Military News

Friday, July 31, 2009

MILITARY CONTRACTS July 31, 2009

ARMY
Oshkosh Corp., Oshkosh, Wis., was awarded on Jul. 31, 2009 a $1,063,700,000 firm-fixed-price for 1,700 Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) All Terrain Vehicles (M-ATV's), Field Service Representative Support, and associated parts support packages to include Authorized Stockage Lists (ASL), Prescribed Load List (PLL), Reprocessing Spares, Battle Damage Repair parts (BDR) and Basic Issue Items (BII). Work is to be performed in McConnellsburg, Pa., with an estimated completion date of Jul. 31, 2010. U.S. Army TACOM LCMC, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-09-D-0111).

NAVY
Oshkosh Corp., Oshkosh, Wis., is being awarded a $1,064,463,100 firm-fixed-priced delivery order #0002 modification 02 under previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract W56HZV-09-D-0111 to exercise an option for 1,700 Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) All Terrain Vehicles (M-ATVs), Field Service Representative Support, and associated parts support packages to include Authorized Stockage Lists (ASL), Prescribed Load Lists (PLL), Deprocessing Spares, Battle Damage Repair parts (BDR) and Basic Issue Items (BII). Vehicles and parts support packages will be fielded to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Field Service Representatives will be providing support in Kuwait and Afghanistan. This order is for Marine Corps, Army, Special Operations Command and some test vehicles. Work will be performed in McConnellsburg, Pa., and work is expected to be completed by Jul. 31, 2010. Contract funds in the amount of $15,000,000 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The US Army TACOM Life Cycle Management Command, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity.

AMEC-Nan Joint Venture, LLC, Honolulu, Hawaii, (N62742-09-D-1171); dck/TtEC, LLC, Honolulu, Hawaii (N62742-09-D-1172); Environmental Chemical Corp., Burlingame, Calif., (N62742-09-D-1173); and URS Group, Inc., San Antonio, Texas (N62742-09-D-1174), are being awarded a cost reimbursement and firm-fixed price with award fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple award construction contract for construction projects at DOD installations worldwide. The work to be performed provides for new construction, repair, and renovation projects at various DOD installations worldwide. Types of projects include, but are not limited to: new construction, repair, demolition, and renovation including utilities and waterfront work, and construction of medical facilities (hospitals, medical clinics, and/or dental clinics). Work may also include energy and water conservation projects. The maximum dollar value for all four contracts combined is $900,000,000. Work will be performed at various DOD installations worldwide, and work is expected to be completed July 2014. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online with 10 proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Pacific, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is the contracting activity.

Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Inc., Newport News, Va., is being awarded a $49,940,340 modification to previously awarded contract (N62793-03-G-0001) for modernization, ship alterations, repairs, maintenance, and deferred work on board the USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) during the Post Shakedown Availability (PSA)/Selected Restricted Availability (SRA). Work will be performed in Newport News, Va., and is expected to be completed by December 2009. Contract funds in the amount of $30,726,718 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair, Newport News, Va., is the contracting activity.

Mid Eastern Builders, Inc., Chesapeake, Va., is being awarded a $36,371,486 firm-fixed-price contract for replacement of fuel storage tanks at Craney Island Fuel Terminal. The work to be performed provides for the demolition of nineteen aged bulk storage tanks and the construction of six new tanks. Work will be performed in Portsmouth, Va., and is expected to be completed by August 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website, with six proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (N40085-09-C-5037).

General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems, Fairfax, Va., is being awarded a $21,317,709 cost-plus-incentive-fee contract for engineering services in support of the AN/BYG-1 Tactical Control System. The 228,000 engineering service hours will be used to migrate the AN/BYG-1 Tactical Control System from a Technology Insertion (TI-08) baseline to a TI-10 baseline and integrate Advanced Processing Build (APB-09) and deliver this capability to multiple variants to be delivered to multiple submarine platforms. Work will be performed in Fairfax, Va., (58.6 percent); Middleton, R.I., (26 percent); Fairfax Station, Va., (4 percent); San Diego, Calif., (3.4 percent); Hampton, Va., (2.2 percent); McLean, Va., (1.8 percent); Shoreview, Minn. (1.3 percent); Brigham City, Utah (1 percent); Manassas, Va. (1 percent); Greensboro, N.C. (.5 percent); Arlington, Va. (.1 percent); Breaverton, Ore. (.1 percent), and is expected to be completed by July 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured with three proposals solicited and three offers received via the Federal Business Opportunities. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00024-09-C-6250).

Clayco, Inc., Livonia, Mich., is being awarded a $19,475,000 firm-fixed price contract for design and construction of two dining facilities at Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune. The contract also contains two unexercised options, which if exercised would increase cumulative contract value to $22,076,412. Work will be performed in Jacksonville, N.C., and is expected to be completed by April 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website, with six proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Mid Atlantic, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (N40085-09-C-3210).

Complex Solutions, Inc., Kailua, Hawaii, is being awarded an $18,511,475 time and materials, indefinite-delivery modification to previously awarded contract (N00244-07-D-0035) to exercise option year two for technical and educational support services to the Naval Postgraduate School's Center for Civil Military Relations education and training program. Work will be performed at Monterey, Calif., (6 percent); Kailua, Hawaii or Huntsville, Ala., (4 percent); Army posts around the United States (17 percent); and various locations outside the continental United States (73 percent), and work is expected to be completed by July 2010. Contract funds will not expire before the end of the current fiscal year. This announcement includes efforts for the Governments of Austria, Egypt and Singapore (less than 1 percent each) under the Foreign Military Sales Program. This contract was awarded competitively through Navy Electronic Commerce Online website, with two offers received. The Fleet and Industrial Supply Center San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity.

General Microwave, D/B/A Herley Farmingdale, Farmingdale, N.Y., is being awarded a $16,610,728 firm-fixed-price, time and material, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for 450 Radio Frequency (RF) Module units including engineering, technical and repair support services for the U.S Navy, Air Force, and Army. Work will be performed in Jerusalem, Israel, and is expected to be completed in July 2014. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured through an electronic request for proposals and two offers were received. The Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake, Calif., is the contracting activity (N68936-09-D-0046).

Space Ground Systems Solutions, Inc., Melbourne, Fla., is being awarded a $10,929,037 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for Spacecraft Engineering, Software Research, Development and Support for design, development, test, launch and mission operations of Department of Defense assets. This is a new requirement for highly-skilled personnel to support the Navy space programs development, enhancement, testing and configuration management of a collection of software, which is constantly being enhanced to provide state of the art solutions to space applications. This contract contains options, which if exercised, will bring the total cumulative value of the contract to $57,978,456. Work will be performed at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C., and is expected to be completed July 2010 (July 2014 with options exercised). Contract funds in the amount of $152,500 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured under Request for Proposal (N000173-08-R-SER02), with two offer received. The Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00173-09-C-6001).

Group W Inc.,* Fairfax, Va., is being awarded a $10,747,352 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the procurement of analytical support services for the Combined Forces Command (CFC) and United States Forces Korea (USFK) Operations Analysis Branch/CJ35 Plans Division. This analytical support covers a wide range of analytical, data development, post-processor, joint interface, and collaborative analysis and exercise/war gaming support requirements for the Commander, CFC/USFK. Work will be performed in Korea, and is expected to be completed by July 2014. Contract funds in the amount of $1,209,562 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online and Federal Business Opportunities websites, with three proposals solicited and three offers. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head, Md., is the contracting activity (N00174-09-C-0028).

AMEC-Nan Joint Venture, LLC, Honolulu, Hawaii, is being awarded a $9,643,900 firm-fixed-price award fee task order #0001 under a previously awarded Global Multiple-Award Construction contract (N62742-09-D-1171) for a Child Development Center located at Marine Corps Base Hawaii. Funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Work will be performed in Kaneohe, Hawaii, and is expected to be completed by January 2010. The funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This task order was competitively procured with ten proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Pacific, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is the contracting activity (N62742-09-D-1171).

Lockheed Martin, Maritime Systems & Sensors, Moorestown, N.J., is being awarded an $8,132,702 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-07-C-5101) for updated Aegis computer program maintenance effort in support of the Norwegian Fridtjof Nansen (F310) Class Frigates. This contract provides a limited in-service support program for the Norwegian New Frigate (NNF) SPY-1F derived Aegis Weapon System (NF-AWS) computer program procured under NAVSEA Contract N00024-00-C-5147. This contract will assist Norway in the maintenance of its NF-AWS which recently underwent a successful Aegis Combat System Ship Qualification Trial. Work will be performed in Moorestown, N.J., and is expected to be completed by December 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Pioneer Contracting Co., Ltd.*, Wahiawa, Hawaii, is being awarded $7,324,060 for firm-fixed-price task order #0002 under a previously awarded multiple award construction contract (N62478-08-D-4011) for construction to repair and renovate Building 503 at Marine Corps Base Hawaii. Work to provide for the replacement of deteriorated windows with metal framed anti-terrorism force protection compliant windows; re-roofing of the building; upgrading the existing fire alarm systems; providing a fire suppression system; exterior repairs to include replacing exterior doors; exterior painting; interior repairs to include replacement of floor coverings and ceilings at common areas; painting; replacement of bathroom and toilet fixtures; and proper fire exiting configuration at the stairs and corridors to comply with life/safety codes. Work will be performed in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, and is expected to be completed by April 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Three proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Hawaii, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is the contracting activity. The work to be performed provides for all design, construction to repair and renovate Building 503 at Marine Corps Base Hawaii. Work to provide for the replacement of deteriorated windows with metal framed anti-terrorism force protection compliant windows; re-roofing of the building; upgrading the existing fire alarm systems; providing a fire suppression system; exterior repairs to include replacing exterior doors; exterior painting; interior repairs to include replacement of floor coverings and ceilings at common areas; painting; replacement of bathroom and toilet fixtures; and proper fire exiting configuration at the stairs and corridors to comply with life/safety codes.

