Military News

Thursday, April 01, 2010

Navy SEAL

On April 15, 2010, Conversations with American Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature with Chief Michael Jaco, USN (ret.) about the Navy SEALs and his book The Intuitive Warrior.
Program Date: April 15, 2010
Program Time: 1700 hours Pacific
Topic: Navy Seal
Listen Live: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/lawenforcement/2010/04/16/navy-seal

About the Guest
Chief Michael Jaco, USN (ret.) “served as a Navy SEAL with distinction for 24 years and saw combat in Operation “Just Cause.” Over the course of his career, he earned various ribbons and medals, including three Navy Commendation Medals. Jaco was also an expert at creating training courses, developing the first combat fighting course and the first climbing course for the SEAL teams. Following his departure from the military, Jaco founded a training organization that teaches participants tactical awareness skills. He also performs contract security work, often protecting government officials overseas. Chief Michael Jaco is the author of The Intuitive Warrior.

According to the book description of The Intuitive Warrior, “From conflicts in Panama to war in Iraq, Navy SEAL Michael Jaco has employed his powers of perception and awareness to save his life and the lives of his fellow SEALs. In The Intuitive Warrior, Jaco recounts the mentally and physically demanding training required of members of one of the most elite Special Forces units, and how the intuition developed during that training can be learned and applied by anyone. Using real-life examples, Jaco explains how he tapped into his intuitive capabilities to predict attacks and protect his fellow soldiers. The Intuitive Warrior will teach you how employing the methods perfected by a genuine military hero can act as a catalyst toward developing a richer, more fulfilled life.”

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is Police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. American Heroes Radio brings you to the watering hole, where it is Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in Law Enforcement, public policy, Public Safety Technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in Law Enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/lawenforcement/2010/04/16/navy-seal

Archive Link:
http://www.americanheroesradio.com/navy_seal.html
Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Statement by Army Secretary John McHugh

April 1, 2010 - "Yesterday, in response to a series of questions from reporters regarding "Don't Ask Don't Tell", I made several statements that require further comment.

"First, while President Obama has asked Congress to repeal "Don't Ask Don't Tell", it is and remains the law of the land. As I have testified before Congress and Secretary Gates has made clear, the Department of the Defense will continue to apply the law, as we are obligated to do.

"Second, I was incorrect when I stated that Secretary Gates had placed a moratorium on discharges of homosexual service-members. There is no moratorium of the law and neither Secretary Gates nor I would support one. Further, the recent changes to implementing regulations authorized by Secretary Gates, which I support, apply the law in a fairer and more appropriate manner; they do not in any way create a moratorium of the law.

"Third, with regard to the three soldiers who shared their views and thoughts with me on "Don't Ask Don't Tell", I might better have counseled them that statements about their sexual orientation could not be treated as confidential and could result in their separation under the law. Because of the informal and random manner in which these engagements occurred, I am unable to identify these soldiers and I am not in a position to formally pursue the matter.

"Secretary Gates has committed to soliciting the views of men and women in uniform across the military, including those who are gay and lesbian, within the parameters of the review process he has established. The intra-department, intra-service working group, lead by Jeh Johnson, general counsel of the Department of Defense, and Gen. Carter Ham, commander, U.S. Army Europe, is working to determine the most effective and most comprehensive way to do this. The working group is likely to utilize a third party from outside of the department to solicit these views so soldiers can speak candidly and without fear of separation. I urge every soldier to share his or her views and suggestions on this important issue through this channel. This is the appropriate way to do so.

I strongly support the deliberative process that Secretary Gates has established to review this important issue. Until Congress repeals "Don't Ask Don't Tell", it remains the law of the land and the Department of the Army and I will fulfill our obligation to uphold it.

Department of Defense Announces Selected Acquisition Reports

April 1, 2010 - The Department of Defense (DoD) has released details on major defense acquisition program cost, schedule, and performance changes since the September 2008 reporting period. This information is based on the Selected Acquisition Reports (SARs) submitted to the Congress for the December 2009 reporting period. [Note: DoD did not submit a full complement of SARs for fiscal 2009 because the fiscal 2010 President's Budget did not include updated outyear funding information.]

SARs summarize the latest estimates of cost, schedule, and performance status. These reports are prepared annually in conjunction with submission of the President's Budget. Subsequent quarterly exception reports are required only for those programs experiencing unit cost increases of at least 15 percent or schedule delays of at least six months. Quarterly SARs are also submitted for initial reports, final reports, and for programs that are rebaselined at major milestone decisions.

The total program cost estimates provided in the SARs include research and development, procurement, military construction, and acquisition-related operation and maintenance (except for pre-Milestone B programs, which are limited to development costs pursuant to 10 USC §2432). Total program costs reflect actual costs to date as well as future anticipated costs. All estimates include anticipated inflation allowances.

The current estimate of program acquisition costs for programs covered by SARs for the prior reporting period (September 2008) was $1,648,292.3 million. After adding the cost changes for H-1 Upgrades in December 2008 and E-2D in June 2009 and subtracting the costs for four final reports for Armed Reconnaissance Helicopter (ARH), Future Combat Systems (FCS), Small Diameter Bomb I (SDB I), and Presidential Helicopter (VH-71) during fiscal 2009, the June 2009 adjusted current estimate of program acquisition costs is $1,485,068.0 million.

MILITARY CONTRACTS April 1, 2010

MISSILE DEFENSE AGENCY

Lockheed Martin Corporation of Sunnyvale, Calif. is being awarded a sole-source indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract (#HQ0147-10-D-0001) with a ceiling value of $434,738,000. Under this THAAD Field Support Contract, Lockheed Martin will provide logistics, maintenance, software, training, and engineering services to fielded THAAD fire units. The contract's period of performance extends through March 2015. Work will be carried out in Sunnyvale, California; Huntsville, Ala.; and Fort Bliss, Texas. Fiscal year (FY) 2010 Research, Development, Test and Evaluation funds will be utilized for Task Orders issued in FY 2010. The Missile Defense Agency is the contracting activity (HQ0147).

