Military News

Friday, July 10, 2009

41 DoD Scientists and Engineers Win Presidential Award

The White House yesterday announced 41 researchers nominated by the Department of Defense (DoD) as winners of the 2008 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The awards are the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on faculty members who are beginning their independent research careers.

The DoD's selections for this prestigious award included submissions from the Army, Navy, and Air Force, based on the individual's innovative research at the frontiers of science, engineering and education.

"The DoD researchers who are receiving this distinguished award are exceptional technical leaders in their disciplines," said Zachary J. Lemnios, director, Defense Research and Engineering. "We are fortunate to have such a talented cadre of scientists and engineers who are interested in our national security technology challenges."

The recipient scientists and engineers will receive their awards this fall at a White House ceremony. The DoD 2008 PECASE scholars will receive grants of $200,000 a year for up to five years to conduct basic research in support of critical government missions.

MILITARY CONTRACTS July 10, 2009

AIR FORCE
Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co., Sunnyvale, Calif., was awarded a $262,500,000 contract for the long lead parts and material procurement for the 4th Space Based Infrared Systems Geosynchronous Earth Orbit Satellite and the 4th Highly Elliptical Orit Payload. At this time $137, 125,000 has been obligated. Space Based Infrared Systems Wing, Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif., is the contracting activity (FA8810-08-C-0002).

Northrop Grumman Mission Systems, Electromagnetic Systems Laboratory, San Jose, Calif., was awarded a $71,147,842 cost plus incentive fee contract to provide MQ-1 unmanned aerial system communication intelligence airborne signals intelligence payload -1 C scaled sensors for the Predator unmanned aerial system. At this time, $69,851,657 has been obligated at this time. Reconnaissance Systems Wing, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is the contracting activity (FA8620-08-C-3004).

ARMY
J. Kokolakis Contracting, Inc., Bohemia, N.Y., was awarded on July 7, 2009 a $ 103,748,350 firm-fixed-price contract for the design and construction of relocation of United States Military Preparatory School, United States Military Academy, West Point, N.Y. Work is to b performed in West Point, N.Y., with an estimated completion date of Apr. 7, 2012. Sixty bids solicited with six bids received. Corp of Engineers, CENAN-CT, New York, N.Y., is the contracting activity (W912DS-09-C-0012).

Alliant Techsystems Inc. Keyser, W.V., was awarded on July 8, 2009 a $ 5,725,179 firm-fixed-price contract for the M11155A1 Enhanced Portable Inductive Artillery Fuze Setter (EPIAFS) System. Work is to be performed in Keyser, W.V., with an estimated completion date of July 23, 2012. Three bids solicited with three bids received. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Joint Munitions & Lethality Contracting Center, CCJM-CA, Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., is the contracting activity (W15QKN-07-C-0095).

NAVY
Navistar Defense LLC, Warrenville, Ill., is being awarded $71,081,162 for firm-fixed- priced delivery order 0006 modification under previously awarded contract (M67854-07-D-5032) for the procurement of battle damage assessment and repair (BDAR) kits. This order is in support of the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle program. The BDAR Kits will sustain both the MaxxPro Base and MaxxPro Plus vehicle variants. Work will be performed at the Red River Army Depot in Texarkana, Texas, and deliveries are expected to be completed by Aug. 1, 2009. Contract funds in the amount of $71,081,162 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The base contract was competitively awarded, and the new requirements are sole source additions to the contract. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity.

General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, is being awarded a $33,066,885 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-06-C-2307) to exercise options for the accomplishment of Lead Yard Class services for the DDG 51 Class AEGIS destroyer program. This work will provide technical assistance to the Follow Yard in the interpretation and application of the detailed design developed by Bath Iron Works Corp., the Lead Yard contractor. DDG 51 Class services include: liaison for follow ship construction, general class services, class logistic services, class design agent services and class change design services for follow ships. Work will be performed in Bath, Maine and is expected to be completed by July 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