Northrop Grumman Technical Services Sector, Herndon, Va., is being awarded a $7,007,705 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee, firm-fixed-price contract (N00421-08-C-0065) to exercise an option for approximately 89,886 hours of engineering and logistics services in support of E-2C, C-2A test and E-2D System Design and Development (SDD) aircraft located at the Air Test and Evaluation Squadron TWO ZERO (VX-20), Patuxent River, Md. Services to be provided include modification and preparation of the aircraft for test operations, correction of safety of flight discrepancies, quality control inspections, engineering investigations, and logistics and parts support. Work will be performed in Patuxent River, Md., and is expected to be completed in July 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY
Universal Sodexho, Tacoma, Wash., is being awarded a maximum $180,000,000 fixed-price with economic price adjustment, indefinite- delivery and indefinite-quantity, maintenance, repair, and operations prime vendor contract. There are no other locations of performance. Using services are Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Federal Civilian Agencies. The proposal was originally Web solicited with four responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract is exercising the third option year period. The date of performance completion is July 31, 2010. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia (DSCP), Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM500-05-D-BP07).

Valero Marketing & Supply Co., San Antonio, Texas is being awarded a maximum $28,598,990 fixed-price with economic price adjustment, indefinite-delivery and indefinite-quantity contract for fuel. Other location of performance is in Corpus Christi, Texas. Using service is Foreign Military Sales, Israel. The proposal was originally Web solicited with three responses. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is October 31, 2009. The contracting activity is the Defense Energy Support Center (DESC), Fort Belvoir, Va., (SP0600-08-D-0454).

Science Applications International Corp., Fairfield, N.J., is being awarded a maximum $26,818,289 firm-fixed price, sole source contract for axle assembly parts. Other locations of performance are in Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. Using service is Marine Corps. The proposal was originally Web solicited with two responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is June 28, 2010. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency, Warren (DSCC-ZG), Warren, Mich., (SPRDL1-09-C-0126).

Woodward HRT, Inc., Valencia, Calif., is being awarded a maximum $15,328,968 firm fixed price, sole source, requirements type contract for parts. There are no other locations of performance. Using services are Army, Navy and Air Force. The proposal was originally DIBBS solicited with one response. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract contains a one year base with four one-year option periods. The date of performance completion is August 3, 2010. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Richmond (DSCR), Richmond, Va., (SPM4A2-09-D-0029).

AIR FORCE
McDonnell Douglass Corp., Long Beach, Calif., was awarded a $64,400,000 modified contract to the C-17 Globemaster III Sustainment Partnership contract to incorporate the sustainment support for two Qatar Emiri Air Force C-17 aircraft for FY09-11. At this time, $6,678,700 has been obligated. MSWE/516 AESG/PK, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8614-04-V-2004).

Boeing Co., Wichita, Kansas, was awarded a $70,592,076 modified contract to provide for new communication and data management updates to the B-52H Air Frame. At this time, $4,372,000 has been obligated. 651 AESS/SYK, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity (FA8107-05-C-0001 P00037).

Lockheed Martin Corp., Space Systems Co., Sunnyvale, Calif., was awarded a $20,000,000 modified contract for the Advanced Extremely High Frequency Satellite and will study the technology necessary to potentially support future enhancements to the AEHF system. At this time, no funding has been obligated. Air Force Space & Missile Systems Center, Military Satellite Communications Systems Wing, El Segundo, Calif., is the contracting activity (F04701-02-C-0002).

Honeywell International, Inc., Defense & Space Electronic Systems, Clearwater, Fla., was award a $9,744,953 modified contract for 126 Embedded GPS/Inertial Navigation System Production Units for the U.S. Army CH47F, P31 EGI +429 SAASM and AH64. At this time, the entire amount has been obligated. 647 AESS/PK, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity (F8626-06-C-2065).

Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio, was awarded a $8,757,992 modified contract to conduct in vitro screening studies to identify active chemicals and select active candidates for efficacy and nonclinical safety testing. At this time, $465,394 has been obligated. 55 Contracting Squadron, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., is the contracting activity (SP0700-00-D-3180).

Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio was awarded a $8,741,664 modified contract to conduct analyses to support continued research and development of oximes intended for replacement of 2-PAM. At this time, $579,710 has been obligated. 55 Contracting Squadron, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., is the contracting activity (SP0700-00-D-3180).

Northrop-Grumman Space and Mission Systems, Clearfield, Utah, was awarded a $7,930,219 modified contract to provide Minuteman Enhancement Reliability Accelerometer engineering and feasibility study. At this time, the entire amount has been obligated. 526th ICBMSG/PKE, Hill Air Force Base, is the contracting activity (F42610-98-C-0001).

Navy Task Force Assesses Changing Climate

By Bob Freeman
Special to American Forces Press Service

July 31, 2009 - Rapidly diminishing sea ice, melting glaciers, rising sea levels, increased storm severity -- all are possible consequences of a climate that mounting evidence suggests is changing significantly. As the scientific community works to understand the changing climate, the chief of naval operations has created a task force, headed by Rear Adm. David Titley, the Navy's senior oceanographer, to better understand and evaluate its implications for maritime security.

"Task Force Climate Change was initiated ... to assess the Navy's preparedness to respond to emerging requirements, and to develop a science-based timeline for future Navy actions regarding climate change," Titley explained in a July 28 interview on Pentagon Web Radio's audio webcast "Armed with Science: Research and Applications for the Modern Military."

"Because the Arctic is changing faster than any other place on the planet, our first deliverable will be a strategic roadmap proposing actions for the Navy regarding the Arctic region," Titley said.

This may include an assessment of how maritime strategy applies to the Arctic region, potential improvements in infrastructure, and recommended investments in force structure and capabilities to prepare for the challenges presented by the changing climate, he explained.

Titley was interviewed while staying in Barrow, Alaska, the northernmost city in the United States, located 350 miles north of the Arctic Circle, where he was joining Rear Adm. Nevin Carr, chief of naval research, for a visit to the Coast Guard Cutter Healy, an icebreaker supporting scientific research in the Arctic Ocean. The visit was intended to observe retrieval of several bottom-moored buoy sensors funded by the Office of Naval Research.

"Observations from these buoys will give us a better science-based and fact-based understanding of what is going on in the Arctic," Titley explained.

Global climate change may present many challenges to national security, Titley said. Rising sea levels from the melting of glacial and sea ice are of specific interest to the Navy due to the coastal location of many of its bases. "We need to understand what it will take to protect these valuable investments," he said.

Increasing ocean temperatures may compound the problem. "As the ocean temperature warms, thermal expansion may be a significant ... and under-estimated component of sea level rise," Titley commented.

"We are also very interested in the distribution of extreme weather events," Titley said, explaining that while the mean global temperature may be rising, some regions may experience extreme heating while others are seeing colder-than-normal temperatures.

Titley explained that changing ocean currents and precipitation patterns may produce regional droughts and floods that could have severe consequences for stressed and poor populations, who have the least ability to adapt to a quickly changing environment. "This could result in an increased potential for large-scale humanitarian assistance and disaster relief efforts," he noted.

The Arctic already is experiencing dramatic changes. "Since satellite observations began in 1979, we have seen a 40 percent decrease in perennial, or multiyear, sea ice," Titley said. This decline in sea ice, he added, is opening up the Arctic for more human activity, including resource exploration and ecotourism in the near term, and the potential for increased commercial shipping and fishing in the decades to come.

"As the climate changes and the sea lanes start to open, the United States Navy has a role to play in maritime security, working with our Coast Guard and international partners to ensure the sea lanes remain open and navigation is free for all," Titley said.

Titley discussed the intricate dynamics of ocean currents influencing the changes that are occurring in the Arctic. "The more I learn about the complex Arctic environment," he said, "the more I realize that we still have significant aspects of the basic oceanography to understand before we are going to be able to accurately forecast and model these interactions."

The Navy has a long history of polar operations, Titley noted, and the earliest indications of decreasing ice thickness were reported by Navy submarines in the 1990s. Since then, he added, the Navy has funded various scientific studies there in collaboration with other federal agencies and numerous partners in the world of academia and research.