NAVY

Lockheed Martin Corporation, Marietta, Ga., is being awarded a $77,148,971 modification to a previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N00019-09-D-0015) to provide additional funding for logistics and engineering services in support of the U.S. Marine Corps KC-130J aircraft. Work will be performed in Cherry Point, N.C. (36 percent), Miramar, Calif. (36 percent), and Okinawa, Japan (28 percent), and is expected to be completed in December 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command is the contracting activity.

General Dynamics, Electric Boat Corporation, Groton, Conn., is being awarded a $36,613,301 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-09-C-4413) for the complete restoration of USS Hartford (SSN 768) through final fabrication and installation of the hull patch, bridge access trunk, port retractable bow plane and the sail. Selected required maintenance will also be performed. This modification includes options which, if exercised, will bring the total cumulative amount to $86,889,301. Work will be performed in Groton, Conn.(85 percent) and Quonset, R.I. (15 percent), and is expected to be completed by November 2010. Contract funds in the amount of $20,000,000 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington Navy Yard, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Ocean Systems Engineering Corporation, is being awarded a $13,106,278 task order #0071 under previously awarded contract (M67854-02-A-9020) to provide engineering and technical support; on-going acquisition support; financial support; logistics support; website development and management; manpower, personnel and training analysis report development and assessment; manpower, personnel and training plan, development and support; administrative support and managerial support for the Program Manager (PM) Networking and Satellite Communications (NSC) and PM NSC Systems program teams. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Communications, Intelligence and Networking Systems (CINS) Product Group's (PG12) mission is to act as the central agent for the research, development, acquisition, and life cycle management of communications, intelligence, surveillance, and networking systems throughout the Marine Corps. PG12's assigned mission includes the responsibility of CINS for the Operating Forces and the Supporting Establishment. The programs within the PG cover all phases of the DoD 5000 acquisition process. The Contractor shall be required to interface and coordinate with other contractors supporting PG12 including those in all the Commercial Enterprise Omnibus Support Service (CEOss) domains. It is the contractor's responsibility to arrange any Non-Disclosure Agreements necessary to interface with other contractors in order to accomplish the PG12 mission. Work will be performed in Quantico, Va. Work is expected to be completed in April 2011. Contract funds in the amount of $299,608 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Marine Corps System Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity.

Harris Corporation, RF Communications Division, Rochester, N.Y., is being issued $12,000,000 for firm-fixed-price GSA delivery order under previously awarded contract (M67854-10-F-7003) to purchase 20 watt to 50 watt software upgrades for the power amplifier on existing tactical hand held radio AN/VRC-110 systems. Work will be performed in Rochester, N.Y., and will be completed July 15, 2010. Contract Funds in the amount of $150,397 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This GSA delivery order was awarded on a competitive basis with one offer received. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity.

Information Network Systems, Inc., Stafford, Va., is being awarded $9,542,669 for task order #0053 under previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (M67854-02-A-9013). The Marine Corps Systems Command, Program Manager (PM) for Networks and Satellite Communications Systems (NSC), and PM for Tactical Communication Systems (TCS) mission is to act as the central agent for the research, development, acquisition, and life cycle management of communications, intelligence, surveillance, and networking systems throughout the Marine Corps. PM NSC and PM TCS's assigned mission includes the responsibility to the operating forces and the supporting establishments. The scope of this Statement of Work is represented in three areas: equipment support, inventory management, and fielding team support. Work will be performed in Marine Corps Command organizations Quantico, Va., and work is expected to be completed in April 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Marine Corps System Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity.

FMW Composite Systems Inc., Bridgeport, W.V., is being awarded $8,461,035 for firm- fixed-price delivery order #0011 under previously awarded contract (M67854-05-D-5004) for 99 small and 99 medium ground expedient refueling systems. Work will be performed in Bridgeport, WV, and work is expected to be completed by March 31, 2011. Contract funds will not expire by the end of the current fiscal year. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity.

Lockheed Martin Corp., Manassas, Va. is being awarded an $ 8,091,865 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the design, development, integration, test, certification, training, logistics, and maintenance for the Integrated Common Processor portion of the various Integrated Undersea Surveillance Systems. This contract combines purchases for the Navy (95 percent) and the government of Japan (5 percent) under the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) Program. Work will be performed in Manassas, Va.(78.9 percent); Fairfax, Va.(11.5 percent); Anaheim Hills, Calif.(7.3 percent), Portsmouth, R.I. (1.6 percent), and Cherry Hill, N.J. (0.7 percent), and is expected to be completed by December 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity (N00039-10-D-0001).

The Center for Transportation and the Environment, Inc.*, Atlanta, Ga., is being awarded a $6,092,394 costcontract for the development of a Department of Defense hydrogen fuel cell material handling equipment pilot program at the Defense Depot San Joaquin(DDJC), in Tracy, Calif. This requirement is for a hydrogen 2 (H2) pilot at DDJC utilizing twenty hydrogen powered forklifts for warehousing activities, and a hydrogen generation system using renewable energy to power an electrolysis-based Hydro2 generator. This contract is in support of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the exploration of alternative energy sources. Work will be performed in Tracy, Calif. (40 percent); Allentown, Pa. (30 percent); and Latham, N.Y (30 percent), and is expected to be completed by August 2013. Contract funds in the amount of $910,000 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Crane and Federal Business Opportunities websites, with an unspecified number of proposals solicited and 8offers received. NSWC Crane, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity (N00164-10-C-GS20).