General Dynamics – Ordnance and Tactical Systems, St. Petersburg, Fla., is being awarded a $20,756,123 firm-fixed-price delivery order #0021 under previously awarded contract M67854-05-D-6014, for the procurement of 20 full rate production expeditionary fire support systems (EFSS) together with their corresponding basic issue item kits, additional authorization list hardware and mortar weapon spares. The EFSS provides all-weather, ground-based, close supporting, accurate, immediately responsive, and lethal indirect fires. The EFSS is defined as a launcher, mobility platform (prime mover), ammunition (not included in this order), ammunition supply vehicle, and technical fire direction equipment necessary for orienting the weapon on to an azimuth of fire and accurately computing firing data. Work will be performed in St. Aubin, France (29 percent); Robbins, N.C. (10 percent); and Forest, Va. (7 percent), and work is expected to be completed by Dec. 30, 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The basic contract was competitively procured. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity (M67854-05-D-6014).

The Northrop Grumman Corporation, Marine Systems, Sunnyvale, Calif., is being awarded a $14,318,064 cost-plus-fixed-fee, firm-fixed-price contract to develop and design launcher subsystem risk reduction demonstration hardware, test stand, and necessary related test equipment with the capability to conduct an underwater launch demonstration of a D5 missile in a large diameter missile tube. This contract contains an option, which is exercised will bring the contract value to $17,111,932. Work will be performed in Sunnyvale, Calif., and work is expected to be completed Mar. 31, 2010, with one option for studies with a period of performance of 12 months from the date the option is exercised (if exercised). Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The contract was not competitively procured. The Navy's Strategic Systems Programs, Arlington, Va., is the contracting activity (N00030-09-C-0015).

Raytheon Co., Tucson, Ariz., is being awarded a $12,803,117 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to provide the engineering, material and test support for the Joint Multi Effects Warhead System Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD). The JCTD will serve to integrate several warhead technologies onto the Tomahawk Block IV cruise missile, and demonstrate an expanded capability against hard and large area targets using a two-stage warhead design in a "multi-effects" system. Work will be performed in Tucson, Ariz., (90 percent) and China Lake, Calif., (10 percent), and is expected to be completed in January 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to the FAR 6.302-1. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity (N00019-09-C-0062).

General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems, Fairfax, Va., is being awarded a $10,234,993 cost-plus-incentive-fee contract for engineering services in support of the AN/BYG-1 Weapons Control System. The 117,000 engineering service hours will be used to migrate the AN/BYG-1 weapons control system from a technology insertion (TI-08) baseline to a TI-10 baseline and integrate advanced processing build (APB-09) and deliver this capability in multiple variants to multiple submarine platforms. Work will be performed in Fairfax, Va., (53.6 percent); Cape Canaveral, Fla., (17.6 percent); Roswell, Ga., (12.5 percent); Middletown, R.I., (7.7 percent); McLean, Va., (2.6 percent); Hampton, Va., (4.6 percent); Greensboro, N.C., (1.2 percent); Arlington, Va., (.05 percent); Fairfax Station, Va., (.06 percent); and Waterford, Conn., (.09 percent), and is expected to be completed by July 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via Federal Business Opportunities, with three offers received. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington Navy Yard, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00024-09-C-6246).

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY
Belleville Shoe Mfg., Co., Belleville, Ill., is being awarded a maximum $21,969,550 fixed price with economic price adjustment, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity, partial set aside contract for hot weather combat boots. Other location of performance is Arkansas. Using services are Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. The original proposal was Web solicited with nine responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract is exercising the second one-year option period. The date of performance completion is July 9, 2010. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM1C1-07-D-1518).

Altama Footwear, Atlanta, Ga., is being awarded a maximum $19,363,621 fixed price with economic price adjustment, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity, partial set aside contract hot weather combat boots. Other locations of performance are Puerto Rico and Tennessee. Using services are Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. The original proposal was Web solicited with nine responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract is exercising the second one-year option period. The date of performance completion is July 9, 2010. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM1C10-07-D-1519).