Titley pointed out that another example of collaboration is the National Ice Center, a joint operation among the Navy, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Coast Guard. The center charts sea ice worldwide for safety of navigation and operations, and their measurements have been crucial to quantifying the changes that are occurring in the Arctic, he said.

Titley said the Navy has many assets that can assist in understanding the changing climate. From a wide array of data-gathering sensors and platforms to super-computing facilities that process the data and create predictions, Navy assets continuously work to provide comprehensive knowledge of the physical environment.

"The naval oceanography program exists to provide environmental information to the operating fleet, allowing it to operate more safely and effectively," Titley said.

"I like to say that we are operating in nature's casino; I intend to count the cards," he quipped.

(Bob Freeman works in the Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy.)

GI Bill Transferability Set to Begin

By Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael J. Carden
American Forces Press Service

July 31, 2009 - With the Post-9/11 GI Bill's option to transfer unused educational benefits to eligible family members taking effect tomorrow, it's no surprise that more than 25,000 servicemembers have pre-applied, a Pentagon official said today. The wave of applicants has far exceeded the Defense and Veterans Affairs departments' expectations, said Bob Clark, the Pentagon's assistant director for accessions policy.

What's even more impressive is that the Defense Department's Web site for requesting the benefit has been live only since June 29, he added.

"We've seen, roughly, a thousand applications a day for the past week or so, and we expect that to continue," Clark said. "Transferability of these educational benefits has been one of the most requested provisions by family support groups, family advocacy groups and the troops out in the field and fleet, and we're just happy that it starts on the first of August."

The site, https://www.dmdc.osd.mil/TEB/, is accessible using a common access card, Defense Department self-service user identification or a Defense Finance and Accounting Service personal identification number. Spouses and family members must be enrolled under their servicemember sponsor in the Defense Eligibility Enrollment Reporting System, also known as DEERS, to be eligible for the transfer benefit. Military members also can link to the site through http://www.defenselink.mil/gibill.

With the Post-9/11 GI Bill, servicemembers are eligible for 36 months of educational benefits -- the equivalent of four nine-month academic years. To qualify for the transfer benefit, servicemembers must have six years of service on active duty or in the Selected Reserve on or after Aug. 1 and commit to an additional four years of service.

Servicemembers have the option to use or transfer as much of their benefits as they want to, and they can revoke or redesignate who receives the benefit at any time, Clark said.

He added that servicemembers can add and change names only while on active duty, and not after separating or retiring from active-duty service.

The unused benefits can be transferred to a spouse, two children or any combination, he said. But children cannot start using the benefit until they're 18 or have a high school diploma or equivalent. Clark noted that children enrolled in DEERS lose their military benefits at age 21 unless they are full-time students.

Only eligible dependents' names will appear on the registration Web site, he explained. Once servicemembers register on the site and designate who the benefits will be transferred to, the application will be processed through their appropriate service branch.

After the service verifies eligibility to transfer the benefits, the application will be forwarded and processed again through VA. And finally, when the selected dependent decides to use the benefit, he or she must go to the Department of Veterans Affairs Web site and fill out an online application to request a certificate of eligibility, Clark said.

The certificate then can be taken to the school to be processed by its Veterans Affairs representative and used to request tuition, payment for books and the living stipend, which varies by institution and location, he continued.

Of the 25,000 who've already applied, more than 15,000 have been approved, and of those, 5,500 dependents already have requested certificates to start their education.

"It has been a very fast, long run-up to the first of August, which is upon us. I see this as a wonderful opportunity for our veterans, our servicemembers, in particular, the families of our career members to give them the opportunity to further their education and reach their dreams," Clark said.

Most servicemembers who have at least six years of military service as of Aug. 1 and agree to serve an additional four years qualify, he said. Department officials have proposed measures to support servicemembers who have at least 10 years of active service but can't serve the additional four because of service or department policy. They would, however, have to serve the maximum time allowed before separating from the military, he said.

Another provision will cover servicemembers who will reach the 20-year service mark, making them retirement-eligible, between Aug. 1, 2009, and Aug. 1, 2013.

Clark explained how servicemembers who complete 20 years of service will be able to transfer the benefits:

-- Those eligible for retirement on Aug. 1, 2009, will be eligible to transfer their benefits with no additional service requirement.

-- Those with an approved retirement date after Aug. 1, 2009, and before July 1, 2010, will qualify with no additional service.

-- Those eligible for retirement after Aug. 1, 2009, but before Aug. 1, 2010, will qualify with one additional year of service after approval to transfer their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits.

-- Those eligible for retirement between Aug. 1, 2010, and July 31, 2011, will qualify with two additional years of service after approval to transfer.

-- Those eligible to retire between Aug. 1, 2011, and July 31, 2012, will qualify with three additional years of service after approval to transfer.

Principles, Innovation Reveal Marines' Success, Petraeus Says

By John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service

July 31, 2009 - The secret to the U.S. Marine Corps' success is a blending of bedrock principles with innovation, the commander of U.S. Central Command said here last night. Using two examples from recent history -- the heroism of the last Marine Medal of Honor recipient and the turnaround in Iraq's Anbar province, -- Army Gen. David H. Petraeus shared his view at an event hosted by the Marine Association Foundation.

"On the one hand, Marines display a stalwart resistance to change in those bedrock values that form the very foundation of what it means to be Marine," he said. "On the other hand, Marines demonstrate a ready embrace of innovation that allows them to adapt to the environments in which they operate and to the enemies they face."

Some of those timeless, unchanging truths that describe the Marine Corps include an unflinching devotion to one's fellow Marines, a ready embrace of hardship and a universal emphasis on the skills and the spirit of the rifleman, he said.

Petraeus said these underlying principles are illustrated in the story of Marine Corps Cpl. Jason Dunham. In 2004, the 22-year-old Marine was killed in action in Karabilah, Iraq, when he used his body to cover a grenade and shield his fellow Marines from the ensuing blast.

Dunham became the 295th Marine to receive the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military decoration, which is bestowed for gallantry in action. The Navy will christen a ship named in the fallen Marine's honor -- the USS Jason Dunham -- next week during a ceremony at Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine.

Petraeus said the Marines' actions in Anbar province illustrate their ability to adapt their strategy to meet unique challenges.

In 2006, Anbar province was one of Iraq's most contentious regions. It was a society that had collapsed under the weight of an endemic insurgency with an infrastructure dilapidated by years of infighting and neglect. But amid the surge of U.S. forces in 2007, al-Qaida operatives overplayed their hands in Anbar, alienating local residents. Meanwhile, the influx of U.S. Marines helped to tamp down violence and create political breathing room, which in turn allowed the forging of key alliances between local tribal sheiks and coalition operators.

"As a result, sheiks started coming forward to coalition forces to discuss an alliance to throw off al-Qaida," Petraeus said. "And this was the opening we needed."

The "Anbar Awakening," a societal purging of extremism by Anbaris, and formation of a civilian security group known as "Sons of Iraq" ushered in a level of stability unprecedented since U.S. operations in Iraq began.

"It is not an exaggeration to say that the Anbar Awakening helped alter the course of events in Iraq," Petraeus said. "And I believe that generations from now, historians will continue to view it as a great example of the principled application of long-standing counterinsurgency principles."

Thursday, July 30, 2009

Turnover Pays Unforeseen Benefits, General Says

By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service

July 30, 2009 - The commander of Multinational Corps Iraq said an unanticipated result of the U.S.-Iraq security agreement is that relationships between Iraqi and U.S. commanders have improved. Army Lt. Gen. Charles H. Jacoby Jr. told reporters traveling with Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates this week that the improvement means better operations, better sharing of intelligence and better security for the Iraqi people.

The security agreement called for all American combat troops to be out of Iraqi cities and villages by June 30. American forces started pulling out of these areas in November, and Iraqi security forces took over the protection mission. American forces now are outside the cities and advise Iraqi commanders. They also are available if Iraqi forces need assistance.

Better cooperation between Iraqi and U.S. units has been an outgrowth -- and a pleasant surprise -- for all, Jacoby said. "The reason is the construct on 30 June is about Iraqi sovereignty and Iraqi security forces pridefully stepping up and providing security for their population," he said.

"U.S., coalition and Iraqi forces are really sitting down and sharing operations, sharing intelligence, and really working out tactics, techniques and procedures," the general continued. They are taking a broad security agreement and tailoring it to find ways to operate together, he added.

"Across the board, when I talk to my commanders, they tell me they are having better cooperation and developing more meaningful relationships with Iraqi commanders post-30 June," he said.

Jacoby and Iraqi ground forces commander Gen. Ali Giban sponsored a July 9 video teleconference with 500 Iraqi and U.S. commanders to discuss the agreement and the "rules of the road" governing relations between coalition and Iraqi forces. Cooperation among commanders immediately improved as a result of that, said Army Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, Multinational Force Iraq commander.

Gates said security conditions in Iraq are to the point where he may approve speeding up the withdrawal of U.S. forces. The United States has 14 brigades in Iraq today, with two scheduled to leave the country by the end of the year. If security conditions continue to improve, another brigade may leave and not be replaced before the end of the year, leaving 11 U.S. brigades in Iraq.