Ocean Systems Engineering Corporation, Oceanside, Calif., is being awarded $5,557,540 for task order #0072 under previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (M67854-02-A-9020). The scope of this Statement of Work (SOW) is to provide on-going support in the areas of systems engineering, acquisition, financial, logistics, administrative management to the Product Group Director (PGD) Communications, Intelligence & Networking Systems (CINS), the CINS Milestone Assessment Team (MAT), the CINS Technical Support Team (TST), and the CINS Operations Manager. The programs within this Product Group cover all phases of the acquisition process. Due to the dynamic nature of systems acquisitions resulting from the ongoing other contingency operations, the contractor must demonstrate the ability to rapidly respond to changes associated with performance, such as those resulting from new programs or system requirements, accelerated fielding requirements, or the need to support immediate improvements to fielded equipment. The contractor shall be required to interface and coordinate with other contractors supporting PG-12 including those in all the Commercial Enterprise Omnibus Support Service domains. Work will be performed in Quantico, Va., and work is expected to be completed in April 2011. Contract funds in the amount of $979,584 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Marine Corps System Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity.

DEFENSE COMMISSARY AGENCY

Military Produce Group, LLC, Norfolk, Va., is being awarded an indefinite-delivery, requirements-type contract on April 2 to provide fresh fruits and vegetables (FF&V) for resale at 21 commissary store locations in the Defense Commissary Agency's east region, considered Area 1. The estimated award amount is $53,272,046.68. Contractor will deliver FF&V to the store locations as needed. The contract is for a two- year base period beginning May 1, 2010 through April 30, 2012. Three one-year option periods are available. If all option periods are exercised, the contract will be completed April 30, 2015. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Seventy-eight firms were solicited and six offers were received. The Defense Commissary Agency, Resale Contracting Division, Produce Support Branch, Fort Lee, Va., is the contracting activity (HDEC02-10-D-0001).

ARMY

Kiewit Building Group, Omaha, Neb., was awarded on Mar. 26, 2010 a $44,500,000 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract of for the design/ build construction contract entitled, "FY08 MCA PN50350 Barracks Complex PH 6B, Wheeler Army Airfields, Oahu, Hawaii. Work is to be performed in Oahu, Hawaii with an estimated completion date of Feb. 27, 2012. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with eight bids received. U.S Army Corps of Engineers, Honolulu District, Honolulu, Hawaii is the contracting activity (W9128A-10-C-0005).

Olin Corporation, Winchester Division, East Alton, Ill., was awarded on Mar. 29, 2010 a $43,442,000 Indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity with firm-fixed-price orders. This procurement is a sole source Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity effort for the manufacture and delivery of .50 calibre M903 Sabot light armor penetrator and M962 Sabot light armor penetrator tracer bulk and the 4:1 linked configuration of the M903/M962. Delivery Order 0001 will be issued at contract award. Work is to be performed in East Alton, Ill., (50 percent), Towanda, Pa., (26 percent), Jonesborough, Tenn., (8 percent), Independence, Mo., (6 percent), Hopkins, Minn., (4 percent), Wood Dale, Ill., (4 percent), St. Marks, Fla., (2 percent) with an estimated completion date of Jun. 30, 2016. One sole source bid was solicited with one bid received. Joint Munitions & Lethality Contracting Center, Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., is the contracting activity (W15QKN-10-D-0010).

Nordic Ammunition Company, Karlsborg, Sweden, was awarded on Mar. 26, 2010 a $24,191,317 firm-fixed-price contract. This procurement is for the manufacture and delivery of 5.56 mm M995 armor piecing cartridge and 7.62mm armor piercing cartridges. Work is to be performed in Bedford, Pa., and foreign Sweden., with an estimated completion date of Apr. 29, 2011. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Joint Munitions and Lethality Contracting Center, Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., is the contracting activity (W15QKN-06-C-0009).

ARMTEC Countermeasures Company, Coachella, Calif., was awarded on Mar. 26, 2010 a $23,425,364 firm-fixed-price contract for the exercise of Option Year 1 for W52P1J-09-C-0055 for M206, MJU-7A/B in support of the flares program. Work is to be performed in Milan, Tenn., (50 percent) and East Camden, Ark., (50 percent) with an estimated completion of Nov. 30, 2011. Bide were solicited on the World Wide Web with two bids received. Department of the Army, Rock Island Contracting Command, Rock Island, Ill., is the contracting activity (W52P1-09-C-0055).

Kilgore Flare Company, LLC., Toone, Tenn., was awarded on Mar. 26, 2010 a $20,415,451 firm-fixed-price contract for the exercise of Option Year 1 for W52P1J-09-C-0056 for M206, MJU-7A/B in support of the flares program. Work is to be performed in East Camden, Ark., (50 percent) with an estimated completion of Nov. 30, 2011. Bide were solicited on the World Wide Web with two bids received. Department of the Army, Rock Island Contracting Command, Rock Island, Ill., is the contracting activity (W52P1-09-C-0056).

L-3 Communications Combat Propulsion Systems, Muskegon, Mich., was awarded on Mar. 26, 2010 a $16,149,237 firm-price with incentive and cost-plus-fixed-fee contracts. This contract is for 221 reset Bradley transmissions, 2 control tests and incentive fee pool. Work is to be performed in Muskegon, Mich., (54 percent), and Texarkana, Texas., (46 percent) with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2013. One bid was solicited with one bid received. TACOM Contracting Center, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-09-C-0098).

J&J Contractors, Inc., Lowell, Mass., was awarded on Mar. 26, 2010 a $15,987,000 firm-fixed-price contract for the design / build of an Armed Forces Reserve Center, Rutland, Vermont. Work is performed in Rutland, Vt., with an estimated completion date of May 14, 2011. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with nine bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville District, Louisville, Ky., is the contracting activity (W912QR-10-C-0038).

Purnell Construction Co., LLC., Baton Rouge, La., was awarded on Mar. 26, 2010 a $15,810,697 firm-fixed-price contract. The work consists of construction operations for enlargement of existing levee by truck-hauling material from contractor furnished borrow pit, clearing and grubbing, installation of geotextile construction of a clay cut-off trench, maintenance of truck wash down racks, fertilizing, seeding and mulching and all operations incidental thereto. Work is to be performed at the Westwego to Harvey Canal, Hurricane & Storm Damage Risk Reduction System, V-Line Levee East of Vertex, Phase 2 First Enlargement, Jefferson Parish, La., with an estimated completion date of Apr. 27, 2011. Eleven bids were solicited with five bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans District, New Orleans, La., is the contracting activity (W912P8-09-D-0042).