Wellco Enterprises, Inc., Waynesville, N.C., is being awarded a maximum $14,498,933 fixed price with economic price adjustment, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity, partial set aside contract for hot weather combat boots. Other locations of performance are Puerto Rico. Using services are Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. The original proposal was Web solicited with nine responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract is exercising the second one-year option period. The date of performance completion is July 9, 2010. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM1C1-07-D-1522).

Propper International, Inc., Mayaguez, Puerto Rico is being awarded a maximum $6,940,833 firm fixed price, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity, contract for utility coveralls. Other locations of performance are Puerto Rico. Using service is Navy. The original proposal was Web solicited with 13 responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract is exercising the first one-year option period. The date of performance completion is Oct. 10, 2010. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM1C1-08-D-1054).

Rocky Shoes & Boots, Inc., Nelsonville, Ohio is being awarded a maximum $6,149,352 fixed price with economic price adjustment, indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity, partial set aside contract for hot weather combat boots. Other locations of performance are Puerto Rico. Using services are Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. The original proposal was Web solicited with nine responses. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract is exercising the second one-year option period. The date of performance completion is July 9, 2010. The contracting activity is the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., (SPM1C1-07-D-1523).

War on Terrorism: Is your city prepared for a home-made nuke?

War on Terrorism: Is your city prepared for a home-made nuke?

Stavridis at Forward Edge as Military Embraces Social Media

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

July 10, 2009 - The very day he assumed his post as NATO's supreme allied commander for Europe last week, Navy Adm. James Stavridis reached out in a way none of the previous 15 NATO commanders since Army Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower had: he posted a blog. Stavridis has had a lot of firsts in his military career. He's the first sailor to hold NATO's top military post and command of U.S. European Command. But before that, he was the first geographic combatant commander, at U.S. Southern Command, to use Facebook and a personal blog to convey the importance of partnership and cooperation to confront threats facing Latin America and the Caribbean.

Now in his new post, he's wasting no time using the social media to get word out about his goals for Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe and Eucom.

Stavridis named his new blog, "From the Bridge," a reference to the two commands' focus on bridging the Atlantic to link the United States and Europe.

With headquarters in both Mons, Belgium, and Stuttgart, Germany, he acknowledged in his inaugural blog the importance of being able to communicate Eucom's and NATO's message intelligently -- and his own leadership principles effectively.

"The professional characteristics that matter to me are simple: civility, quiet confidence, creativity, teamwork and collaboration, determination, and -- above all -- honesty and integrity," he wrote. "I'll write a future post about these characteristics and why I think they are essential."

Stavridis may be among the pioneers in recognizing the importance of social media to the military, but he's far from the exception. A growing number of senior military and defense leaders are turning to blogs, Facebook pages, Twitter entries and other social networking venues to share information and seek feedback.

They're using these new tools to communicate their goals and activities, seek broader input they can apply to their decision making, and engage with groups that simply can't be reached through traditional communication channels.

The efforts run the gamut -- from Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates' Facebook page to Joint Chiefs Chairman Navy Adm. Mike Mullen's Twitter entries to blogs regularly updated by everyone from combatant commanders to troops deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan.

Social media is a new phenomenon, with the first recognizable social network site tracing its roots to just 1997. But it's taken the world by storm. By some estimates, more than 60 million people maintain a blog. Meanwhile, the MySpace and Facebook social networking sites have quickly risen to become the most-visited U.S. Web sites.

The military has taken notice.

Marine Gen. James E. Cartwright, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, was among the first military leaders to embrace social media. Before his current post, while commanding U.S. Strategic Command, he made the cutting-edge move of launching a command-and-control blog. His goal was to cut through the traditional top-down military structure and information stovepipes to improve communications.
Air Force Gen. Victor E. Renuart, commander of U.S. Northern Command and North American Aerospace Defense Command, blogs regularly on his command's Web site.

When U.S. Africa Command was standing up as the newest geographic command, Army Gen. William E. "Kip" Ward made the first entry on its online blog, "Africom Dialogue" to describe the command's goals to his own staff and the public at large. Since then, Ward and his staff regularly post updates about the command's activities in the region, providing a feedback box that invites readers to respond.