All this depends on continued improvement, and much can still happen in Iraq, Gates acknowledged.

Iran remains a problem inside Iraq, Jacoby said.

"Over the years, we have seen persistent Iranian influence across all domains -- political, training for insurgents, lethal aid," he said. "Iran has supported insurgent activities in Iraq, and we still see that today."

In addition, Arab-Kurd relations could be a flashpoint in northern Iraq. Jacoby said the Iraqis are going to have to solve the political differences between themselves. "From a security standpoint, I have to set the conditions so the political process can work," he said. "We do that by partnering."

He pointed to Operation Glad Tidings and Benevolence 2 in May in Diyala. This operation included Kurdish and Iraqi government security forces working together along a disputed internal boundary. Coalition forces supported the effort. "It was coordinated, it was combined and it was without incident," Jacoby said. "Coalition forces play an important, useful role in helping all sides see themselves -- not by intervening, not by interceding, but by helping each side know exactly what the intents and capabilities are and communicating back up the chains of command."

The security picture in Iraq differs depending on where you look, the general said. In Anbar province, the security environment is positive. A series of attacks took place after June 30, but well below the 12-week average and well below previous years. "We're comfortable with the security environment in Anbar, and there is a good partner relationship between the Multinational Forces West -- our Marine elements -- and Iraqi forces," Jacoby said.

In the north, security has improved in the last year, but Mosul remains a concern. Iraqi security forces have moved into the lead in the city and are doing a good job in a tough situation. "We expected continued violence. We also expected Iraqi forces to deal with the situation and lead, and that's what they're doing," the general said. "We have work to do, and there is still insurgent activities that have to be dealt with, but the Iraqis are handling it in a professional and diligent fashion."

In Baghdad, officials are satisfied with the degree of security that has held since June 30. Violent acts are well below past years, and Jacoby said a particularly good partnership exists between the Iraqi Baghdad Operation Center and Multinational Division Baghdad.

The general pointed to Iraqi security forces cooperating to protect a religious pilgrimage earlier this month, in which more than 2 million Shiia pilgrims journeyed to the Khadimiyah Shrine in Baghdad. "Iraqi forces were totally in the lead in providing security," he said. "It went off without a hitch or violence."

The successful pilgrimage demonstrated the credibility of Iraqi forces, Jacoby said. It also worked to test the new ways that coalition forces advise and enable rather than lead.

"Across the board, still have work to do, still partnered," he said. "Outside the cities, we're still engaged with our Iraqi security partners in the full spectrum of operations. In the cities, Iraqi forces are totally in the lead."

Credit belongs to American servicemembers for their flexibility and resilience, Jacoby said.

"We've asked our soldiers to adapt to a changing environment since they got here in 2003," he said. "That's the heart and soul of our formations: young leaders being able to understand the mission is different and being able to change as needed. We've asked tremendous things of our young soldiers and our young leaders, and they have stepped up every time."

Uncertainty About Military Suicides Frustrates Services

By John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service

July 30, 2009 - The most frustrating part about suicide prevention is the uncertainty about what causes troops to take their lives, top military leaders said here yesterday. This near-unanimous chorus was sounded on Capitol Hill when the second-ranking military officers of each service testified about military mental health before the House Armed Services Committee. "The most frustrating thing is trying to find a cause," said Gen. Peter W. Chiarelli, the Army's vice chief of staff.

The Army last week launched a study group comprising the military, National Institute of Mental Health, academia and other members in hopes of better understanding the underlying causes of suicide.

The largest study of behavioral health ever undertaken by the Army will examine behavioral health, psychological resilience, suicide risk, suicide-related behaviors and suicide deaths across the active and reserve components over all phases of a soldier's career, Chiarelli said.

The $50 million study will present findings quarterly, with preliminary results due in November. Chiarelli said the findings could be incorporated in real time into treatment programs. The Army had a record number of suicides in 2007 with 115, and again in 2008 with 139.

"[The study group] realizes this is not business as usual. We're not going to wait for the final results of the study," the general said, referring to the project's five-year timeline. "We feel that this could be huge -- huge for the Army, the Department of Defense and quite frankly, for America."

The general predicted that an early recommendation will be to relieve stress on the force by increasing the amount of time troops spend at home relative to the length of time deployed. Chiarelli said deployment stress has shown to manifest itself in high-risk behaviors in soldiers.

"Unfortunately, in a growing segment of the Army's population, we've seen increased stress and anxiety manifest itself through high-risk behaviors, including acts of violence, excess use of alcohol, drug abuse and reckless driving," he said.

Accordingly, the military is trying to address the broader issues underlying psychological problems that sometimes lead to suicide. "Suicide is an extreme indicator," Chiarelli said.

Navy Adm. Patrick M. Walsh, vice chief of naval operations, said the military's suicide prevention should place greater emphasis on troops after they return home from deployment.

"The reality of it is, the target for [these programs] needs to be the assimilation of those who have served back into the general population dealing with the day to day -- whether it's families, their kids, their education, their bills, and the relationship stressors associated with it," Walsh said.

"Our folks, while they're deployed, generally are OK," he said. "When they return from the cocoon of deployment, it's those first six months that are often a vulnerable time."

Echoing this finding, Gen. James F. Amos, the assistant Marine Corps commandant, said Marines generally are happy when deployed. "When they return home is when they are most at risk," he said.

In the Marine Corps, those who take their lives tend to be a certain demographic: a white male in the junior enlisted ranks, age 18 to 24, and the most common form of suicide was a fatal gunshot wound or hanging, which mirrors the civilian population.

But while most Marines who committed suicide -- 42 in 2008 -- had recently experienced a failed relationship, Amos bemoaned the lack of a more comprehensive understanding of the root causes. "We're doing abysmal," he told the legislators.

Gen. William M. Fraser III, Air Force vice chief of staff, expressed optimism that an increased number of airmen seeking assistance indicates a reduction of the stigma sometimes attached to mental health treatment. But in a quarter of the cases of Air Force suicides since 2003, that assistance was insufficient, he said.

"That's the most frustrating, is when you provide things and still it's just not enough. And you never really ever know 'What else could I have done?'" he asked ruefully. "'What else could we have done to help them to not lose hope in the face of despair and then commit that fateful act?'"

McHugh Notes Challenges at Confirmation Hearing

By Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael J. Carden
American Forces Press Service

July 30, 2009 - U.S. Rep. John McHugh's inspiration to serve as secretary of the Army lies in his desire to repay the devotion to duty exuded by today's military members despite the many challenges he'll face, the New York congressman said here today at his Senate Armed Services Committee confirmation hearing. "For all the excitement of this moment, I want to assure this committee that I appear here with few delusions as of the difficulties that lie ahead," President Barack Obama's nominee to head the Defense Department's largest organization said. "I believe I have a clear understanding of the serious and numerous challenges that face America's Army.

"They are strained by the frequency of constant deployments and stress by the pressures levied against their families," he continued. "Too often -- far too often -- they return home to only to be disappointed by a network of support systems that, despite high intentions and constant effort, continue to fall short of the level of support they so richly deserve and each and every one of us so deeply desire."

McHugh said the challenges that await him if he's confirmed have no easy answers. But providing longer "dwell time" at home stations between deployments, improving family support and services and balancing the growing needs for equipment with a decreasing budget will continue to be his focus, he said. These issues have been at the top of his priority list for some time, the former ranking member of the House Armed Services Committee noted.

"I know from personal experience the concerns and efforts each of you put forth each and every day in support of the great men and women of the military who, along with their families, sacrifice so much to protect our freedoms and our liberties wherever and whenever that challenge might arise," McHugh said. "And I have been fortunate to work in your shadow in a similar cause."

McHugh noted the difficulties that come along with balancing tough choices and decisions. He recognized that resources that may have been more abundant for the Army in the past -- such as supplemental wartime budgets in addition to the overall budget -- likely would continue to diminish.

He quoted a recent statement by Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates in which Gates said the Defense Department "cannot afford to do everything and buy everything, but, at the same time, we cannot afford defeat."

"That's a tough challenge -- tough realities. But both can be met and overcome," McHugh said. "It will take a constant formulation of new thinking and new direction."

Success also is going to require a reinvention and reinvigoration of government resources, he added. He called for the expertise of organizations such as the U.S. Agency for International Development to be used effectively to augment responsibilities and, when possible, to help to end conflicts. It should be a requirement that the Army and all the services "do their part to facilitate the effective implementation of nonkinetic tools," he said.

But in the end, he said, the military family and community and their service to the nation is the bottom line. He recalled visits to wounded warriors and to the front lines in Iraq and Afghanistan. Despite dealing with life-changing disabilities and separation from their families, he said, the devotion of military members to serve continues to grow and encourage others.

"I've visited our wounded warriors at home and abroad," he said, "and in each visit, I have been struck how these heroes, facing pain and loss and uncertainty, ask only one question: What else can I do to serve?

"We can ask no less of ourselves," he added. "How can we succeed in repaying even a partial measure of the devotion they render to all of us each and every day?"