Brigadler Construction Services, LLC., Cleveland, Ohio., was awarded on Mar. 26, 2010 an $11,992,700 firm-fixed-price contract. This contract is to construct a 1300 person dining facility based on standard design criteria. The project shall include design and complete construction as indicated in the request for proposal. The site design and construction outside the "5 Foot Line" be in this contract. The contract is performance based, and not definitive in type of construction or materials unless otherwise indicated. A comprehensive interior design is required with an option to provide furniture and décor items. Work is to be performed in Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., with an estimated completion date of Aug. 1, 2014. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with two bids received. U.S> Army Corps of Engineers, Norfolk District, Norfolk, Va., is the contracting activity (W91236-08-D-0057).

The Ross Group Construction Corp., Tulsa, Okla., was awarded on Mar. 26, 2010 a $11,551,000 firm-fixed-price contract to renovate B730, Fort Still Okla, Work includes evaluating existing classrooms electronically, mechanically, and in regard to connectivity; renovate classrooms in preparation for reception of future Classroom 21 package/suite; renovate hallways, staircases and display areas; renovate latrines; and achieve proper temperature regulation in the Classroom 21 computer server room. Work is to be performed in Fort Still, Okla., with an estimated completion date of Aug. 10, 2012. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with one bid received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Tulsa District, Tulsa, Okla., is the contracting activity (W9126G-06-D-0043).

AM General LLC., South Bend, Ind., was awarded on Mar. 29, 2010 an $11,100,440 firm-fixed-price contract to add 94 each of High Multi-Purpose Wheeled Vehicles to contract. Work is to be performed in Mishawaka, Ind., with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2010. One bid was solicited with one bid received. TACOM Warren, AMSTA-AQ-ATCA, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (DAAE07-01-C-S001).

Greenleaf Construction Co, Inc., Kansas City, Mo., was awarded on March 29, 2010 a $10,985,396 firm-fixed-price contract for the design/ build award for a motor transport operator/ wheeled vehicle drivers course at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Work is to be performed in Waynesville, Mo., with an estimated completion date of Sept. 26, 2011. Hub-Zone set-aside bids were solicited with three bids received. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District, Kansas City, Mo., is the contracting activity (W912DQ-10-C-4012).

Paul S. Akins Company, Inc., Statesboro, Ga., was awarded on Mar. 26, 2010 a $10,777,100 firm-fixed-price contract for the construction of an advanced skills training trainee dining facility. This includes the design build of a complete enlisted personnel dining facility, supporting site work, and demolition of existing parking lot at the building site and surrounding area at Fort Benning, Ga. Work is to be performed in Fort Benning, Ga., with an estimated completion date of Sept. 1, 2011. Three bids were solicited with three bids received. U.S. Army Engineer District, Savannah, Ga., is the contracting activity (W91236-08-D-0064).

Olin Corp., Winchester Division, East Alton, Ill., was awarded on Mar. 26, 2010 a $10,691,561 requirements contract with actual awards made via delivery order and delivery order modification contract. This award is made under the terms of the existing requirements contract for 9mm M882 ball. This ammunition is used in the M9 Beretta pistol both for training and for combat. Work is to be performed in East Alton, Ill., with an estimated completion date of Apr. 30, 2012. Bids were solicited on the World Wide Web with two bids received. Rock Island Contracting Center, Rock Island, Ill., is the contracting activity (W52P1J-06-D-0031).

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

Fraga Group USA, Greenbelt, Md.** is being awarded a maximum $20,316,180 fixed price with economic price adjustment contract for fuel. Other location of performance is Spain. Using services are Navy, Air Force and federal civilian agencies. There were originally five proposals solicited with two responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is May 30, 2013. The contracting activity is the Defense Energy Support Center (DESC), Fort Belvoir, Va. (SP0600-10-D-9405).

Breeze Eastern, Union, N.J.* is being awarded a maximum $13,042,825 firm fixed price, sole source contract for aircraft mount winch. There are no other locations of performance. Using service is Army. There were originally two proposals solicited with one response. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is March 31, 2015. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Philadelphia (DSCR-AHA), Redstone Arsenal, Ala. (SPRRA1-10-D-0036).

Honeywell International Inc., Tempe, Ariz. is being awarded a maximum $7,748,600 firm fixed price sole source contract for shaft compressors. There are no other locations of performance. Using services are Air Force and Marine Corps. There was originally one proposal solicited with one response. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is October, 2011. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Philadelphia (DSCR-ZC), Philadelphia, Pa. (SPRPA1-09-G-002X-5242).

Mercury Air Center dba Atlantic Aviation, Reno, Nev.* is being awarded a maximum $7,375,457 fixed price with economic price adjustment contract for fuel. Other location of performance is same. Using services are Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and federal civilian agencies. There were originally two proposals solicited with one response. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The date of performance completion is March 31, 2014. The contracting activity is the Defense Energy Support Center (DESC), Fort Belvoir, Va. (SP0600-10-D-0007).

VA to Intensify Gulf War Illness Outreach, Care

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

April 1, 2010 - Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki yesterday announced promising news for veterans of the Persian Gulf War experiencing the broad range of symptoms referred to as Gulf War Illnesses. Acting on recommendations from a task force he stood up to identify gaps in service, Shinseki said VA plans to reconnect with veterans who deployed during the Gulf War in 1990 and 1991 to ensure they get the best information and care possible.

As part of that outreach, VA's Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force recommended improved data-sharing with the Defense Department to notify veterans of potential exposures, monitor their long-term health and provide additional follow-up.

The task force also recommended that VA strengthen training for clinicians and claims processors so they're better postured to diagnose, treat and process disability claims related to Gulf War Illnesses, and reenergize its research and medical surveillance efforts.