Mullen announced on a July 2 Twitter "tweet" that he'd just launched his own Facebook page. More than 3,300 of his Twitter followers get regular updates of his travels, messages and other news.

Meanwhile, the commander of U.S. Central Command, Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, has been a long-time Facebook member. More than 6,250 fans have signed up for his page, and their comments are posted unfiltered, alongside many photos.

Army Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, commander of Multinational Force Iraq, updates his Facebook page daily with photos, news and comments from his fans. The fan base grew exponentially -- to almost 3,000 members -- just two and a half weeks after the page launched in early April, after it was mentioned during a TV interview.

These and other defense leaders recognize social media forums as the information tool of choice among the "millennial generation" -- 18-to-25-year-olds, many of whom don't read newspapers, tune in to network news or visit official Web sites.

In addition, they introduce a dynamic that leaders simply can't get through traditional communication methods: unfettered two-way engagement.

For example, 19 responders to Stavridis' new blog extended nuggets that may -- or may not -- have made it to him through his handlers. Most offered congratulations and best wishes. A couple had questions or advice about addressing strategic communications within NATO. One suggested that he make a video of himself when he travels to Afghanistan to underscore why the mission there matters.

"I'd like this forum to be a place where we can share ideas and opinions," Stavridis wrote, responding to their comments. "Please feel free to share your thoughts on how we might communicate most effectively -- or on anything else, for that matter!"

Air Force Gen. Douglas Fraser, the new Southcom commander, quickly took Stavridis' lead, posting his first "In the Americas" blog July 3, a week after his change-of-command ceremony in Miami.

Fraser used his first blog message to outline his expectations of his staff and himself in engaging with the region. But he also made it clear he welcomes the open and professional exchange taking place throughout the command, the product of hard work and communication that can only be enhanced through social media tools.

"I hope we can all continue to build on this," he wrote. "I truly feel that no one of us is as strong as all of us together!"

Chairman Welcomes New National Defense University President

By Samantha L. Quigley
American Forces Press Service

July 10, 2009 - If anyone can build on the achievements of the National Defense University's outgoing president, it's her successor, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said during a change-of-command ceremony here today. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen officiated as Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Frances Wilson passed command of the institution to Navy Vice Adm. Ann E. Rondeau in a brief ceremony at Fort McNair, where the university is located.

"I've charged her to ... expand on what Fran has advanced here by inventing a new whole-of-government approach to education in the future of public service," Mullen said. "[I've asked her] to reach out deeper and farther and wider, not just to partners we have, but to those we would like to have to make this university not only about preserving our national defense, but also about pursuing our national security.

"Just a reminder Ann, you have an office call with me a week from Tuesday," he joked.

Those are tall orders considering Wilson's accomplishments. During her three-year tenure as president, she established the Institute for National Security Ethics and Leadership, the Center for Joint and Strategic Logistics Excellence and laid out the university's first formal strategic plan, among other undertakings.

Before Wilson officially handed the reins to Rondeau, Mullen thanked her for her stalwart leadership of the institution.

"I know I speak for the entire staff and faculty of [the National Defense University], as well as the military interagency and international leadership gathered here today, when I say that you will truly be missed," Mullen said. "We thank you for your commitment and your principled leadership, [and] we thank you for caring about the future of public service."

Wilson, in turn, thanked her colleagues and family before welcoming her successor.

"It has been an honor, privilege, and a pleasure to serve with each of you," she said. "Ann, you are about to assume stewardship of a tremendous institution. You will find it uniquely engaging, stimulating, challenging, and ultimately very satisfying."

After accepting the university's flag from Mullen in a symbolic transfer of authority, Rondeau expressed her gratitude for the opportunity to serve as the institution's president.

"On this day I thank you for this privilege of service, for the friends and the mentors, and for all of you who are part of this knowledgeable community," she said. "Gratitude and thank you to Lieutenant General Fran Wilson [who has] made my job that much better, because we can take it from here ... based upon the honorable and good decisions which you have made."