McHugh was nominated June 2 to replace Pete Geren as Army secretary. He is a 16-year member of Congress and serves New York's 23rd Congressional District, which encompasses Fort Drum and some of the Army's most frequently deployed soldiers.

The confirmation hearing also included Joseph W. Westphal, nominated for the Army's second-ranking civilian position as undersecretary. Westphal was confirmed by the Senate as assistant secretary of the Army for civil works in 1998, and in 2001, he served briefly as the acting secretary of the Army. He's now a university system professor of political science at the University of Maine.

Juan Garcia III also provided testimony for his nomination to be the Navy's undersecretary for manpower and reserve affairs. Garcia, a lawyer in Corpus Christi, Texas, served 13 years of active duty as a Navy aviator.

Leadership Author to Speak at Professional Mojo Workshop Lineup

Editor's Note: The author is a former servicemember.

Professional Mojo, a national service provider of online workshop content for small businesses, nonprofit organizations and entrepreneurs, today announced the addition of Lt. Raymond Foster, best-selling author, and trainer, to their online workshop schedule in August for
Leadership: Texas Hold ‘em Style.

Using poker as analogy for
leadership, Captain Andrew Harvey, CPD (ret.), Ed.D. and Lieutenant Raymond Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA, found the right mix of practical experience and academic credentials to write a definitive book for leaders. Working together, Harvey and Foster have written Leadership: Texas Hold em Style. Most often leaders find they are given a set of resources people, equipment, funds, experience and a mission. As Foster noted, "You're dealt a certain hand. How you play that hand as a leader determines your success." They are now bringing this learning to the Professional Mojo community.

“We are thrilled to have Lt. Foster with us. He offers practical, easy to follow steps that leaders in all businesses can instantly identify with and incorporate into their organization. I know it will be a content-rich presentation,” commented Lee Brogden-Culberson, Chief Mojo Officer with Professional Mojo.

A graduate of the West Point
Leadership program, Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton.

Foster is a noted author who has published numerous articles in magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and on radio programs in the United States and Europe as a subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

His first book, Police Technology, is used in over 100 colleges and universities nationwide. He latest book,
Leadership: Texas Hold ‘em Style, has been adopted by several universities for course work in leadership, by several civil service organizations and has been well received in the wider market.

Professional Mojo is a boutique company that specializes in helping new, early stage and small business owners leverage social media and organic lead generation to reach customers and prospects directly. Website design services are available to those wishing to expand on what they learn in the workshop. The Mojo Mavens also have a particular soft spot for nonprofit and faith-based organizations, and facilitate online workshops, keynote talks and in-person training just for them via Outreach Mojo.

For additional information on this release, please contact:
Rachael Gatzman
Phone: (866) 2611-2715
Email: rgatzman@professionalmojo.com
Website:
www.professionalmojo.com

Summary
Professional Mojo welcomes Lt. Raymond E. Foster, best-selling author and trainer, to their online workshop
Leadership Texas Hold ‘em Style scheduled for Tuesday, August 25, 2009.

Joint Forces Command Interagency Experiment Prepares for Crises

By Navy Petty 2nd Class Katrina Parker
Special to American Forces Press Service

July 30, 2009 - U.S. Joint Forces Command and its partners, including the Department of Homeland Security, have completed an experiment designed to enhance national security by providing joint force commanders with a better capability to share information with interagency, multinational and nongovernment agencies during crisis operations. During the Interagency Shared Situational Awareness (Limited Objective Experiment, Joint Forces Command's joint concept development and experimentation directorate conducted a series of experiments last week to address standards, policies and procedures involving sharing of information over a wide area.

"What we are trying to do here is create an environment and come up with a concept of operations that will enable seamless information sharing between [the Defense Department and] interagency and multinational partners," said Navy Cmdr. Chad Hixson, the project lead. "Often times, there are policies and procedures that stand in the way of doing that."

Hixson said that even when leadership is willing to share information with agencies, the people who actually are sitting at the desk might misunderstand existing policies or be impeded by barriers limiting trust between the organizations, thus interfering with information sharing. The experiment identified policies, procedures, cultural and trust issues that can block information sharing, Hixson said.

Participants included the Joint Staff, National Guard Bureau, U.S. Northern Command, U.S. Southern Command, U.S. Pacific Command, U.S. European Command, U.S. Africa Command, U.S. Special Operations Command, the State Department, the Virginia Emergency Operations Center and the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman.

"All the key players in national security are represented," said Navy Capt. Timothy Spratto, the experimentation directorate's capabilities solutions group lead. "There is a large coalition of the willing coalescing around this experiment to explore their information-sharing techniques."

Spratto said such operations and experiments build trust among participants by providing first-hand experience in the value of sharing information with partners while achieving their own objectives.

"This experiment is a great opportunity for those organizations to get together and look at the policies and procedures that impede information sharing," said Navy Cmdr. Gregory Sleppy, Joint Staff action officer and observer. "Each organization and department has their own rules on how they share things, and those rules are not always the same. We are trying to figure out what those things are that impede the progress and flow of information."

Sleppy cited problems in 2005's Hurricane Katrina response as an example of the need to share information between agencies and government to support the people involved with the disaster relief effort.

"People may not realize that right now those organizations do not operate on the same network and cannot share information effectively," Sleppy said. "There is no common depository or situational awareness between those organizations. As a decision maker, it is difficult to make good decisions without all the information. This experiment pulls all those organizations together down to the tactical level to see how we might come up with solutions for the future."

The interagency shared situational awareness experiment focused on three areas of information sharing: geospatial, file sharing and text chat. It used computer models and long-distance virtual connections that provided participants with a continuously evolving environment to simulate a crisis.

"All the agencies who participated saw an immediate improvement in their ability to share and receive information and build better situational awareness," Spratto said.

An analysis of the information gathered will determine the value of taking this new approach of information sharing into the field, he added. "We will determine if what we have accomplished is an improvement on existing information sharing architectures, methodologies, policies and processes," Spratto said. "If there is something we can deliver directly to present operators now to put into use immediately, we will look to move that into theater."

(Navy Petty 2nd Class Katrina Parker serves in the U.S. Joint Forces Command public affairs office.)

Colonel Discusses Multinational Airlift Operations from Hungary

By Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class William Selby
Special to American Forces Press Service

July 30, 2009 - For the first time, 12 nations have come together, independently of NATO, to fly in support of their national requirements under the provisions of the Strategic Airlift Capability program, a U.S. military officer in Papa, Hungary, said yesterday. "While we don't take operational directions from [NATO], our nations are free to use their flying hours to support NATO missions," Air Force Col. John D. Zazworsky Jr., commander of the Heavy Airlift Wing at Papa Air Base, Hungary, said during a "DoDLive" bloggers roundtable. The Heavy Airlift Wing is the multinational, operational-level unit of the SAC program.

The wing's upcoming airlift operations will provide the countries involved with the ability to support humanitarian missions and combat operations, Zazworsky said. Ten of the nations involved NATO members, and two are part of the Partnership for Peace program, a stepping-stone toward NATO membership, he added.

"Due to the combination of countries," he explained, "we are not directly aligned under NATO."

While the United States contributed the wing's first three C-17 Globemaster III transport jets as part of its investment in the program, the countries involved will acquire the others jointly this fall, the colonel said.

"Each nation gives and contributes in proportion to its share of flying hours," he explained. "The money accumulated from the countries participating has produced these aircraft and the support that goes with them."

The United States has the largest share of hours and the largest share of people. "Most leadership roles are shared by the four largest countries here: the U.S., Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands," Zazworsky said.

At the request of the other nations, several U.S. members, including flight instructors and loadmasters, play key roles, he added.

"Since we already have experienced C-17 crew members, it was the quickest way to get experienced, battle-tested crews together and quickly bring in the non-C-17 nations and get their new crew members up to speed," he said.

So far, Zazworsky said, the wing has flown two missions to the United States to acquire specialized heavy equipment and vehicles required for the missions ahead.

One of the primary requirements for participating nations is to support the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan. "The large majority of our missions will be in support of troop and equipment rotation and resupply for ISAF in Afghanistan," Zazworsky said.

Because of the significance of future missions, the colonel emphasized three priorities within the wing: team, mission and future.

"We worked real hard to knit the members together -- and their families -- to get a strong team," he said. "Then, as we start to shift more and more to the mission piece, we'd have this foundation to stand on.

"I've got a very small wing on paper, but very big in impact I hope in the future," he added.

(Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class William Selby serves in the Defense Media Activity's emerging media directorate.)

Wednesday, July 29, 2009

MILITARY CONTRACTS July 29, 2009

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY
AAR Mobility Systems, Cadillac, Mich., is being awarded a maximum $94,000,000 fixed price with economic price adjustment contract for procurement of specialized shipping and storage containers, shelters and accessories. Other locations of performance are in North Carolina and California. Using services are Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Federal Civilian Agencies. There was originally one proposal solicited with one response. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is August 30, 2010. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM8ED-07-D-0003).