The task force's report will redefine how VA addresses the concerns of veterans deployed during the Gulf War, Shinseki said. "Our mission at VA is to be advocates for veterans," he said. "This report's action plans provide a roadmap to transform the care and services we deliver to Gulf War veterans."

The new recommendations come on the tail of a VA proposal announced last month to presume nine specific infectious diseases to be service-connected for anyone who served in Southwest Asia after Aug. 2, 1990, or in Afghanistan after Sept. 18, 2001.

That ruling, once adopted, will impact veterans who deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. It will relieve those suffering from the designated diseases from the burden of proving their ailments are linked to service in the Persian Gulf or Afghanistan to receive VA health care and disability payments.

The nine diseases are: brucellosis, Campylobacter jejuni, Coxiella burnetii (Q fever), malaria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, nontyphoidal Salmonella, Shigella, visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar) and West Nile virus.

During an interview with American Forces Press Service, Shinseki called the proposed ruling a positive step in taking care of Gulf War veterans suffering numerous symptoms and diagnoses yet to be pinpointed to any specific exposure.

"We can't historically go back and decide what actually caused [Gulf War Illness]," he said. "We spent $350 million trying to find the cause, and we haven't arrived at a clear answer."

Rather than simply waiting for researchers to come up with a cause-and effect solution, Shinseki pressed VA to come up with a plan to compensate affected veterans now.

"My request was, 'Can we agree that something happened?'" he said. "We have enough evidence here, symptomatically, that something happened. It may be a combination of things. We may never be able to answer exactly what caused this.

"But we can deal with the problem,' he said. "So let's take care of people."

Shinseki took a similar approach to Agent Orange, a defoliant used during the Vietnam War that many veterans blame for causing a variety of illnesses and diseases.

VA previously presumed 12 diseases to be service-connected based on Agent Orange exposure. In October, Shinseki proposed adding three more diseases to the list: hairy-cell leukemia and other B-cell leukemias, Parkinson's disease and ischemic heart disease.

Shinseki said he based his decision on a report by the National Academy of Science's Institute of Medicine citing compelling new evidence of a connection between the three illnesses and Agent Orange exposure.

"That was not an independent decision by the VA," Shinseki emphasized. "The Institute of Medicine is designated by Congress as the impartial determiner of whether or not there is sufficient evidence to make the decision like the one I made.... And they gave me enough information for me to say, 'I can see the tie.' So the decision was made."

Shinseki, a former Army chief of staff and Vietnam veteran, had long criticized past practices that put the burden on veterans to prove that the variety of illnesses many suffered was linked to Agent Orange exposure. Too often, he said, this created an adversarial relationship between VA and veterans.

"It was important to clearly let the Vietnam veterans know that they have not been forgotten," he said. "We are dealing with our responsibilities here."

Helping Bereaved Military Children

By: Robin F. Goodman, Ph.D.; Judith A. Cohen, M.D.; and Stephen J. Cozza, M.D.

The joy of family reunion after a military deployment is often more than children or parents even hoped for. However, for some children the reunion never comes. Sadly, some children must cope with the death of a parent. There are often no words to console a child or explain what happened. But surviving family members, adults, and a caring community can help grieving military children. Below are some suggestions to help ease children’s pain and support their resilience after a death.

■Be honest and open

All children need information appropriate to their age. Use clear language that includes the term “death” rather than euphemisms (e.g. “loss”, “gone to sleep”) that may confuse children. Follow the child’s lead and need for explanations of what happened. Rather than having just one conversation, stay open to ongoing questions and discussions.

■Provide a sense of safety and security

Re-establishing routines and structure go a long way towards providing children a comforting sense of stability in the midst of changes. This can be done in the simplest of ways, for example, keeping up with ongoing after-school activities and regular bedtimes.

■Be a good detective

Pay attention to how and what your child is communicating. Children often show their feelings and thoughts by their behaviors. Take a step back, ask the right questions, listen and validate their feelings.

■Support expression of feelings

Drawing, writing, playing, or reading books about grief can help children learn about and express feelings. Let them know all feelings are acceptable, and help children find healthy ways to channel them.

■Be a good role model

Children look to caregivers for examples of how to react and cope. It’s okay for grownups to show their emotions, as long as they are not out of control or frightening to children. Adult expressions of sadness can model healthy ways of dealing with difficult feelings. For example, you can say: “I’m crying because I feel sad your dad is missing your soccer game; it’s okay for you to cry when you miss him too.”

■Help children learn about the person and stay connected

Sharing stories, photos, and memories helps keep the person alive in the child’s heart and keeps the person a part of the child’s identity. For example, you can say: “Even though dad died, we can still remember how much fun we had together on our beach vacations.”

■Keep perspective about non-grief related areas

Remember that children are still moving forward in their lives. Be aware of other developmental milestones and issues your children are facing at different ages, such as peer pressure or worry over school work, which may or may not relate to the person who died. Grief may make some of these times more difficult, for example, a teen not having his dad to teach him to drive.

■Partner with other trusted adults in your child’s world

Educate others about your child’s grief and collaborate with them to support your child. For example, give and get feedback from teachers and coaches.

■Look for peer support

Children and caregivers can benefit from being with others who “know what it’s like.” Some can benefit from groups that mix military and non-military families, others prefer military specific groups such as those found on a base or offered by Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS), which holds Survivor Seminars and Good Grief Camps regionally across the country.

■Take care of yourself

The better and stronger you are, the better caregiver you will be to your children. This includes taking care of your physical health (e.g., eating, sleeping, exercising, relaxing, etc). This can also decrease children’s worry about the people they depend on. Take care of your emotional health as well by managing stress and connecting to supportive friends and family who can help you.

■Be alert to children who may be having difficulty

Some children may have a traumatic reaction. Some signs that children need more help include their being bothered by upsetting and recurring thoughts or images of the deceased person or the death, avoidance of military related reminders or talk about the person who died, and unusual irritability or jumpiness. If you notice these behaviors in your child consider seeking professional help.

■Seek professional support

Caregivers and children may believe they should be able to handle their grief on their own or that they are weak if they need help, and neither is true.

