CLIN 5001 (Engine/Component/Part/Repair Overhaul) and CLIN 7001 (Power-By-The Hour Rate per Flight Hour). This contract performance period ends Dec 31, 2008. Work will be performed in Indianapolis, Ind., with an estimated completion date of Dec 31, 2010. One bid was solicited and one bid received. U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-06-D0072).

Raytheon Missile Systems Company, Tucson, Ariz., was awarded on Dec 19, 2008 a firm/fixed/price with cost/plus/fixed/fee line items contract for Griffin munitions and engineering services. Work will be performed in Tucson, Ariz., with an estimated completion date of Aug 31, 2009. One bid was solicited and one bid received. U.S.
Army Contracting Command, Aviation and Missile Contracting Center, Redstone Arsenal, is the contracting activity (W31P4Q-08-C-0252).

Luna Innovations, Inc., Roanoke, Va., was awarded on Dec 19, 2008 a $6,173,760 Cost Plus Fixed Fee contract for Research: Luna Innovations will develop an independent suite of tools to verify that Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) bit streams can be TRUSTed and contain only that functionality specified in the design implementation: nothing more and nothing less. They will also develop tools to authenticate that the target FPGA hardware platform has not been substituted within the supply chain. Work will be performed in Roanoke, Va., with an estimated completion date of Dec 19, 2008. Bids were solicited by Broad Agency Announcement with 30 bids received. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Arlington, Va., is the contracting activity (HR0011-08-C-0007).

Laser Shot, Inc., Stafford, Texas, was awarded on Dec 19, 2008 a $10,764,066 Primarily Firm Fixed Price/with Time & Material CLINs for travel contract for procurement of a personal computer (PC) game based training solution, a first person shooter that leverages commercial or government off-the-shelf (COTS/GOTS) products. Procurement includes delivery of game-based training software with an
Army-wide license, integration of the software on Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) PCs, fielding, New Equipment Training, web portal development and technical support. Work will be performed in Orlando, Fla., with an estimated completion date of Dec 31, 2012.Bids were solicited on the Web with two bids received. Program Executive Office, Simulation, Training and Instrumentation, Orlando, Fla., is the contracting activity (W900KK-09-C-0009).

Q.B.S., Inc., Alliance, Ohio, was awarded on Dec 19, 2008 a $10,811,000 firm/fixed contract to design and construct Company Operations Facilities (COF), approximately 54,000 square feet for the 82nd Airborne Division. Primary facilities consist of Readiness Module (4) and Administrative Module, Covered Hardstand and parking. Project also includes all infrastructure and utilities. Work is to be performed at Fort Bragg, N.C., with an estimated completion date of Sep 30, 2010. Four proposals were solicited and three proposals received. U.S.
Army Engineer District, Savannah, Ga., is the contracting activity (W912HN-08-D-0038).

Thales-Raytheon Systems Company LLC,
Fullerton, Ca., was awarded on Dec 19, 2008 $19,068,741 a firm/fixed/price 3 year IDIQ contract for award of a production buy for spare parts to support AN/TPQ-36(V) and AN/TPQ-37(V) FIREFINDER Radar Systems. Work is to be performed in Fullerton, Ca. with an estimated completion date of June 30, 2012. Bids were solicited by sole source (1) with one bid received. CECOM Acquisition Center, Fort Monmouth, N.J., is the contracting activity (W15P7T-06-D-T001).

General Dynamics Land Systems, Sterling Heights, Mich., was awarded on Dec 23, 2008 a $6,995,634.10 firm/fixed/price contract for 130 each display, Optoelectro also known as Improved Driver's Integrated Display with Containers. Work is to be performed in Tallahassee, Fla., with an estimated completion date of Dec 30, 2011. One bid was solicited and one bid received. Tank and Automotive Command, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W52H09-07-G-0001).

Archer Western Contractors,
Baltimore, Md., was awarded on Dec 23, 2008 a $88,893,929 firm/fixed/price contract to design and construct a standard design unaccompanied enlisted personnel housing complex consisting of two 6-story 222-Person barracks building (174,000 square feet); one 6-story 228-Person barracks (149,000 square feet) and 8 Company Operation Facility (COFs) (readiness module, administrative module, covered hardstand, troop aid station). Facilities systems included fire alarm, detection, and reporting systems, automatic building fire sprinklers; energy monitoring and control system (EMCS) system with connections to central monitoring location, and intrusion detection system; interior communications, and building information systems; and force protection measures. Supporting facilities include utilities, fire protection and alarm systems, paving, walks, curbs and gutters, traffic signage, storm drainage including underground storm water retention, erosion control measures, information systems, landscaping, and site improvements. Work is to be performed at Fort Bragg, N.C., with an estimated completion date of Mar 31, 2010. Four proposals were solicited and three bids received. U.S. Army Engineer District, Savannah, Ga., is the contracting activity (W912HN-07-D-0051).

Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation, Stratford, Conn., was awarded on Dec 23, 2008 an $84,988,629 firm/fixed/price contract to exercise option for six (6) Navy MH-60R Helicopters. Work is to be performed in Stratford, Conn., with an estimated completion date of Dec 31, 2012. One bid was solicited and one bid received. U.S.
Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-08-C-0003).

Lockheed Martin Corp, Missiles and
fire Control – Dallas, Grand Prairie, Texas, was awarded on Dec 23, 2008 a $774,776,167 firm/fixed/price (FFP) and cost/plus/fixed/fee (CPFF) contract for PATRIOT Advanced Capability – 3 (PAC-3) FY09 Production Buy which consists of 188 Missiles, Tooling, Parts Library, Storage and Aging, Interim Contractor Depot Support, Concurrent Spares and Replenishment Spares. Work is to be performed in Grand Prairie and Lufkin, Texas: Camden, Ark.; Chelmsford, Mass.; Orlando and Ocala, Fla., with an estimated completion date of July 31, 2010. One bid was solicited and one bid received. U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal is the contracting activity (W31P4Q-09-C-0002).