Freightliner of Savannah, Inc., Savannah, Ga.*, is being awarded a maximum $8,491,350 firm fixed price contract for cylinder assembly. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Army. There were originally three proposals solicited with six responses. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is July 27, 2014. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency, Warren, Warren, Mich., (SPRDL1-09-D-0033).

NAVY
AMEC Earth & Environmental, Inc., Plymouth Meeting, Pa., (N33191-09-D-0118); American International Contractors, Inc., Arlington, Va., (N33191-09-D-0119); United Infrastructure Projects , Dubai, UAE (N33191-09-D-0120); Kooheji Contractors W.L.L. Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain (N33191-09-D-0121), are each being awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple award construction contract for design and construction, renovation or repair of facilities, waterfront or airfields throughout Southwest Asia and Africa. The maximum dollar value, including the base period and four option years, for all four contracts combined is $75,000,000. Work will be performed in Bahrain (50 percent), Djibouti (40 percent), and United Arab Emirates, (10 percent), and work is expected to be completed July 2014. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the European Navy Electronic Commerce Online website, with eight proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Europe and Southwest Asia, Naples, Italy, is the contracting activity.

SRS, Inc.*, Gallatin, Tenn., (N40083-09-D-5014); Precise Concrete *, Memphis, Tenn., (N40083-09-D-5015); Chief Electric*, Memphis, Tenn., (N40083-09-D-5016); A&H Contractors *, Memphis, Tenn., (N40083-09-D-5017); G&M Associates*, Cookeville, Tenn., (N40083-09-D-5018); are each being awarded a guaranteed minimum of $25,000 (base period), design-build multiple award construction contract for design, construction, and renovation of government facilities in Millington, Tenn. The total amount for all contracts combined is not to exceed $10,000,000 (base period and four option years). SRS Inc. is being awarded the initial task order in the amount of $1,901,908 (including the minimum guarantee) for design and renovation of Bldg-452 at Naval Support Activity MidSouth, Millington, Tenn. Work for this task order is expected to be completed by April 2010. The term of the contract is not to exceed 60 months, with an expected completion date of August 2014 (August 2010 for the base period). Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The basic contract was competitively procured via the NAVFAC e-solicitation website with five proposals received. These five contractors may compete for task orders under the terms and conditions of the awarded contract. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Midwest/PWD MidSouth, Millington, Tenn., 38054, is the contracting activity.

Raytheon Co., El Segundo, Calif., is being awarded a $9,950,543 delivery order against a previously issued basic order agreement (N00019-05-G-0008) for incorporation of Engineering Change Proposal (ECP) 0035, entitled Electro Optical (EO) Daylight Operations Improvements Step 2. ECP 0035 will bring EO sensor performance within specification compliance for laser designation accuracy, geo-point targeting, tracker performance, and weapons delivery through hardware and software retrofits. Work will be performed in McKinney, Texas, (60 percent); and El Segundo, Calif., (40 percent); and is expected to be completed in April 2011. Contract funds in the amount of $9,950,543 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

AIR FORCE
International Business Machines Corporations, Yorktown Heights, N.Y., was awarded a $23,693,109 cost-share contract to develop a prototype machine reading system, reader and context reasoner, that builds domain knowledge automatically from input test allowing the creation of DoD applications with limited cost. At this time, $2,308,559 has been obligated. Air Force Research Laboratory, Rome, N.Y., is the contracting activity (FA8750-09-C-0172).

Online Education Resource Publishes Total Military Education Benefit Guide.

You’ve defended your country.... Now its time to defend your career goals. And that means earning a college degree. Civilian employment is very difficult to secure without a college degree. Like basic training, college course work builds the mental muscle you need for professional employment in business, criminal justice, education, nursing, and beyond.

Read On

Air Guard Needs Newer Aircraft, Director Says

By Army Sgt. 1st Class Jon Soucy
Special to American Forces Press Service

July 29, 2009 - One of the biggest challenges facing the Air National Guard today is replacing its fleet of aircraft that are approaching the end of their service lives, the Air Guard's director said here today. "A big problem we have in the Air National Guard is figuring out how to recapitalize our aging fleet," Air Force Lt. Gen. Harry M. Wyatt III said at a Defense Writers Group breakfast. The problem extends to fighters, tankers, airlifters, airborne warning and control systems and early warning radars. "It's the whole system that is old and needs to be recapitalized," the general said.

It's an issue facing not only the Air Guard, but the Air Force as a whole.

"To be quite honest with you, the Air Force has the same recapitalization problem as the Air National Guard," Wyatt said. "Ours is a little bit more acute and a little more immediate, because our airplanes are a little bit older." And that immediacy, he added, affects the readiness status of Air Guard units.

"If you take a look at our F-16s that do the air sovereignty alert mission, 80 percent of those will be aging out within the next eight years," he explained. "Right now, the recapitalization plan for those units doesn't have [replacements] going to those units until the mid-2020s, and that is several years too late."

Discussions are under way about how to retool the Air Guard fleet. "We're working with the Air Force to address that problem, and we're making some progress, but to date there is no plan that addresses Air National Guard issues," Wyatt said.

One of the issues taking shape within those discussions is rebalancing the force structure of the Air Force as a whole. Wyatt said that rebalancing should come at the same rate across all components of the Air Force.

"In my opinion, since the Air National Guard provides 34 percent of the capabilities of the United States Air Force -- at 7 percent of the budget, I might add -- the smart thing to do would be to take a look at bedding down whatever capability the Air Force requires concurrently and proportionally in the Guard."

Wyatt said he is afraid to see a return to the days of the Air Guard flying castoffs from the active duty force, citing his experience with the results of that formula. He flew the A-7 Corsair II for the Oklahoma Air National Guard in the early 1990s.

"When Desert Storm kicked off, we had some great capability within the Air National Guard and the A-7 platform," Wyatt said. "But the active duty [Air Force] was not flying the A-7, and they were concerned with getting the top-of-the-line weapons in the fight, and we were not asked to participate.

"That seems to me to be a great waste of money," he continued. "It makes no sense to have a platform that you're not going to use in war."

Another waste is not capitalizing on the years of experience that Air Guard members bring with them, the general said. "We have the most experienced pilots, the most experienced maintenance crews," he told the group. "We are an older force, a more mature force, and if you don't provide a platform or the capability within the Air National Guard, then that great experience withers and it dies.

"It will take you generations to regenerate that," he said. "What the Air Guard offers is the capacity on top of what the Air Force offers."

On the recent debate on the future funding of the F-22 Raptor versus the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, Wyatt -- who describes himself as a "platform agnostic" -- said capability is more important than the platform.

"I think we need to be in the same platform as the Air Force," he said. "If the decision is made in the future to acquire fourth-generation airplanes, similar to what the Navy is doing with the F/A-18 purchases, then I would advocate for the Air Guard to be in those same platforms, provided it's fielded concurrently and proportionally to the Air Guard."

And that makes fiscal sense, said Wyatt, who added that the planes and crews often pull double duty with regard to mission sets, since many Air Guard aircraft are flown as part of the air sovereignty alert mission, but can be deployed overseas as well.

"Those same airplanes that fly air sovereignty alert, they don't just do air sovereignty alert," Wyatt said. "They're written into the war plans. They do [air expeditionary force] rotations, and we participate the same as the Air Force does, so we should have the same equipment."

Wyatt said the biggest need is maintaining the Air Guard's capability to stay current in the roles it fills.

"What airplane we put it on, or how it's acquired, that's basically a decision for Congress to make," he said. "It doesn't make any difference to me. We just want the capability, and we need it before we lose the capability we currently have."

(Army Sgt. 1st Class Jon Soucy serves with the National Guard Bureau.)

Moscow Summit Produces Successes, 'To-Do' List

By Samantha L. Quigley
American Forces Press Service

July 29, 2009 - The United States had high goals for the recent Moscow Summit, and while significant progress was made, distinct challenges were identified as well, the deputy assistant secretary of defense for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasian policy told a congressional panel yesterday. "It was a test of whether the U.S. and Russia can work together to address core defense and security challenges, including strategic arms reductions, Afghanistan, proliferation of dangerous technologies, military relations and missile defense. The results were strikingly positive," Celeste A. Wallander told members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

"While we did not achieve everything on the list with this first step," Wallander said, "we made significant progress on a number of very important issues and achieved very real agreements in the defense and military spheres."

Of the eight agreements and statements signed at the three-day summit that began July 6, seven addressed defense and security challenges, she said.

Earlier this year the United States began transporting nonmilitary goods through Russia under a NATO-Russia arrangement. On or about Sept. 6, a new agreement between the United States and Russia will take effect, allowing transit of lethal materiel and personnel through Russian airspace.

Providing for up to 4,500 military flights and unlimited commercial flights, the agreement will save the United States as much as $133 million over the use of other routes. It also allows for diversification of supply lines, and reduces transit times and fuel usage, Wallander said.

"The lethal-transit agreement is part of a broader improvement in U.S.-Russian cooperation on Afghanistan," she said, adding that Russian President Dmitri Medvedev has acknowledged that Afghanistan is a common problem for his country and the United States.

Another high-priority issue for President Barack Obama at the summit was ensuring the security of nuclear materials and facilities, and strengthening U.S. cooperation with the Russians to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons, Wallander said.