Important communities to reach out for assistance include:

■school
■community
■medical
■mental health
■faith based resources when needed

Grief is a new experience for many people. With any new experience, you can help to learn more about it, get answers to questions, and develop strategies to help you and your child get through it.

24th MEU Hosts French Foreign Legion Aboard USS Nassau


April 1, 2010 - Soldiers from the French Foreign Legion’s 13th Demi-Brigade met with senior leadership from the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, Amphibious Squadron 8, and USS Nassau, Wednesday during a key leader engagement event focused on reinforcing ties between U.S. and French militaries.

A group of ten French soldiers were welcomed aboard by the commanding officers from both the Marine and Navy units after a short flight on an MV-22 Osprey from Camp Lemonier, a joint base in the East African country of Djibouti where the visiting French unit is currently deployed.

“Whenever we interact with foreign military it’s a significant event,” said Col. Pete Petronzio, commanding officer for 24th MEU. “We operate in a joint coalition, interagency world, and today is just another example of that.”

Marines from the 24th MEU have been conducting training exercises with the French in Djibouti throughout the month of March. The visit to USS Nassau is an effort by the Marines to educate and familiarize their French partners with the unique relationship between the Marine Corps and the Navy.

“We have a great history with the French and enjoyed hosting them here to showcase our Navy-Marine Corps team,” said Petronzio. “The MEU and PHIBRON serve as an ambassadorial delegation of the U.S. and we are proud to represent our military and country to all.”

Mullen, USO Performers Thank Troops in Kuwait

By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service

April 1, 2010 - The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff ended a trip to the U.S. Central Command region with a stop to meet logisticians here. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen also brought USO celebrities with him to remind servicemembers that the American people love them and think of them.

Mullen told servicemembers and civilians at a USO event at the airport that he appreciates their hard work, and said they are the unsung heroes of America's wars.

The men and women in Kuwait are responsible for sustaining almost 200,000 U.S. servicemembers fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq. The 3rd U.S. Army also is responsible for planning and executing the drawdown from Iraq and the surge in Afghanistan. They get equipment out of Iraq and ship it either to Afghanistan for further use by troops or to the United States, where the equipment helps to reset the military.

The chairman also met up with USO entertainers he sponsored for a trip through the region. James Gandolfini and Tony Sirico of "The Sopranos" joined with Rose McGowan of the television show "Charmed" and Brian Stinchcomb, a lineman for the Super Bowl champion New Orleans Saints, to bring a taste of home to troops overseas. The visits also give the USO personalities a look at the sacrifices servicemembers face.

The chairman tries to visit the U.S. Central Command area of operations at least once a quarter, and he brings USO entertainers and personalities with him. On this trip, the USO portion of the mission launched separately because of President Barack Obama's trip to Afghanistan. Mullen delayed his trip by a day so as not to interfere with the president's visit.

The USO performers left Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington in Maryland on a C-17 March 27. They arrived at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, the next day and immediately began meeting the troops. They choppered to Forward Operating Base Airborne and held what the USO calls "meet and greets" – they met with soldiers, shook their hands and spoke with them.

Troops saw Gandolfini and Sirico and started yelling "Fuhgeddaboutit," a signature line from "The Sopranos," to them. Stinchcomb, at 6-feet, 6 inches tall, looms over most people. He said he didn't feel too out of place among a group of soldiers, because many of them work out in their free time.

The USO contingent went back to Bagram, where they held another meet and greet at the "clamshell" amphitheater before turning in.

The group toured the Joint Operations Center on March 29 and met members of the air expeditionary wing. The celebrities also visited the hospital and the Pat Tillman USO Center before flying to the NATO base in Kandahar, where they met NATO servicemembers at the base's boardwalk and visited with American troops at other parts of the base.

On March 30, the group met members of the 19th Engineer Battalion and then flew to Kabul International Airport in the afternoon. In Kabul, they toured the new facilities at the base, met with servicemembers, Defense Department civilians and U.S. contractors.

The USO group met up with Mullen yesterday afternoon just before flying to Kuwait aboard a C-32 aircraft.

Raising Expectations in Military Medical Education

Lauren Cyran
Health.mil

March 31, 2010 - Many military medical professionals are trained in the civilian sector prior to serving, but Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) in Bethesda, Md. offers individuals, both with and without prior military service, the opportunity to study medicine. The USU provides a unique approach to medical training, allowing its students to combine their passions for serving people and their nation.

“We are developing future physician leaders who can perform in austere environments and under complex circumstances,” said retired Navy Capt. Larry W. Laughlin, M.D., Ph.D., dean of the F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine at USU. “We need to ensure that our students, when they complete their education and hit the battlefields and military treatment facilities, are prepared to lead and be mentors, both in their military roles and as physicians. They may find themselves, right off the bat, in situations where their leadership will be called upon to make critical decisions that will save lives.”

Beyond the traditionally-required elements of an accredited medical school, USU’s curriculum incorporates 500 hours of military-specific education and training that emphasizes trauma and emergency medicine, infectious disease and parasitology, preventive medicine, the humanities and behavioral sciences and the principles of leadership and teamwork. USU students also benefit from alternative opportunities, including a four-week segment with an operational military unit, where their focus is not on medicine but on learning about military operations. Such trainings are especially important for those students who enter USU as a civilian, then go on to fulfill their military commitment upon graduation.

While USU stands prepared to offer these many different approaches to medical teaching, students and instructors alike take many different career paths before walking through the USU gates.

Laughlin was nearing completion of his own medical degree at the St. Louis University School of Medicine when he was drafted in 1971. Following a residency in Internal Medicine and a fellowship in Infectious Diseases at the Harvard Medical Service, Boston City Hospital, he reported to National Naval Medical Center for active duty as a Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy.

Throughout the next 13 years, Laughlin’s Navy medical career afforded him the opportunity to study and practice medicine throughout the world before returning to the U.S. as USU’s director, Division of Tropical Public Health, Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics.