Rondeau last served as the deputy commander of U.S. Transportation Command. She holds a degree in history from Eisenhower College, a master's degree in comparative government from Georgetown University, and is pursuing a doctoral degree from Northern Illinois University. This is in addition to holding subspecialty qualifications in political-military affairs, operational intelligence, operations analysis, strategy and planning and military transportation.

Army Guard On Course to Reach End-strength Goal

By Army Staff Sgt. S. Patrick McCollum
Special to American Forces Press Service

July 10, 2009 - The Army National Guard is changing recruiting policies to lower its end strength by the end of the fiscal year, Guard officials said today. These changes will enable the Army Guard to decrease its end strength from 362,493 soldiers to a congressionally mandated force of 358,200 by Sept. 30.

"When you go from a growth mode to a contraction mode, it takes six to eight months to get everybody to move towards reduction," said Col. Michael Jones, commander of Army National Guard Strength Command.

The Army National Guard implemented many recruiting initiatives to grow from 330,000 in June 2005 to more than 362,000 in 2008. Increasing bonuses and the number of recruiters, and programs such as the Guard Recruiting Assistance Program, or G-RAP, which pays $1,000 to Guard members for referring someone who enlists and $1,000 when that person ships to basic training, made the difference.

The Army Guard grew by 18,800 members over two fiscal years, an unprecedented growth for any Defense Department component since the draft era, Jones said. For the first time in history, the Army Guard had achieved more total end strength than all other Defense Department components combined.

To adjust this year, the Army Guard is making changes that will affect both soldiers coming into the Guard and those transitioning out.

"We're tightening up the criteria it takes to qualify to come into the National Guard," Jones said. For those enlisting in the Army Guard, the maximum enlistment age is being lowered to 35 from 42. Medical and bad-conduct waivers will not be granted to new enlistees, and enlistment and retention bonuses will be eliminated for all soldiers currently not serving in Iraq or Afghanistan.

The Army Guard also is making it easier for soldiers to leave. "The discharge process was a little bit cumbersome and a little bit lengthy, so we've streamlined that," Jones said.

Finally, soldiers who fail to ship to basic training within 12 months will be discharged.

"We need to have [soldiers] qualified now," Jones said. "If they can't get qualified now, we need to move them out of our end strength."

Even in a scaled-back recruiting environment, however, some highly sought-after vacancies need to be filled. The Army Guard will shift its focus to officer and warrant officer recruiting and encourage current enlisted members to consider these options.

These measures have had the desired effect on end strength. For the past 12 weeks, the Army Guard's end strength has steadily declined by about 500 soldiers a week. The trend has Jones feeling optimistic about reaching the goal. "We'll get to 358,000," he said. "Not a problem."

Defense Department officials announced overall recruiting numbers for June today. The Army National Guard fell short of its mark, recruiting 84 percent of its goal to add 3,209 soldiers, while the Air National Guard had 867 accessions with a goal of 810, for 107 percent.

(Army Staff Sgt. S. Patrick McCollum serves at the National Guard Bureau.)

Def Leppard, Raven Drum Foundation Offer Free Concert Tickets

By Sharon Foster
American Forces Press Service

July 10, 2009 - To honor the military and provide a little fun and excitement over the summer months, the rock group Def Leppard and Raven Drum Foundation have started giving away 100 free concert tickets to military members and veterans with military ID for each show in the 2009 Def Leppard summer concert tour. Poison and Cheap Trick also will perform on the entire tour.

"Def Leppard's involvement came through a desire to give something back, and what better way to honor these heroes than with a night of music?" said Rick Allen, Def Leppard's drummer and Raven Drum Foundation founder. "We wanted to thank these heroes in a meaningful way for their service."

The summer tour kicked off in Camden, N.J., June 23 and is scheduled to run through Sept. 12, with concerts in Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, Illinois, Missouri, Indiana, Michigan, North Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, California, Nevada, Massachusetts and Washington.

"To date, there have been nine U.S. shows," said Jennifer Buzza, director of the Raven Drum Foundation. "Approximately 100 tickets have been given to military families and veterans for these shows. There are approximately 100 tickets for each of the remaining 33 shows. Nearly half have already been claimed."