"President Obama and President Medvedev agreed to broaden cooperation to increase the level of security of nuclear facilities worldwide," she said. "We also remain committed to implementing the disposition agreement, through which we will dispose of 34 metric tons each of weapons-grade plutonium."

Russia may be open to more significant cooperation in this area as the country shares the U.S. goal of ensuring additional countries in the Middle East and Asia don't seek nuclear weapons, she added.

The summit also resulted in a joint understanding on the basic framework for the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, or START, follow-on treaty, which Wallander described as a central security issue in the countries' bilateral relationship that has global implications as well.

The presidents agreed to an allowable number of strategic delivery vehicles in the range of 500 to 1,100 and 1,500 to 1,675 of their associated warheads. These numbers would have to be achieved within seven years of the treaty's entering into force, she said.

This is compared to the maximum 1,600 launch vehicles allowed by the expiring treaty, and the 2,200 warheads allowed by the Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty.

"While we made progress on START and nuclear security, missile defense remains a difficult issue," Wallander said. "Nevertheless, we were able to make some progress in laying the groundwork for cooperation in the future."

Medvedev agreed to conduct a joint ballistic missile threat assessment, which primarily would focus on Iran and North Korea, she said. "We hope that the threat assessment will offer an effective venue in which to discuss and explain our respective viewpoints," Wallander added.

The joint threat assessment's first meeting will be conducted in Moscow later this week.

The United States also pledged to renew efforts to open a joint data exchange center in Moscow. The center would allow for the sharing of missile launch data between the two countries in the effort to reduce or eliminate the chances for an inadvertent launch due to misunderstandings over a test or other benign missile launch.

"We believe that through this center we could also exchange data from third-country launches, information that would be of obvious benefit to both parties," Wallander said.

The U.S. decision on how to proceed with missile defense in Europe will be dictated by its security interests and will take into account its own security commitments to friends and allies, Wallander said. "But as we move forward," she added, "the steps initiated at the Moscow Summit will provide an excellent opportunity to engage Russia constructively on how the United States and Russia should cooperate in protecting our populations from nuclear and ballistic missile threats from Iran and elsewhere."

Russia and the United States also are working to improve military-to-military programs, with Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Russia's defense minister signing a new framework on military-to-military cooperation. The framework establishes conditions that will raise military cooperation to a new level and deepen mutual understanding between the respective armed forces.

An agreement also was made to re-engage this fall, both bilaterally and multilaterally, on discussions to re-start conventional arms control in Europe, Wallander said.

Russia renewed the work of the U.S.-Russia Joint Commission on POW/MIAs, as well. The act reaffirmed the importance of the commission as a forum through which both nations seek to determine the fates of their missing servicemen, she said.

"The summit offered an opportunity for the U.S. to clearly affirm our commitment to the security and stability of countries throughout Europe and Eurasia," she said. "President Obama affirmed our commitment to the territorial integrity and sovereignty of all countries -- naming particularly Georgia and Ukraine, and the right of all countries to choose membership in alliances, including NATO."

Obama made clear during his meetings with Medvedev and Prime Minister Vladimir Putin that U.S. support for Georgia's sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity was "steadfast and unequivocal," she added.

The Russian leaderships' views to the contrary were not surprising, but it was a measure of how much work is yet to be done and the importance of the U.S. commitment to it, Wallander said.

Another concrete result of the summit is the agreement to create the Bilateral Presidential Commission, which will provide a structure for implementing agreements reached and will monitor progress in further negotiations through six committees, she said. It also will lay the groundwork for seeking agreement and cooperation in additional areas.

While many challenges facing Russia and the United States were positively addressed during the summit, others remain on the to-do list, Wallander said.

"On the issue of sovereignty and the principles of international law that reinforce it in Europe and Eurasia, the discussions revealed that we remain far apart," she said. "[This will not] prevent us from implementing successful agreements with Russia and pursuing the very promising start established at the summit for a broader cooperative agenda.

"It is far better for our friends and partners in Europe and Eurasia if the U.S. can build on our summit success to seek progress on these tough security challenges," she added.

Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Navy Christens New Guided Missile Destroyer Jason Dunham

The Navy will christen the newest Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer, Jason Dunham, Aug. 1, 2009, during a 10 a.m. EDT ceremony at Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine.

Designated DDG 109, the new destroyer honors Cpl. Jason L. Dunham, the first Marine awarded the Medal of Honor for Operation Iraqi Freedom. Dunham was born in Scio, N.Y., Nov. 10, 1981, sharing the same birthday as the U.S. Marine Corps.
On April 14, 2004, Dunham's squad was conducting a reconnaissance mission in Karabilah, Iraq, when his battalion commander's convoy was ambushed. When Dunham's squad approached to provide fire support, an Iraqi insurgent leapt out of a vehicle and attacked Dunham. As Dunham wrestled the insurgent to the ground, he noticed that the enemy fighter had a grenade in his hand and immediately alerted his fellow Marines. When the enemy dropped the live grenade, Dunham took off his Kevlar helmet, covered the grenade, and threw himself on top to smother the blast. In an ultimate selfless act of courage, in which he was mortally wounded, he saved the lives of two fellow Marines.

Retired Gen. Michael W. Hagee, former commandant of the U. S. Marine Corps, will deliver the ceremony's principal address. Debra Dunham will serve as sponsor of the ship named for her late son. In accordance with Navy tradition, she will break a bottle of champagne across the ship's bow and christen the ship.

Jason Dunham, the 59th Arleigh Burke class destroyer, will be able to conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection. Jason Dunham will be capable of fighting air, surface and subsurface battles simultaneously and contains a myriad of offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime warfare in keeping with "A Cooperative Strategy for 21st Century Seapower," the new maritime strategy that postures the sea services to apply maritime power to protect U.S. vital interests in an increasingly interconnected and uncertain world.

Cmdr. M. Scott Sciretta, born in South Amboy, N.J., is the prospective commanding officer of the ship and will lead the crew of 276 officers and enlisted personnel. The 9,200-ton Jason Dunham is being built by Bath Iron Works, a General Dynamics company. The ship is 509 feet in length, has a waterline beam of 59 feet, and a navigational draft of 31 feet. Four gas turbine engines will power the ship to speeds in excess of 30 knots.

Additional information on Arleigh Burke class destroyers is available online at http://www.navy.mil/navydata/fact_display.asp?cid=4200&tid=900&ct=4.

MILITARY CONTRACTS July 28, 2009

NAVY
BAE Systems Land & Armaments, LP, Ground Systems Division, York, Pa., is being awarded a $52,454,810 firm-fixed-priced modification to previously awarded delivery order #0003 under contract M67854-07-D-5025 for the upgrade of 170 United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) Category I vehicles with independent suspension system kits. Work will be performed in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom areas of responsibility, and is expected to be completed by March 31, 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity.

BAE Systems Land & Armaments, LP, Ground Systems Division, York, Pa., is being awarded a $28,647,406 firm-fixed-priced modification to previously awarded delivery order #0004 under contract M67854-07-D-5025 for the upgrade of 89 United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Category I vehicles with independent suspension system kits. Work will be performed in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom areas of responsibilities and in York, Pa., and is expected to be completed by March 31, 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity.

BAE Systems Land & Armaments, LP, Ground Systems Division, York, Pa., is being awarded a $15,608,500 firm-fixed-price modification to previously awarded delivery order #0009 under contract M67854-07-D-5025 for the upgrade of 35 United States Special Operations Command Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Category I vehicles with independent suspension system kits. Work will be performed in York, Pa., and is expected to be completed by March 31, 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity.

ERS JV*, Sacramento, Calif., is being awarded $6,802,665 for firm-fixed price task order #0004 under a previously awarded environmental multiple award contract (N62473-07-D-3219) for pier radiological surveys and pier removal at Hunters Point Shipyard. The work to be performed provides for pier and wharf deconstruction at Hunters Point Shipyard. Several of the wooden piers and wharfs are structurally unsound and represent a potential hazard to navigation in San Francisco Bay. Work will be performed in San Francisco, Calif., and is expected to be completed by February 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Two proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity.

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY
Raytheon Co., El Segundo, Calif., is being awarded a maximum $48,703,289 firm fixed price, sole source contract for spare aircraft radar systems. Other location of performance is in Massachusettes, Mississippi and Texas. Using service is Navy. There was originally one proposal solicited with one response. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is July, 2012. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Procurement Operations, Philadelphia, Pa., (N00383-07-G-700H-TBD).

Sikorsky Aircraft Corp., Stratford, Conn., is being awarded a maximum $18,450,000 firm fixed price, sole source contract for aircraft rotor blades. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Navy. There was originally one proposal solicited with one response. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is September 30, 2012. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Procurement Operations, Philadelphia, Pa., (N00383-06-G-006F-THF4).

Crown Clothing Co., Vineland, N.J.*, is being awarded a maximum $8,083,845 firm fixed price, total set-aside, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contract for men's coats. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Marine Corps. There were originally two proposals solicited with two responses. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract is exercising the first option year period. The date of performance completion is July 28, 2010. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM1C1-08-D-1104).