Later, he took over as chair of the entire department. Laughlin has served as the dean of USU’s Medical School since 2002.

USU graduates are considered the preferred health care providers for troops since they are exposed to, and have familiarity with, military settings and protocols.

“These practitioners already bought into military medicine as a concept so they know protocols, behaviors, strengths and weaknesses,” said Laughlin. Graduates also have greater opportunities to live overseas and practice medicine in developing countries with access to DoD and State Department resources and laboratories.

Understanding the intricacies of military medicine, however, does not require that one enter straight into medicine, as Laughlin did. Army Lt. Col. Rebecca Yurek, a Family Nurse Practitioner student in USU’s Graduate School of Nursing, started her military career in law enforcement before she decided to pursue medicine.

Throughout her education at a civilian nursing school, Yurek served as a combat medic in the Reserves before joining the Nurse Corps upon graduation. As a combat medic, she was exposed to military medicine before coming to USU, while still working and studying in the civilian sector.

She has thoroughly enjoyed the ability to serve in a variety of roles spanning the world since that time, from being a critical care nurse at Fort Lewis, Wash., to an ICU nurse and commander for a company of 400 nurses, doctors and technicians at Fort Bliss, Texas, to the head nurse of cardiology in Germany, to New York City where she recruited medical students to USU.

“My biggest exposure to other [medical] schools was in recruiting. The best thing about USU is the [student-to-student and student-to-faculty] camaraderie, because at a lot of other schools, you are a number or just a face, especially in the big schools,” she said. “[At USU] everyone serves the same common purpose, it’s more than just caring for those in harm’s way, it’s the ability to serve service members, veterans, families, retirees and to respond to disasters. I think it’s that link to the flag and to Uncle Sam, responding around the world and knowing you make a difference. You feel it in your heart and soul.”

Yurek completed a six-month tour in Iraq as an ICU nurse before she applied to USU’s two-year family nurse practitioner program, which she expects to graduate from next year. She looks forward to interacting with her patients and teaching them prevention and health promotion in addition to the opportunity to train and develop younger nurses and staff. It is clear that among USU’s greatest strength is its ability to blend medical procedure and military need. As it develops military medical professionals to serve wherever the nation needs them, USU also emphasizes a research-intensive curriculum, giving students the chance to learn from dynamic leaders in their field and contribute to the advancement of medicine. “After working with wounded Soldiers and veterans, or even just those who are sick, you know what they’ve been through and that they’ve served their country, so you feel like you give more back than in civilian [medicine],” Yurek said. “Many medical advances have roots in military medicine. USU has been my best assignment yet; I’m excited to be here and to be a great nurse when I leave.”

USS Nicholas Captures Suspected Pirates

By Navy Chief Petty Officer Michael Lewis
U.S. 6th Fleet

April 1, 2010 - The crew of the USS Nicholas captured suspected pirates today after exchanging fire, sinking a skiff and confiscating a suspected mother ship.

While operating west of the Seychelles in international waters, the Nicholas crew reported taking fire at 12:27 a.m. local time from a suspected pirate skiff and returned fire, pursuing the vessel until the disabled skiff stopped.

At about 2 a.m., personnel from Nicholas boarded the disabled skiff and detained three people. The boarding team found ammunition and multiple cans of fuel on board.

After taking the suspected pirates on board, the Nicholas crew sank the disabled skiff at about 3 a.m.

Two more suspected pirates were captured on the confiscated mother ship.

The suspects will remain in U.S. custody on board Nicholas until a determination is made regarding their disposition, officials said.

The USS Nicholas, an Oliver Hazard Perry class frigate home-ported in Norfolk, Va., is supporting U.S. Naval Forces Africa, the naval component of U.S. Africa Command.

Trainer Becomes Trainee, Commander


By Army Capt. Marvin J. Baker
120th Infantry Brigade

April 1, 2010 - After four years of preparing thousands of Army National Guard and Army Reserve soldiers for deployment at the Division West mobilization training center here, Army Capt. Brent Middleton soon will be preparing for his own deployment at the Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., center. Middleton, a member of the Texas National Guard's 36th Infantry Division who joined the 120th Infantry Brigade though the 1st Army Operation Warrior Trainer program, accepted command of the headquarters company of the division's special troops battalion in a March 20 ceremony at Camp Mabry.

"This will be my second deployment to Iraq in five years," Middleton said. "I've worked to coordinate the training and resources for soldiers training under the 120th Infantry Brigade for the past two years. Now, in my new job after deployment, I will be responsible for the Joint Visitors Bureau, the battalion staff and the base defense operations center."

Middleton's experiences as the battle captain for the 120th Infantry Brigade's mobilization operations center here will make his post-mobilization training at Joint Base Lewis-McChord successful, he said.

"I will be able to better prepare my unit during the pre-mobilization [training] at home station so that we are ready for the rigors of post-mobilization training," he said.

Distribution Center Meets Warfighters' Needs


By Christen N. McCluney
Emerging Media, Defense Media Activity

April 1, 2010 - Troops in Afghanistan and Iraq are getting their work done more quickly and efficiently, thanks to the U.S. Central Command Deployment and Distribution Operations Center.

"Our goal very simply is to ensure that we are as effective as possible in supporting warfighter requirements while being as efficient as possible from the taxpayer's perspective," Air Force Maj. Gen. Robert H. McMahon, the center's director, said during a "DoD Live" bloggers roundtable yesterday.

The center, known as the CDDOC, monitors all supply routes into Afghanistan and Iraq by air, land and sea, working closely with U.S. Transportation Command and its components to ensure both people and equipment are moved in a timely manner, McMahon said. An intratheater logistics program known as the I-channel provides, in effect, a scheduled busline in the air, the general said.

"The frequency of flights is based upon the warfighter's needs," he explained. The I-channel system, which transports both cargo and passengers, serves as the main transportation mode for passengers traveling to and from Kuwait as part of their travel for rest and recuperation leave. When the I-channel is not available, CDDOC uses an intratheater airlift request system called ITARS.