Military personnel and veterans with a military ID are eligible to receive two tickets to one Def Leppard show. Tickets are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Register at http://ravendrumfoundation.org/news-events/free-dl-tickets-for-veterans.html to be placed on the guest list, then show military ID to a representative near the box office before the show. In addition to checking ID, the representative will ensure the person picking up the tickets is registered and on the guest list.

"We are working closely with the Wounded Warrior Project," Buzza said. "For many shows, one of their volunteers or staff people will be the representative handing out tickets." The Salute America's Heroes troop-support group also is helping with ticket distribution.

The free concert tickets are directly related to the Raven Drum Foundation's mission.

"Music is just one of the tools we use to promote healing -- to serve, educate and empower veterans and people in crisis through the power of the drum," Allen said. "It is so exciting to have my band, family and so many others contributing to this effort. I thank everyone involved, especially the veterans."

Buzza said the band and the foundation want to brighten some lives. "We wanted to offer an evening of pure entertainment, an evening free of normal troubles," she said. "This venture allows Raven Drum and Def Leppard to do just that."

Concert dates and venues are listed on the registration Web site.

Official Cites Need for Technology Acquisition Reform

By Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael J. Carden
American Forces Press Service

July 10, 2009 - The Defense Department's information technology acquisition process is too slow to be cost-effective, a senior Pentagon official told Congress yesterday, citing the need for acquisition reform within the department. "Based on my experience, the traditional [Defense Department] acquisition process is far too slow to keep pace with the extremely rapid pace of information technology change," said Tim Harp, acting deputy assistant defense secretary for command, control, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, and information technology acquisition.

Harp explained to the House Armed Services Committee's subcommittee on defense acquisition reform that the current process, which mirrors the department's weapons systems acquisition procedure, doesn't work for information technology. The various phases of weapons system acquisition are ill-suited for information technology systems, he said.

Harp described the department's acquisition process and how it contradicts President Barack Obama's desire to cut back on government spending.

The first phase in acquisition is to mature the purchased technology, he said, but information technologies in the commercial sector already are largely established. The next phase is intended to prepare a program for production, though information technology isn't produced in quantities. The final phase of production is irrelevant, he said, again because information technology isn't produced by numbers, he said.

The thought of information technology in terms of life-cycles has become ambiguous, Harp told the House panel. Rather than completely rebuild or reproduce new technology after a certain amount of time, as is the case with weapons system life-cycles, information technology can be updated and adjusted periodically to keep pace with the commercial sector, he said.

"The pace of commercial information technology development allows us to build or adopt information technology and continue to modify it indefinitely," he explained, "rather than replace an entire system in a pre-determined period of time."

That the powers of information technology will double every 18 months is a compelling idea that's been proven valid among the systems acquired by the Defense Department, he said. That reality places high demands on defense officials to change system requirements much sooner than they may originally have anticipated to enable relevant technology fielding on the battlefield or home station, he added.

"Combat operations are being conducted in rapidly changing circumstances, placing pressure to change requirements ... to respond to adversary tactics," he said. "Also, the warfighters of today are information-technology savvy, with expectations to leverage the unprecedented innovation in the commercial market to enhance [the Defense Department's] information systems and capability.

"The combination of these very real forces lead to significant requirements-change pressure on our information technology process," he continued. "We should begin to embrace the concept that changing requirements might actually be desirable for information technology acquisitions, rather than follow the inherent weapons-system acquisition process assumption of stable requirements over time."

An information technology acquisition model recently proposed by the Defense Science Board recognizes the distinctive facets of information technology and addresses the funding and process challenges, he said. The proposal suggests a more agile process and exploitation of the inherent module and nature of the information technology that builds smaller capability releases, rather than large programs.

In fiscal 2010, the Defense Department will establish 10 pilot programs to acquire information technology under a new process, Harp told the subcommittee, adding that he expects the programs rapidly will improve defense acquisition.