ARMY
FN Manufacturing, LLC, Columbia, S.C., was awarded on July 27, 2009 a $ 39,958,331 firm-fixed-price contract for the procurement of the M249 Squad Automatic Weapons. Work is to be performed in Columbia, S.C., with an estimated completion date of July 24, 2014. One bid solicited with one bid received. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Joint Munitions & Lethality Contracting Center, Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., was the contracting activity (W15QKN-09-D-0019).

Balfour Beatty Construction, LLC, Fairfax, Va., was awarded on July 27, 2009 a $ 37,564,871 firm-fixed-price contract for the design and construction of two schools in the northern training area at Fort Bragg, N.C. This includes a 550 student middle school to serve 6th through 8th grade students (approximately 99,300 Sq ft), and 714 student elementary school to serve pre-kindergarten through 5th grade students (approximately 123,616 sq ft). The project scope also includes utilities, parking, playground areas, sports facilities, fencing, and landscaping and site development. Work is to be performed in Fort Bragg, N.C., with an estimated completion date of Mar. 15, 2011. Proposals were solicited on the World Wide Web with sixteen (16) proposals received. U.S. Army Engineer District, Savannah, Ga., is the contracting activity (W912HN-09-C-0033)

Holte/Graham, J/V, Ramsey, Minn. was awarded on July 27, 2009 a $ 11,157,587 firm-fixed-price-construction contract for the construction of Phase I of a new readiness center located at the Arden Hills Army Training Site, Arden Hills, Minn. Work is to be performed in Arden Hills, Minn. with an estimated completion date of Jan. 31, 2011. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with eight bids received. National Guard Bureau, Little Falls, Minn. was the contracting activity (W912LM-09-C-0005)

Hawker Beechcraft Corporation, Wichita, Kan. was awarded on July 24, 2009 a $ 21,621,564 firm-fixed-price contract for the purchase of one beechcraft king air B350 aircraft, two beechcraft king air B350C with cargo door option in the air ambulance/medical evacuation configuration and six one-month option for storage of the aircrafts. Work is to be performed in Wichita, Kan. with an estimated completion date of Feb. 28, 2011. One bid solicited with one bid received. U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, CCAM-RD-F, Redstone Arsenal, Ala. is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-09-C-0087)

New Defense Threat Reduction Agency Director Named

Kenneth A. Myers III has been selected as the new director, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). He was sworn in July 27, 2009, at the Pentagon.

Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, Ashton B. Carter, said, "The selection of Ken Myers as the director of DTRA is another significant step in transforming how we defend against the threat of weapons of mass destruction. He has the right background with 15 years of hands-on nonproliferation, counter-proliferation and arms control experience at the national level to lead the agency in its mission to protect the United States and its allies from weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and support a safe, secure and reliable deterrent." Carter added that Myers also brings experience with the Moscow and START treaties; export controls; the U.S. - India Peaceful Atomic Energy Cooperation Act; and Cooperative Proliferation Detection, Interdiction Assistance, and Conventional Threat Reduction Act.

Myers most recently served as a senior professional staff member on the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations. In this position, he serves as the senior advisor to Sen. Richard G. Lugar, the committee's ranking member, on European, former Soviet and Central Asian Affairs, and the Caucasus. He joined the committee in 2003.

Myers earned his bachelors degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and a masters degree from the Catholic University of America.

DTRA is a Department of Defense combat support agency with an annual budget of more than $2.8 billion and a military/civilian workforce of approximately 1,900. DTRA focuses on reducing the threat of weapons of mass destruction through a combination of advanced technology programs and innovative operational methods. Several technologies developed at DTRA have made significant impact in Afghanistan and Iraq. DTRA also has an integral role in several international WMD-related treaty verification programs.

DTRA headquarters is located at Fort Belvoir, Va. The agency operates field offices in Alexandria, Va.; Albuquerque, N.M.; and San Francisco, Calif. Overseas locations include Darmstadt, Germany; London, United Kingdom; Almaty, Kazakhstan; Tashkent, Uzbekistan; Moscow and Votkinsk, Russia; Kiev, Ukraine; and Yokota, Japan.

Military Prepares for Varied Threats, Official Says

By Gerry J. Gilmore
American Forces Press Service

July 28, 2009 - The 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review now under development envisions a U.S. military with the wherewithal to confront current threats such as al-Qaida as well as having the capacity to meet future security challenges, a senior Defense Department official said here today. The future security environment "is going to be more challenging" and will "involve a mix of adversaries," David Ochmanek, deputy assistant secretary of defense for force development, told reporters attending a Defense Writers Group breakfast. Ochmanek is heavily involved in the development of the 2010 review.

The congressionally mandated Quadrennial Defense Review is conducted by the Pentagon every four years to assess the threats and challenges faced by the United States and to rebalance the Defense Department's strategies, capabilities and forces necessary to confront today's conflicts and predicted future security challenges, according to a Defense Department fact sheet.

"There is still a lot of deliberation going on," Ochmanek said, regarding the ultimate capacity of U.S. forces envisioned in the 2010 review, which is due to Congress by February.

Ochmanek said Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates has "explicitly" acknowledged throughout the process that the United States has important security interests in multiple regions of the world, and therefore needs to retain the capacity and capability to project power to defend those interests.

"So, there's very much a desire to keep something like a 'two-war' or multi-engagement capacity in the force," Ochmanek said, noting that he envisions a U.S. military with the necessary force structure to conduct possible wars simultaneously on the Korean peninsula and against Iran.

Gates also believes that the United States requires flexible forces that can engage in the full spectrum of plausible challenges offered by potential foes, Ochmanek said.

U.S. forces deployed in Afghanistan and Iraq now are battling radical extremists, Ochmanek said, while future threats could involve enemies that employ hybrid warfare -- a mix of irregular and conventional tactics and weaponry. For example, the fighting that occurred in southern Lebanon in the summer of 2006 pitted Israeli troops against Hezbollah terrorists who used improvised explosive devices as well as state-of-the art anti-tank and surface-to-air missiles.

Ochmanek also observed that the existence of North Korean and Iranian ballistic missiles and those countries' nuclear arms programs present new and different security challenges than what the United States faced during the Cold War.

However, the U.S. military will be prepared to meet those and future challenges, he said.

"We're going to field capabilities better suited to this uncomfortable, hybrid environment; we're going to have the capacity to do multiple things at once," Ochmanek said.

On Target Leadership

Editor's Note: The author is a former servicemember.

July 28, 2009 (San Dimas, CA) American Heroes Press announced that the co-author of Leadership: Texas Hold ‘em Style, Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.) will be a guest on the internet-based radio program BullsEye Leaders hosted by attorney David Porter, on September 1, 2009 at 3PM Central.

Date: September 1, 2009
Time: 3:00 PM Central Time
Listen Live:
http://www.bullseyeleaderradio.com

ABOUT THE PROGRAM
Hosted by attorney David Porter, the President/Chief Creative Officer of
BullsEye Leadership, BEL Radio delivers high energy, cutting edge content for you to experience a revolutionary transformation in your business, profession or career. BEL Radio features guests from all arenas in the world of business. Sharing the common thread of success, and nuggets of wisdom to give you a leg up in the marketplace.

ABOUT RAYMOND E. FOSTER
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton. He has completed his doctoral studies in business research. Raymond is a graduate of the West Point Leadership program and has attended law enforcement, technology and leadership programs such as the National Institute for Justice, Technology Institute, Washington, DC.

Raymond has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and is currently a faculty advisor and chair of the
Criminal Justice Program at the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

His first book,
Police Technology is used in over 100 colleges and universities nationwide. He latest book, Leadership: Texas Hold ‘em Style has been adopted by several universities for course work in leadership; by several civil service organizations and required reading for promotion; and, has been well received in the wider market.

ABOUT THE BOOK
Using poker as analogy for
leadership, Captain Andrew Harvey, CPD (ret.), Ed.D. and Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA found the right mix of practical experience and academic credentials to write a definitive book for leaders. Working together, Harvey and Foster have written Leadership: Texas Hold em Style. Most often leaders find they are given a set of resources people, equipment, funds, experience and a mission. As Foster noted, "You're dealt a certain hand. How you play that hand as a leader determines your success."

More than a book: A fun and entertaining journey through
leadership that includes an interactive website to supplement knowledge gained from the book.
Proven and Tested: Not an academic approach to
leadership, but rather a road-tested guide that has been developed through 50-years of author experience.
High Impact: Through the use of perspective, reflection, and knowledge, provides information that turns
leadership potential into leadership practice.
Ease of Application: Theory is reinforced with real-life experience, which results in accessible and practical tools leaders can put to use immediately.
High Road Approach: Personal character and ethical beliefs are woven into each leadership approach, so leaders do the right thing for the right reasons.
Uses Game of Poker: Rather than a dry approach that is all fact and no flavor, the game of poker is used as a lens through which to view
leadership concepts.

CONTACT INFORMATION
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret)
909.599.7530
raymond@hitechcj.com