"In a perfect world, all intratheater airlift moves could be accomplished utilizing our I-channel system," McMahon said. "The reality is that every day there's a myriad of requirements that bubble up that necessitate a unique [intratheater] airlift request be generated."

ITARS is used when a high-priority movement can't wait for a scheduled flight, the general said. In any given month, about 75 percent of intratheater airlift movements are accomplished through that system.

The center's theater express program gives commercial carriers an opportunity to use excess capacity to carry cargo within the theater.

One of his biggest concerns, McMahon said, is ensuring that his team properly and effectively deploys conventional and all-terrain mine-resistant, ambush protected vehicles. If that takes more capability than C-17 Globemaster III and C-5 Galaxy transport jets can provide, he said, he looks for other means to get the life-saving vehicles to the warfighters.

"My job is to ensure that I've leveraged everything that's available, just not those C-17s or C-5s, to be able to get what we need in place on time," he said.

Another big challenge, the general said, is the drawdown in Iraq. "We have to leverage all of the available tools and capacity that we have, both on the ground and in the air," he said. "I have to help facilitate success."

In Afghanistan, McMahon said, improving infrastructure such as airports, roads and rail lines is a high priority. "This not only benefits our force flow and sustainment requirements," he explained, "but more importantly to me, it contributes to Afghanistan's future."

McMahon also credited Centcom and Transcom logisticians and teamwork in general with allowing the CDDOC to be effective.

"We could not accomplish what we do today without the teaming between the commercial sector and the military sector, not only to prepare the equipment, to prepare the sustainment, but also to move that forward," he said.

"All of this takes place because of the teamwork between military and industry, between private- and public-sector movement teams, and because everyone is single-focused to ensure that the warfighter has what they need when they need it."

National Guard mom semi-finalist for Military Motherhood Award


By Carrie E. David Ford
U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command

(3/31/10) - Six hundred women, many unknowingly, competed recently for a motherhood award, and one woman at the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command shined so brightly that she was chosen as one of the 20 semi-finalists.

Sgt. Sophia I. Malone, human resource technician in G-1 (Human Resources), is the only Alabama semi-finalist in Operation Homefront/Lockheed Martin's 2010 Military Motherhood Award.

"I am a Soldier, a daughter, a sister, a friend... but most of all, I am a mom," said Malone, who has three children: twins, Lacy and Lexy, 15, and Edwin "EZ" Zane, 11. "So this has to be the most amazing honor I could possibly receive."

Malone, 39, was nominated for the award by Kari Hawkins, Redstone Rocket reporter at Redstone Arsenal, Ala. Hawkins interviewed and wrote a feature about Malone in January.

"Sgt. Malone's story is so compelling," Hawkins said. "As a mom, she has made so many sacrifices to serve her country. Being a mom in uniform requires strength of character and a high level of conviction that is very unique to female Soldiers."

Malone joined the Army in 1990 and served a tour of duty during the Persian Gulf War. She left active duty after four years to get married and raise a family, but began considering serving again after the attacks of Sept. 11.

"I debated for a year about rejoining the military," Malone said. "But I was a mom, which was my first priority. What could I do?"

Rejoin, of course. Only this time, Malone chose the National Guard expecting a part-time experience. She has been on active duty since 2005, sustaining injuries in two different incidents from improvised explosive devices - in November 2006 and August 2007. After her injuries, she returned stateside and worked as an instructor.

"I don't regret any minute," Malone said. "As an instructor, it really hit me - I helped prepare young Soldiers to perform the very missions I performed in theater."

As for her children, Malone said she uses her growing up experiences and the strength of the women from her youth as tools to help her in raising them. She also relies on her children's father.

"The kids' father is outstanding; I could not do this without him," Malone said.

This loving mother raves about her kids to anyone who will listen, including a captive audience. On her Facebook page in February she wrote, "Loving children is the only love that can make you cry with pride, cry with pain, cry when they cry, and cry just looking at them - realizing how much you love them... Thankful for my three beautiful children.

"I tell my kids to always do their best no matter what, and to treat everyone as you would want to be treated," Malone said. "I tell them every day that I love them and how important they are to me."

Hawkins said that Malone represents all mothers who work to balance a commitment to their family and a desire to serve their country.

"She is not the traditional image of the mother who is always home to care for her family daily. But she is the image of the modern-day mother who has made hard choices and faced tremendous challenges as a mom and as a Soldier," Hawkins said. "Sgt. Malone is a strong example of a mother who exemplifies leadership, dedication and service in everything she does."

And service is something Malone stresses as important.

"Doing my job as a Soldier is vitally important to me," she said. "I try to be the best I possibly can be and make my children as proud of me as I am of them. I am not ready to hang up my uniform, not yet. I still have time in me to serve my country. I am a patriot. Plain and simple - I would die for my country."

For voting instructions or information on the contest, visit http://www.operationhomefront.net/ or http://www.homefrontonline.com/ or search on Facebook for "Military Motherhood Award" to link to Malone's MMA Facebook page.

Following the voting period, which ends April 7, a panel of judges will select a winner from the top five finalists. The winner will receive $5,000 and a trip to Washington, D.C.

PA Guard adjutant general swears in son, continuing family history of Army aviation

(3/30/10) -- The adjutant general of the Pennsylvania National Guard, Army Maj. Gen. Jessica Wright, recently swore her son Mike Wright into her ranks.

Mike Wright, a Reserve Officer Training Corps cadet at King's College, was sworn into the Pennsylvania Army National Guard at a ceremony held at the Kingston Armory in Wilkes-Barre, Pa.

Wright joined the 2-104th General Support Aviation Battalion at Fort Indiantown Gap, continuing a family tradition in the field of Army Aviation.

As a member of the Pennsylvania National Guard, Maj. Gen. Wright became the first female Army National Guard aviator. She also became the Army’s first female maneuver brigade commander, while commanding the 28th Infantry Division’s Combat Aviation brigade.

Cadet Wright’s father, Chuck Wright, is a retired lieutenant colonel and a former Army aviator.