The goal will be to implement smaller programs to meet the needs of more people in a timelier manner, he explained.

"Smaller programs are more successful," Harp said. "We can compete with industry delivering programs of 75,000 lines of code or less. When you start getting up into [millions of] lines of code, even industry can't deliver them on time and on schedule.

"This whole direction that we're going with the small, modular approach may lend itself to more successes," he said.

All Active-Duty, Most Reserve Components Meet Recruiting Goals

By John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service

July 10, 2009 - All active-duty military components met or exceeded their recruiting goals in June, with the Marine Corps adding the highest percentage of its target to its ranks, Defense Department officials announced today. Military reserve components, with the exception of the Army National Guard, also met or exceeded their goals.

Data published on the Defense Department Web site shows that the Marine Corps goal was to add 3,655 new Marines, which it exceeded by 14 percent, recruiting a total of 4,155. The Marine Corps Reserve more than doubled its goal of 565, adding more than 1,200 Marines.

The Army National Guard fell short of its mark, recruiting 84 percent of its goal to add 3,209 soldiers.

Here is the breakdown of the other components:

-- Active-duty Army: 6,207 accessions with a goal of 6,025, for 103 percent;

-- Active-duty Navy: 3,428 accessions with a goal of 3,428, for 100 percent;

-- Active-duty Air Force: 2,846 accessions with a goal of 2,835, for 100 percent;

-- Army Reserve: 4,091 accessions with a goal of 3,488, for 117 percent;

-- Navy Reserve: 726 accessions with a goal of 726, for 100 percent;

-- Air National Guard: 867 accessions with a goal of 810, for 107 percent; and

-- Air Force Reserve: 836 accessions with a goal of 836 for 100 percent.

Report Urges Timeline for Tobacco-free Military

By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service

July 10, 2009 - The military has come a long way from the time when it packaged cigarettes in with rations, but more must be done, according to an Institute of Medicine report. The report, titled "Combating Tobacco in Military and Veteran Populations," calls for the Defense Department to set a timeline to eliminate smoking on military installations.

Officials from the Pentagon and Department of Veterans Affairs asked the institute to prepare the report in 2007. It was released June 28.

More than 30 percent of active-duty military members use tobacco products of some kind. "Of greater concern, the rate of tobacco use in the military has increased since 1998, threatening to reverse the steady decline of the last several decades," the report says. "Furthermore, smoking rates among military personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan may be 50 percent higher than rates among nondeployed military personnel."

The Defense Department and the services have worked hard to become tobacco-free. The services have banned use of tobacco products during basic training, the report said, and they have launched extensive public-education campaigns and commander training. "The committee recommends that [the Defense Department] establish a timeline to eliminate all tobacco use on military installations to protect the health of all military personnel, civilian employees, family members and visitors," the report says.

The committee --– chaired by Stuart Bondurant, a professor of medicine and dean emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill --– found that "achieving a tobacco-free military begins by closing the pipeline of new tobacco users entering the military and by promoting cessation programs to ensure abstinence."

The committee recommends using a phased approach. The military academies and officer training programs should become tobacco-free first, followed by new enlisted recruits and finally all other active-duty personnel, the report says.

The Defense Department fully supports the goal of a tobacco-free military, said Pentagon spokeswoman Cynthia Smith, and officials believe it's achievable through development and execution of a comprehensive plan as recommended by the report. "However," she added, "achieving that goal will in part depend on coincident reductions of tobacco use in the civilian population."

The department has been at the forefront of tobacco-cessation efforts. Officials recently launched the "Quit Tobacco - Make Everyone Proud" campaign at http://www.ucanquit2.org. It targets young enlisted men and women who use tobacco. The Web site provides information, resources, interactive tools and practical help. Servicemembers who want to quit tobacco can get immediate help from a trained tobacco-cessation coach from 8:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. EST every day.

The report also recommends that the Defense Department to stop selling tobacco products in military commissaries and exchanges, to prohibit tobacco use anywhere on military installations, and to treat tobacco use in the same way as other health-related behaviors, such as alcohol abuse and poor physical fitness.